From: SMS on
Irwin Peckinloomer wrote:
> In article <e5KdnRUrDJP-TwTbnZ2dnUVZ_hSdnZ2d(a)giganews.com>,
> rphunter(a)charter.net says...
>>> It depends on how you measure alternating current - if you look it up,
>>> you will find it called 120 vac, 110 vac and occasionally 115 vac or
>>> even 117 vac. I don't really remember my high school electronics, but
>>> I think it had to do with minimum, peak or rms measurements.
>>>
>>>
>> True, but the actual power delivered in the US may vary from those
>> specs. In some places, quite a bit, as may the frequency of the AC.
>>
> It's all nominal. The assumption is 120 volts at the source (utility
> transformer) and 110 (or 108) volts at the appliance (asuming a nominal
> 10% (+-) voltage drop thru the wiring). Thus 440 volt motors are used on
> 480 volt systems, 220 volt motors on 240 volt systems, etc.
> In reality 110, 115, 120 volt all mean the same class of equipment.
> And yes, as the previous poster said, the actual voltage at the
> receptacle will vary, but works OK within limits.

While the voltage may vary, the frequency will not. It's very tightly
controlled on the entire grid. There is heavy dependence on 60 Hertz for
timing devices.
From: Irwin Peckinloomer on
In article <469c9224$0$27244$742ec2ed(a)news.sonic.net>,
scharf.steven(a)geemail.com says...
> Irwin Peckinloomer wrote:
> > In article <e5KdnRUrDJP-TwTbnZ2dnUVZ_hSdnZ2d(a)giganews.com>,
> > rphunter(a)charter.net says...
> >>> It depends on how you measure alternating current - if you look it up,
> >>> you will find it called 120 vac, 110 vac and occasionally 115 vac or
> >>> even 117 vac. I don't really remember my high school electronics, but
> >>> I think it had to do with minimum, peak or rms measurements.
> >>>
> >>>
> >> True, but the actual power delivered in the US may vary from those
> >> specs. In some places, quite a bit, as may the frequency of the AC.
> >>
> > It's all nominal. The assumption is 120 volts at the source (utility
> > transformer) and 110 (or 108) volts at the appliance (asuming a nominal
> > 10% (+-) voltage drop thru the wiring). Thus 440 volt motors are used on
> > 480 volt systems, 220 volt motors on 240 volt systems, etc.
> > In reality 110, 115, 120 volt all mean the same class of equipment.
> > And yes, as the previous poster said, the actual voltage at the
> > receptacle will vary, but works OK within limits.
>
> While the voltage may vary, the frequency will not. It's very tightly
> controlled on the entire grid. There is heavy dependence on 60 Hertz for
> timing devices.
>
Unless you go to Britain, or the Middle east (or a number of other
places) where it's 50 Hz (but also tightly controlled). Motors, and most
to the point, transformers will be strongly affected by this difference
in frequency. However some chargers are able to compensate, and will say
on the nameplates "50-60 hz, and usually 110-240 volts", they will work
almost anywhere.
From: Ron Hunter on
SMS wrote:
> Irwin Peckinloomer wrote:
>> In article <e5KdnRUrDJP-TwTbnZ2dnUVZ_hSdnZ2d(a)giganews.com>,
>> rphunter(a)charter.net says...
>>>> It depends on how you measure alternating current - if you look it up,
>>>> you will find it called 120 vac, 110 vac and occasionally 115 vac or
>>>> even 117 vac. I don't really remember my high school electronics, but
>>>> I think it had to do with minimum, peak or rms measurements.
>>>>
>>>>
>>> True, but the actual power delivered in the US may vary from those
>>> specs. In some places, quite a bit, as may the frequency of the AC.
>>>
>> It's all nominal. The assumption is 120 volts at the source (utility
>> transformer) and 110 (or 108) volts at the appliance (asuming a
>> nominal 10% (+-) voltage drop thru the wiring). Thus 440 volt motors
>> are used on 480 volt systems, 220 volt motors on 240 volt systems, etc.
>> In reality 110, 115, 120 volt all mean the same class of equipment.
>> And yes, as the previous poster said, the actual voltage at the
>> receptacle will vary, but works OK within limits.
>
> While the voltage may vary, the frequency will not. It's very tightly
> controlled on the entire grid. There is heavy dependence on 60 Hertz for
> timing devices.

