From: Rob Morley on
In article <13o626cl2okuo23(a)corp.supernews.com>, G.T.
getnews1(a)dslextreme.com says...

> My bathroom is tiny, tiny. Not much room to stand while brushing my
> teeth and the toilet is in a space that I'm not sure I can fit an
> enlarger on the toilet seat. It would be very difficult to print in the
> my bathroom. And there is just too much light outside at night to close
> off my kitchen.
>
You could always make a blackout tent. This can consist of as little as
a box (or fabric covered frame) in which to stand the enlarger on a
table, and a hood of blackout fabric that you duck inside and close
around your waist.
From: Andrew Price on
On Tue, 8 Jan 2008 07:24:03 +0000 (UTC), gsm(a)mendelson.com (Geoffrey
S. Mendelson) wrote:

[---]

>As for timing the processing steps, there is a nice freeware
>program for the Palm Pilot that does it and you could probably
>pick up an old one for free. From what I can see, anything
>without a color screen, MP3 playback, etc has long since
>be stuck in a drawer as too good to throw away and not
>good enough to use, but it would be perfect.

That's exactly what I use my old Palm III for. Works very well
indeed.
From: Rod Smith on
In article <13o5st6mfb3dj62(a)corp.supernews.com>,
"G.T." <getnews1(a)dslextreme.com> writes:
>
> "Rod Smith" <rodsmith(a)nessus.rodsbooks.com> wrote in message
> news:134b55-5n7.ln1(a)speaker.rodsbooks.com...
>>
>> Experimenting with products is fine; however, since you're just starting
>> out I'd like to caution you against going wild with all the films and
>> developers that are out there. You'll learn most quickly if you stick to
>> just one or two films and one developer while you learn. If you try a new
>> film/developer combination with every roll or two, you won't learn how the
>> two work together or be able to optimize your developing techniques. Learn
>> your basic techniques first and THEN start playing with different
>> developers.
>
> Basically, for good or bad, I'm using Tri-X 400 (I have also used some of
> the current Arista 400 film but for film right now I'm sticking with the
> Tri-X),

For future reference, Freestyle sells several different products under
their "Arista" label. You *MUST* pay attention to the specifics -- for
instance, Arista.EDU, Arista.EDU Ultra, and Arista II are all made by
different manufacturers. Many of these products have been discontinued
(mostly because of manufacturers going under, such as Agfa and Forte), so
Freestyle may not have much of some of these items left, but it's
imperative that you pay attention to this detail lest you get the wrong
developing time or provoke confusion in discussions with others.

> and on just my 2nd developer, the Rodinal, the 4 oz bottle. I'll
> finish this Rodinal up and try some Xtol. I won't be trying any other films
> until I get a feel for the differences of the Tri-X in the Accufine, the
> Rodinal, and then the Xtol.
>
> Is that reasonable?

Your first post mentioned that you'd just finished developing your first
three rolls "at home." If you've not been developing film elsewhere, going
through as many developers as you mention after just three rolls is
inadvisable; stick with ONE for a while. "A while" is rather vague, I
admit; if you need more precision, I'd say 10-20 rolls before you start
trying other things.

--
Rod Smith, rodsmith(a)rodsbooks.com
http://www.rodsbooks.com
Author of books on Linux, FreeBSD, and networking
From: G.T. on

"Rod Smith" <rodsmith(a)nessus.rodsbooks.com> wrote in message
news:ar4d55-v8d.ln1(a)speaker.rodsbooks.com...
> In article <13o5st6mfb3dj62(a)corp.supernews.com>,
> "G.T." <getnews1(a)dslextreme.com> writes:
>>
>> "Rod Smith" <rodsmith(a)nessus.rodsbooks.com> wrote in message
>> news:134b55-5n7.ln1(a)speaker.rodsbooks.com...
>>>
>>> Experimenting with products is fine; however, since you're just starting
>>> out I'd like to caution you against going wild with all the films and
>>> developers that are out there. You'll learn most quickly if you stick to
>>> just one or two films and one developer while you learn. If you try a
>>> new
>>> film/developer combination with every roll or two, you won't learn how
>>> the
>>> two work together or be able to optimize your developing techniques.
>>> Learn
>>> your basic techniques first and THEN start playing with different
>>> developers.
>>
>> Basically, for good or bad, I'm using Tri-X 400 (I have also used some of
>> the current Arista 400 film but for film right now I'm sticking with the
>> Tri-X),
>
> For future reference, Freestyle sells several different products under
> their "Arista" label. You *MUST* pay attention to the specifics -- for
> instance, Arista.EDU, Arista.EDU Ultra, and Arista II are all made by
> different manufacturers. Many of these products have been discontinued
> (mostly because of manufacturers going under, such as Agfa and Forte), so
> Freestyle may not have much of some of these items left, but it's
> imperative that you pay attention to this detail lest you get the wrong
> developing time or provoke confusion in discussions with others.

