From: SMS on
Ron Hunter wrote:

> Assuming that the Eneloop and similar batteries perform as advertised
> (and user reports seem favorable), then they are preferable over the
> standard NiMH type for all but the most sever uses, and certainly better
> for the sporadic picture taker. Better than Li-Ion? Not if weight is
> an important issue.

Li-Ion has a higher energy density by weight. Plus you have to carry
less spares. Plus the charger is smaller and lighter.
From: SMS on
Ron Hunter wrote:
> SMS wrote:
>> Thomas T. Veldhouse wrote:
>>> SMS <scharf.steven(a)geemail.com> wrote:
>>>> As to batteries, get Eneloop or Hybrio, not standard NiMH.
>>>>
>>>
>>> That completely depends upon usage pattern. If you are travelling and
>>> planning to shoot a lot of pictures for instance, the higher capacity
>>> standard
>>> NiMH (i.e. 2700mAh) might make more sense.
>>
>> Yes, this is true. There are some instances where the higher capacity
>> is more valuable than the low self-discharge.
>
> I suspect that the actual 'in use' difference between a fully charged
> 2700mAh NiMH battery and a fully charged Eneloop 2100mAh battery would
> be only a few pictures, and then only in those rare cases where one
> actually uses a battery to discharge in a single day. Over a couple of
> days the slow self-discharge rate of the Eneloop would probably level
> the playing field.

Yes, maybe I should have said "rare instances" rather than "some instances."
From: SMS on
Thomas T. Veldhouse wrote:
> SMS <scharf.steven(a)geemail.com> wrote:
>> Thomas T. Veldhouse wrote:
>>
>> The USB charging capability is _really_ nice to have. When I had the
>> Panasonic charger with that capability it saved space when traveling
>> since I had a notebook computer with me anyway. I like to travel light
>> when I go to Asia, and reducing the number of wall warts is a prime way
>> to save space. This is one reason why I like the Li-Ion cameras, the
>> chargers are usually very small, with no wires, the battery slides into
>> the charger, and the charger has a flip out plug.
>
> I prefer to carry an inverter for in-car charging [aka cigarette lighter
> adapter], which delivers a LOT more power, in excess of 60 watts in my case.

The car outlet can supply about 120 watts in most cars, are you saying
the performance is better on the 401FS with an inverter and the AC
supply, than it is directly from the car with the DC cord?

> In my opinion, screw USB for the vast majority of charging uses not excepting
> NiMH batteries.

USB chargers make it one (or many) less things to carry when traveling.
They're great for MP3 players, PDAs, and phones, and acceptable for NiMH
batteries, though not optimal. Some point and shoot cameras charge the
Li-Ion battery directly from USB, in-camera, though not many.
From: Thomas T. Veldhouse on
SMS <scharf.steven(a)geemail.com> wrote:

> Li-Ion has a higher energy density by weight. Plus you have to carry
> less spares. Plus the charger is smaller and lighter.

Why is the charger smaller and lighter? Citation please.

--
Thomas T. Veldhouse

We have more to fear from the bungling of the incompetent than from the
machinations of the wicked.

From: Thomas T. Veldhouse on
SMS <scharf.steven(a)geemail.com> wrote:
> Thomas T. Veldhouse wrote:
>
> The car outlet can supply about 120 watts in most cars, are you saying
> the performance is better on the 401FS with an inverter and the AC
> supply, than it is directly from the car with the DC cord?
>

Where did you get that from? No. My inverter has a 60W sustained power and
75W peak power rating IIRC. I use it to charge all sorts of batteries [via an
AC plug] such as the LiIon for my D200 camera. That charger is not much
different in size than my MH-C401FS, which incidentally has its own car
adapter.

>> In my opinion, screw USB for the vast majority of charging uses not excepting
>> NiMH batteries.
>
> USB chargers make it one (or many) less things to carry when traveling.
> They're great for MP3 players, PDAs, and phones, and acceptable for NiMH
> batteries, though not optimal. Some point and shoot cameras charge the
> Li-Ion battery directly from USB, in-camera, though not many.

No it doesn't, it requires you to carry a laptop or other USB supply. If you
already carry one, you still need AC power to the laptop to charge batteries
via USB ... unless you really don't care about the power in your laptop battery
;-)

--
Thomas T. Veldhouse

We have more to fear from the bungling of the incompetent than from the
machinations of the wicked.