From: SMS on
Daniel Prince wrote:
> Bill <carver-rem-33(a)bellsouth.net> wrote:
>
>> I have the Maha MH-C401FS and love it. 4 batteries on independant
>> circuits so they each will charge as needed. Fast and slow charge
>> options. I only use mine on 110 volt, but believe it came with a 220
>> volt adapter.
>
> But how do you travel back in time more than 30 years to when the
> standard US household voltage was 110 volts?

He didn't say that the standard voltage was 110 volts, just that he uses
his charger on 110 volts.
From: Bill on
On Fri, 13 Jul 2007 21:42:07 -0700, Daniel Prince
<neutrino1(a)ca.rr.com> wrote:

>Bill <carver-rem-33(a)bellsouth.net> wrote:
>
>>I have the Maha MH-C401FS and love it. 4 batteries on independant
>>circuits so they each will charge as needed. Fast and slow charge
>>options. I only use mine on 110 volt, but believe it came with a 220
>>volt adapter.
>
>But how do you travel back in time more than 30 years to when the
>standard US household voltage was 110 volts?

You live 30 years in the future?

It depends on how you measure alternating current - if you look it up,
you will find it called 120 vac, 110 vac and occasionally 115 vac or
even 117 vac. I don't really remember my high school electronics, but
I think it had to do with minimum, peak or rms measurements.


From: SMS on
Bill wrote:

> It depends on how you measure alternating current - if you look it up,
> you will find it called 120 vac, 110 vac and occasionally 115 vac or
> even 117 vac. I don't really remember my high school electronics, but
> I think it had to do with minimum, peak or rms measurements.

No, it's always RMS for household voltage.

The "official" US voltage is now 120 VAC. Transmission line losses mean
that you won't see exactly 120 VAC at the outlet.

It has gone up over the years as loads have increased, since it's so
much easier to raise the voltage than allow for increased current.

The peak voltage out of a household 120V outlet is +/- 170. (SQRT2 * 120).
From: Ron Hunter on
SMS wrote:
> Ron Hunter wrote:
>
>> Sure. I do when I travel by car. Since I carry the inverter in my
>> laptop bag any time I go out of the house with the laptop, there is
>> really no particular problem.
>
> Argh, it drives me crazy to have so many wires and devices strewn
> everywhere around the mobile unit. I even installed a 12V outlet in the
> overhead console by the rear-view mirror, so I could power the GPS
> without running wires up across the dash.
>
>> Now if own is trekking through the Rainforests in Costa Rica, it might
>> be a bad idea as power outlets are not likely to be found there....
>
> You need the solar charger for that. There aren't any 7-11's to buy AA
> batteries at.

I VERY rarely use the laptop in the car for longer than the batteries
will last, but when I do, the inverter is quite handy for the purpose,
and the wires don't bother me.
My GPS battery (Li-ion) will run the unit for about 17 hours if I don't
use the backlight much. I find that more than adequate for any single
day's travel. I don't have a 'car cord' for it since the battery lasts
so long, but could use the inverter, and the 'wall wort' should I really
need to recharge it in use, but with considerable rat's nest of wires.
From: Ron Hunter on
SMS wrote:
> Ron Hunter wrote:
>
>> I rarely fly far enough that the batteries won't last long enough for
>> the time I can use the notebook during a flight.
>
> Yeah, YMMV. I do a lot of overseas and cross country flights. Seems like
> doing Powerpoint presentations is more important than sleeping.

Haven't flown such long flights for the last 15 years or so. Don't plan
any more unless I win a lottery or something.