From: Thomas T. Veldhouse on
SMS <scharf.steven(a)geemail.com> wrote:
> Thomas T. Veldhouse wrote:
>
> The USB charging capability is _really_ nice to have. When I had the
> Panasonic charger with that capability it saved space when traveling
> since I had a notebook computer with me anyway. I like to travel light
> when I go to Asia, and reducing the number of wall warts is a prime way
> to save space. This is one reason why I like the Li-Ion cameras, the
> chargers are usually very small, with no wires, the battery slides into
> the charger, and the charger has a flip out plug.

I prefer to carry an inverter for in-car charging [aka cigarette lighter
adapter], which delivers a LOT more power, in excess of 60 watts in my case.

Also, the 401FS I have is very portable thanks to the supplied adapters.

In my opinion, screw USB for the vast majority of charging uses not excepting
NiMH batteries.

--
Thomas T. Veldhouse

We have more to fear from the bungling of the incompetent than from the
machinations of the wicked.

From: Thomas T. Veldhouse on
SMS <scharf.steven(a)geemail.com> wrote:
> Thomas T. Veldhouse wrote:
>
>> So, then you can't recommend the Maha MH-C401FS either, can you?
>>
>> Rapid Charge Current: 1000mA (AA), 500mA (AAA)
>> Slow (Gentle) Charge Current: 300mA (AA), 200mA (AAA)
>> Trickle Charge: 50mA
>
> Sure I can, the 1000 mA is fine. The 500 is low. Again, it's a trade-off
> with charge rates, if you believe the NiMH battery experts. Higher
> charge rates get you more of the rated capacity, while lower charge
> rates make the batteries last longer because the batteries don't get
> hot. This assumes that the lower charge rates are still high enough to
> cut off charging properly, but since the primary method of charge cut
> off is voltage plateau sensing (dV/dt), it should be fine. Only the more
> expensive chargers do dT/dt sensing, in the less expensive chargers the
> temperature sensing is just for over-temp, not for determining end of
> charge.
>

Did you even read it? The low charge rate [which is recommended by Maha] for
AA batteries is 300mA. For AAA it is 200mA. These are the RECOMMENDED rates
[slow switch setting] for use on the MH-C401FS.

> I may buy the Ultralast charger today, I want to try some low-discharge
> batteries as an alternative to the lithium AA batteries.
>

I recommend the Maha MH-C9000 with Sanyo Eneloop batteries. The Rayovac or
Hybrio are a bit more economic, but don't appear to have as consistant
capacity.

--
Thomas T. Veldhouse

We have more to fear from the bungling of the incompetent than from the
machinations of the wicked.

From: Thomas T. Veldhouse on
SMS <scharf.steven(a)geemail.com> wrote:
> Thomas T. Veldhouse wrote:
>> Yuki <nospam(a)gmail.com> wrote:
>>> On Wed, 11 Jul 2007 06:22:10 -0000, "mehlREMOVETHIS(a)cyvest.com"
>>>
>>> I'm very happy with a Sony BGC-34HRMD that meets all of above, has a LCD display
>>> and refresh function. It uses a short cable for power, no wall wart. Weight
>>> 5oz/139g. Medium charge speed, around 4 hours for 4 depleted AA batteries.
>>>
>>> Seems that the current incarnation has the reference BCG-34HRMF4, comes bundled
>>> with 4 2700mA Sanyo made batteries, priced around $30.
>>>
>>
>> They sell it at Costco for $24.99 and it comes with two AAA (1000mAh)
>> batteries as well as the 4 AAA (2700mAh) and the charger. The charger claims
>> the ability to condition the batteries, which is likely a decent plus.
>
> Which Costco? The one's around here have a Duracell charger and
> batteries for $30 IIRC. No great deal.

The Costco in Coon Rapids, MN. They carry both the Duracell and the Sony
charger. They are a few feet apart in the aisle ... oddly, not directly
adjacent to each other.

--
Thomas T. Veldhouse

We have more to fear from the bungling of the incompetent than from the
machinations of the wicked.

From: Ron Hunter on
ASAAR wrote:
> On Fri, 13 Jul 2007 02:52:44 -0500, Ron Hunter wrote:
>
>> Assuming that the Eneloop and similar batteries perform as advertised
>> (and user reports seem favorable), then they are preferable over the
>> standard NiMH type for all but the most sever uses, and certainly better
>> for the sporadic picture taker. Better than Li-Ion? Not if weight is
>> an important issue.
>
> Of course, and I haven't disagreed with that. What SMS has said
> many times is that Li-Ion is better than NiMH when compared by
> weight and by volume. That's still true for weight, but when
> compared by volume, NiMH is practically the equal of Li-Ion, since
> the size (volume) of AA cells is pretty constant, but the capacity
> has increased by a huge amount, about triple what the first NiMH
> batteries could achieve. If you check Energizer's data sheets
> you'll see that they rate their own lithium AA cells at 3,000mAh,
> not much more than alkaline and NiMH cells. As I've said before,
> the lithium cells show no appreciable advantage over alkalines for
> very low current devices, such as clocks, smoke detectors and
> perhaps even radios, if they're played at very low volume.
>
> Assuming that Li-Ion batteries have the same density as lithium AA
> cells, I don't expect to see NiMH batteries compete with Li-Ion
> batteries on a weight basis, since to reach parity they'd have to up
> their capacity to almost 6,000mAh per cell, and I don't expect to
> see that anytime soon, if ever. :)
>
Since a battery is a chemical storage device, and the size is fixed, I
would expect a theoretical maximum value at some point. Certainly the
power density to weight of the Lithium cell is greater, but I don't know
about the power density to volume....
From: Ron Hunter on
Thomas T. Veldhouse wrote:
> SMS <scharf.steven(a)geemail.com> wrote:
>> Thomas T. Veldhouse wrote:
>>
>> The USB charging capability is _really_ nice to have. When I had the
>> Panasonic charger with that capability it saved space when traveling
>> since I had a notebook computer with me anyway. I like to travel light
>> when I go to Asia, and reducing the number of wall warts is a prime way
>> to save space. This is one reason why I like the Li-Ion cameras, the
>> chargers are usually very small, with no wires, the battery slides into
>> the charger, and the charger has a flip out plug.
>
> I prefer to carry an inverter for in-car charging [aka cigarette lighter
> adapter], which delivers a LOT more power, in excess of 60 watts in my case.
>
> Also, the 401FS I have is very portable thanks to the supplied adapters.
>
> In my opinion, screw USB for the vast majority of charging uses not excepting
> NiMH batteries.
>

I use a small inverter I got at Sam's for $10 and which puts out 90
watts. I have run my laptop on it for hours, WHILE CHARGING and a full
charge only took a couple of hours. The inverter wasn't even warm at
the end. This certainly is cheaper than paying $100 for the HP version
of a car charger!