From: Ron Hunter on
Bill wrote:
> On Fri, 13 Jul 2007 21:42:07 -0700, Daniel Prince
> <neutrino1(a)ca.rr.com> wrote:
>
>> Bill <carver-rem-33(a)bellsouth.net> wrote:
>>
>>> I have the Maha MH-C401FS and love it. 4 batteries on independant
>>> circuits so they each will charge as needed. Fast and slow charge
>>> options. I only use mine on 110 volt, but believe it came with a 220
>>> volt adapter.
>> But how do you travel back in time more than 30 years to when the
>> standard US household voltage was 110 volts?
>
> You live 30 years in the future?
>
> It depends on how you measure alternating current - if you look it up,
> you will find it called 120 vac, 110 vac and occasionally 115 vac or
> even 117 vac. I don't really remember my high school electronics, but
> I think it had to do with minimum, peak or rms measurements.
>
>
True, but the actual power delivered in the US may vary from those
specs. In some places, quite a bit, as may the frequency of the AC.
From: SMS on
Ron Hunter wrote:

> My GPS battery (Li-ion) will run the unit for about 17 hours if I don't
> use the backlight much. I find that more than adequate for any single
> day's travel.

I don't like carrying the AC charger with me on long trips, so I prefer
to just keep it powered, but you're right, the Li-Ion battery does last
for a long time.
From: Ron Hunter on
SMS wrote:
> Ron Hunter wrote:
>
>> My GPS battery (Li-ion) will run the unit for about 17 hours if I
>> don't use the backlight much. I find that more than adequate for any
>> single day's travel.
>
> I don't like carrying the AC charger with me on long trips, so I prefer
> to just keep it powered, but you're right, the Li-Ion battery does last
> for a long time.

As I type this, my GPS is recharging from the USB port on my laptop
(which is on AC power as it sits next to my recliner) after a trip today.
Photos of the trip are on Webshots under rphunter42. Just find my
homepage there.
From: SMS on
Ron Hunter wrote:
> SMS wrote:
>> Ron Hunter wrote:
>>
>>> My GPS battery (Li-ion) will run the unit for about 17 hours if I
>>> don't use the backlight much. I find that more than adequate for any
>>> single day's travel.
>>
>> I don't like carrying the AC charger with me on long trips, so I
>> prefer to just keep it powered, but you're right, the Li-Ion battery
>> does last for a long time.
>
> As I type this, my GPS is recharging from the USB port on my laptop
> (which is on AC power as it sits next to my recliner) after a trip today.
> Photos of the trip are on Webshots under rphunter42. Just find my
> homepage there.

USB charging is great.

It's be great if the U.S. passed a similar law as China passed for cell
phones, but extended it to all devices with a battery of 5 WH or less.
From: Irwin Peckinloomer on
In article <e5KdnRUrDJP-TwTbnZ2dnUVZ_hSdnZ2d(a)giganews.com>,
rphunter(a)charter.net says...
> >
> > It depends on how you measure alternating current - if you look it up,
> > you will find it called 120 vac, 110 vac and occasionally 115 vac or
> > even 117 vac. I don't really remember my high school electronics, but
> > I think it had to do with minimum, peak or rms measurements.
> >
> >
> True, but the actual power delivered in the US may vary from those
> specs. In some places, quite a bit, as may the frequency of the AC.
>
It's all nominal. The assumption is 120 volts at the source (utility
transformer) and 110 (or 108) volts at the appliance (asuming a nominal
10% (+-) voltage drop thru the wiring). Thus 440 volt motors are used on
480 volt systems, 220 volt motors on 240 volt systems, etc.
In reality 110, 115, 120 volt all mean the same class of equipment.
And yes, as the previous poster said, the actual voltage at the
receptacle will vary, but works OK within limits.