Actually, many states don't have good frequency regulation. Some
correct the frequency as infrequently as every three minutes. Clocks
used on such power lines may be off by as much as 3 minutes a day! The
ONLY state that closely regulates frequency to 60hz checked each second,
is Texas, which is why we are NOT connected to the 'national power
grid'. Connecting a closely regulated frequency power line at high
voltage to another that is not closely regulated is a difficult, and
expensive, proposition.
From: Ron Hunter on
Irwin Peckinloomer wrote:
> In article <469c9224$0$27244$742ec2ed(a)news.sonic.net>,
> scharf.steven(a)geemail.com says...
>> Irwin Peckinloomer wrote:
>>> In article <e5KdnRUrDJP-TwTbnZ2dnUVZ_hSdnZ2d(a)giganews.com>,
>>> rphunter(a)charter.net says...
>>>>> It depends on how you measure alternating current - if you look it up,
>>>>> you will find it called 120 vac, 110 vac and occasionally 115 vac or
>>>>> even 117 vac. I don't really remember my high school electronics, but
>>>>> I think it had to do with minimum, peak or rms measurements.
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>> True, but the actual power delivered in the US may vary from those
>>>> specs. In some places, quite a bit, as may the frequency of the AC.
>>>>
>>> It's all nominal. The assumption is 120 volts at the source (utility
>>> transformer) and 110 (or 108) volts at the appliance (asuming a nominal
>>> 10% (+-) voltage drop thru the wiring). Thus 440 volt motors are used on
>>> 480 volt systems, 220 volt motors on 240 volt systems, etc.
>>> In reality 110, 115, 120 volt all mean the same class of equipment.
>>> And yes, as the previous poster said, the actual voltage at the
>>> receptacle will vary, but works OK within limits.
>> While the voltage may vary, the frequency will not. It's very tightly
>> controlled on the entire grid. There is heavy dependence on 60 Hertz for
>> timing devices.
>>
> Unless you go to Britain, or the Middle east (or a number of other
> places) where it's 50 Hz (but also tightly controlled). Motors, and most
> to the point, transformers will be strongly affected by this difference
> in frequency. However some chargers are able to compensate, and will say
> on the nameplates "50-60 hz, and usually 110-240 volts", they will work
> almost anywhere.

The power supplies not greatly affected by the difference between 50 and
60hz systems are 'switching' power supplies, and they are usually
designed to work as well with voltages from 95 to 260 volts.
From: Miles on
* mehlREMOVETHIS(a)cyvest.com wrote:
> Hello --
>
> Can anyone help me narrow my search for a charger suitable for
> traveling? I am not digesting all the technical information available
> in this group.
> My new camera is a Canon S5 IS. I assume the battery type to get in
> NiMH.
>
> Requirements for the charger:
> - 100 - 240 V
> - lightweight, if possible
> - independent charging channels
> - holds 4 batteries
> - slow charge standard or as an option
> - mAh rating ?
> - USB capability not needed
>
>
> I will appreciate any recommendations of specific brands of charger
> and/or battery.
>
> Thanks in advance for any help.
>
> Larry Mehl
>

If you or anyone else is interested: Last year I bought a La Crosse
BC900 with the intent of also buying a camera that would use AA batts.
The charger arrived, but the camera did not prior to my departure for
two months to Asia. So I bought a different camera in Asia which did not
require AA or AAA batts. Included with the charger are 4x AA 2500mAh
batts, 4x2300, 4x2000 and 4x700. And I have discharged and recharged all
batteries twice. A travel case, and the charger is 100-240VAC. Charging
current range 200mA to 1800mA. Cost was about $90.

Since I don't have need for it, $35 plus shipping from San Francisco Bay
Area and it's yours. If more info is needed, please let me know.

Miles Chapuis