From: <jjs> on

"____" <internetphobic(a)deletedmail.com> wrote in message
news:internetphobic-4622DE.18414213012008(a)newsgroups.comcast.net...
> In article <13ol598rk5vlc0f(a)news.supernews.com>, <jjs> wrote:
:( I had a lens that shifted focus when stopped down.
>
> They all do to a smaller or larger amount.
>
> I've always focused at the intended f/stop. The lens goes to f/45
> typically I use f/22. With a Micromega focuser all but the tightest
> grain can be seen. Since I color print also, I am fairly comfortable
> with using fairly dim safe light when doing b&w printing.

Yes. I stop to F8 at the most and focus there. I've had some astounding
results with 16x20 prints from grainy 35mm. Grain is my friend.


From: George Mastellone on
____ wrote:

> I've always focused at the intended f/stop. The lens goes to f/45
> typically I use f/22. With a Micromega focuser all but the tightest
> grain can be seen. Since I color print also, I am fairly comfortable
> with using fairly dim safe light when doing b&w printing.
>

What lens, focal length and film format? I can't see any point in
stopping down so far (particularly with shorter focal length lenses for
smaller formats) since diffraction effects are going to cut down on
sharpness and obviously depth of field is no problem here! And think of
the time you'll save with shorter exposures!
From: dan.c.quinn on
On Jan 7, 11:30 am, "G.T." <getne...(a)dslextreme.com> wrote:v
>
> Print, load in drum, fill with developer, agitate, empty developer,
> fill with stop and agitate, empty, fill with fixer and agitate, empty.
> Then hypo clear, wash, and dry?
>
> Would the last paragraph be considered the one tray method?
> Thanks, Greg
>

One tray, one tank. Very similar. Big difference; tray with
safelights on. Nice to see what is going on which is very easy
when using Graded paper. A high level of yellow-ish orange
safelighting can be used. Emergence times are impossible
to measure if a tank is used and developing to completion
less certain.
Single tray processing takes some more solution volume
than does the tank; a quarter liter or a little more.doing
8x10s. I use developer and fixer one-shot very dilute
and as with film, mentioned in an earlier post,
needs no stop; develop, fix. Saves a lot of
space and cleanup time. Dan
From: ____ on
In article <Q6SdnXTSDrdeShfanZ2dnUVZ_i2dnZ2d(a)comcast.com>,
George Mastellone <widephoto(a)aol.com> wrote:

> ____ wrote:
>
> > I've always focused at the intended f/stop. The lens goes to f/45
> > typically I use f/22. With a Micromega focuser all but the tightest
> > grain can be seen. Since I color print also, I am fairly comfortable
> > with using fairly dim safe light when doing b&w printing.
> >
>
> What lens, focal length and film format? I can't see any point in
> stopping down so far (particularly with shorter focal length lenses for
> smaller formats) since diffraction effects are going to cut down on
> sharpness and obviously depth of field is no problem here! And think of
> the time you'll save with shorter exposures!

I don't want a shorter exposure than 12 seconds. Format in the above
case 4x5, focal length 150 mm. Darkroom work should not be a speed race
:)

--
Reality is a picture perfected and never looking back.
From: dan.c.quinn on
On Jan 9, 2:32 pm, "Ken Hart" <kwha...(a)verizon.net> wrote:
>
> > dryer?
>
> If you are using RC papers, don't fret wiping the print.
>

I keep a sponge handy for the purpose. Wet and squeese
dry before use. Wipe both sides. RC then dries very fast. Prop
or lay to dry.
I've quite RC and have gone all FB. Still sponge though.
Afterwards the prints are sandwiched twixt layers of non-woven,
hydrophobic polyester sheets and a special water resistant but
vapor permeable corrugated board. The print dryer.
Extremely inexpensive, extremely light weight, extremely,
portable, extremely compact. A slow and gentil dry for
FB prints. Dan