From: Lawrence Akutagawa on

"Ken Hart" <kwhart1(a)verizon.net> wrote in message
news:flv58p$ooe$1(a)aioe.org...
>
> "Geoffrey S. Mendelson" <gsm(a)mendelson.com> wrote in message
> news:slrnfo511a.l36.gsm(a)cable.mendelson.com...
>> G.T. wrote:
>>> Rob Morley wrote:
>>> If I were to use a drum what would I need? Is it similar to processing
>>> film?
>>
>> It depends. The simple ones are drums that are like daylight tanks
>> for stainless steel reels, they have a light trap at the fill end
>> that does not depend upon a reel.
>>
>> You stuff the print in it in the dark, close it up and and develop.
>> Simple drums get rolled on the table, more complex systems have
>> rolling machines.
>>
>> Normally they are used for color because consistent agitation and
>> temperature control are necessary.
>>
>> There are all sorts of drums for the rolling machines including one
>> that holds sheet film in an interrupted spiral. You would use it for
>> small prints if you want to develop several at a time.
>>
>> Look up Jobo.
> Also look up Unicolor.
>>
>>> Print, load in drum, fill with developer, agitate, empty developer, fill
>>> with stop and agitate, empty, fill with fixer and agitate, empty. Then
>>> hypo clear, wash, and dry?
>
> I have a Unicolor 8x10 drum. It's about 4" in diameter and 8+" long. The
> bottom is sealed and the top has light baffles thru which the chems are
> poured. The Unicolor drum has "feet" so that it sits horizontally, the
> chems are poured in and go into a 'trough'. When the drum is rolled off of
> it's feet, the chems flow over the paper. According to the instructions,
> it requires only 2 ounces of chems. I don't trust this figure and I use at
> least 8 ounces, depending on the process. (I use mine for C-41 or RA-4)
> The drum will hold 1-8x10 or 2-5x7 or 4-4x5.
> If you go this route, find a roller base. Rolling this thing back and
> forth across the table gets boring Very Quickly!
> Check eBay; the drums and roller bases appear often. I bought my drum as
> part of a Unicolor color print kit back in the 1970's, and the drum cost
> me $15 a year or so ago on eBay. If you can, get more than one drum. They
> can be difficult to reload when damp-- the paper can stick to the sides
> and get hung up. If you have more than one, one can be draining while the
> other is in use.

[chuckle] I use mine for developing bw 4x5 film. And with four 4x5 sheets
in the drum, I find 150ml - about 5 oz - to be ample. One point - don't
screw on the lid tightly to the drum while in storage...if you do, you'll
find yourself needing another gasket. And those things are darned hard to
find - had to purchase another drum.


From: G.T. on
Geoffrey S. Mendelson wrote:
> G.T. wrote:
>> enlarger, lens, neg holder, timer
>
> I started out without a timer, I used a watch.
> Before that I used the the old "one-one thousand" method for
> timing exposure and developed by inspection.
>
>> safelight
>
> That's a touchy subject here. Safelight type, color and position vary a
> lot and as long as they don't fog your paper, it's a matter of money and
> personal preference. If you can figure out the electrical wiring a
> connection that turns off the safelight while the enlarger is on will
> make setup and focusing easier.
>
>> paper developer
>
> Yes, though some people have said that rodinal works in a pinch.

I forgot, I still have some Clayton P20.

>
>> 2 drums
>
> The more the merrier. You have to dry it completely between prints
> and that may take more time than anything else. A hair dryer?
>
>> I can use my two trays for the initial wash and hypo clearing?
>
> Sure, if you have a sink, you can rinse the print off in it and
> then soak it, which may use more water, or do the final wash in
> a bucket or a vertical washer.
>
>> something to use for washing
>
> A while ago I mentioned converting an aquarium to a vertical
> processor, a leaky one could be used for a washer.
>
>> print wiper
>> dryer?
>
> I don't really think they are needed for RC paper, for fiber
> paper you would. RC prints dry nicely on a clothes line
> (indoors to prevent dust) or a dish rack.
>

I've got a ton of RC paper left and about 20 sheets of 8x10 fiber.

>
>> What am I missing?
>
> Tongs, stop bath and fixer. Gloves if you have skin problems
> with the chemicals.
>

Yeah, got those except for the gloves.

Greg
From: David Nebenzahl on
On 1/7/2008 11:28 PM G.T. spake thus:

> Geoffrey S. Mendelson wrote:
>
>> Tongs, stop bath and fixer. Gloves if you have skin problems
>> with the chemicals.
>
> Yeah, got those except for the gloves.

Gloves are for sissies.
From: G.T. on
David Nebenzahl wrote:
> On 1/7/2008 11:28 PM G.T. spake thus:
>
>> Geoffrey S. Mendelson wrote:
> >
>>> Tongs, stop bath and fixer. Gloves if you have skin problems
>>> with the chemicals.
>>
>> Yeah, got those except for the gloves.
>
> Gloves are for sissies.

Heh, nice motto.

Greg
From: Geoffrey S. Mendelson on
David Nebenzahl wrote:

> Gloves are for sissies.

I found that in the 1980's skin problems I had went away when exposed to
developing chemicals, but other people have had severe reactions.

I have a sensitivity to vinegar and switched to citric acid based stop
bath.

Geoff.

--
Geoffrey S. Mendelson, Jerusalem, Israel gsm(a)mendelson.com N3OWJ/4X1GM
IL Voice: (07)-7424-1667 U.S. Voice: 1-215-821-1838
Visit my 'blog at http://geoffstechno.livejournal.com/
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