Understood. It's Arista.EDU Ultra which I think is all they have in 120 at
this point.

>
>> and on just my 2nd developer, the Rodinal, the 4 oz bottle. I'll
>> finish this Rodinal up and try some Xtol. I won't be trying any other
>> films
>> until I get a feel for the differences of the Tri-X in the Accufine, the
>> Rodinal, and then the Xtol.
>>
>> Is that reasonable?
>
> Your first post mentioned that you'd just finished developing your first
> three rolls "at home." If you've not been developing film elsewhere, going
> through as many developers as you mention after just three rolls is
> inadvisable; stick with ONE for a while. "A while" is rather vague, I
> admit; if you need more precision, I'd say 10-20 rolls before you start
> trying other things.

No, I developed 24 rolls with Accufine in class, the 3 rolls with Rodinal
are the first I've developed at home. My instructor suggested trying Xtol
next but I tend to do my own thing. It's Rodinal for now, I've been mixing
it at 25+1 but to get more rolls done with it I'll start doing 50+1 or
100+1.

Thanks,
Greg


From: Rod Smith on
In article <slrnfo6927.t6p.gsm(a)cable.mendelson.com>,
gsm(a)mendelson.com (Geoffrey S. Mendelson) writes:
>
> G.T. wrote:
>> enlarger, lens, neg holder, timer
>
> I started out without a timer, I used a watch.
> Before that I used the the old "one-one thousand" method for
> timing exposure and developed by inspection.

Most eBay auctions for enlargers include negative carriers, usually a
lens, and sometimes a timer. A few enlargers (such as my Philips PCS130
with PCS150 control unit) have built-in timers.

>> safelight
>
> That's a touchy subject here. Safelight type, color and position vary a
> lot and as long as they don't fog your paper, it's a matter of money and
> personal preference. If you can figure out the electrical wiring a
> connection that turns off the safelight while the enlarger is on will
> make setup and focusing easier.

You can buy a red bulb to turn an ordinary light fixture into a safelight.
Painted tungsten bulbs are a bit risky that way, since the paint can get
scratched off, but they're cheap. Red LEDs (such as those from
http://www.superbrightleds.com) are likely to be safer. There are also, of
course, traditional safelights, which typically take low-wattage tungsten
bulbs and have amber or red filters.

>> 2 drums
>
> The more the merrier. You have to dry it completely between prints
> and that may take more time than anything else. A hair dryer?

I once tried a hair dryer for this purpose. It ended up cracking the
plastic (I could hear it crack). Now I use towels, except that I seldom
use my drums any more.

>> I can use my two trays for the initial wash and hypo clearing?
>
> Sure, if you have a sink, you can rinse the print off in it and
> then soak it, which may use more water, or do the final wash in
> a bucket or a vertical washer.

If you're using drums, you can do most everything in them. Hypo clear is
only necessary when using fiber-based paper; with resin-coated paper, you
skip the hypo clear.

>> print wiper
>> dryer?
>
> I don't really think they are needed for RC paper, for fiber
> paper you would. RC prints dry nicely on a clothes line
> (indoors to prevent dust) or a dish rack.

My high-tech RC paper dryer is wire-frame office folder separators from my
local Staples.

> As for timing the processing steps, there is a nice freeware
> program for the Palm Pilot that does it and you could probably
> pick up an old one for free. From what I can see, anything
> without a color screen, MP3 playback, etc has long since
> be stuck in a drawer as too good to throw away and not
> good enough to use, but it would be perfect.

I use a pair of cheap 3-way kitchen timers. I can time three steps on
each, which is handy (particularly for film processing). I'd worry about
getting chemicals on anything expensive, although an older Palm Pilot is
probably low enough in value that it's not worth worrying too much about.

--
Rod Smith, rodsmith(a)rodsbooks.com
http://www.rodsbooks.com
Author of books on Linux, FreeBSD, and networking
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