From: Ken Hart on

<dan.c.quinn(a)att.net> wrote in message
news:bfcc50b1-27b0-4865-b87c-4b75a5dc6e85(a)d70g2000hsb.googlegroups.com...
On Jan 9, 2:32 pm, "Ken Hart" <kwha...(a)verizon.net> wrote:
>
> > dryer?
>
> If you are using RC papers, don't fret wiping the print.
>

I keep a sponge handy for the purpose. Wet and squeese
dry before use. Wipe both sides. RC then dries very fast. Prop
or lay to dry.
I've quite RC and have gone all FB. Still sponge though.
Afterwards the prints are sandwiched twixt layers of non-woven,
hydrophobic polyester sheets and a special water resistant but
vapor permeable corrugated board. The print dryer.
Extremely inexpensive, extremely light weight, extremely,
portable, extremely compact. A slow and gentil dry for
FB prints. Dan

I have what I think is perhaps the best print 'air-dryer' that I've ever
owned... My studio building at one time was a grocery store. When I bought
the building, the seller left me a gift of every bit of trash that he had
accumulated! (Ever try to dispose of three 10' produce cases? The size is
one problem, the freon is the second prolem!) One of the items that I kept
was a bread rack. It's a metal stand, about 6' high, on wheels, that holds a
dozen plastic vented trays, each about 2x3'. Since the trays are plastic, I
can wash them off to prevent any chem buildup. It's a great gadget for air
drying prints, and if you hang around the rear of your local grocery store
after dark, you may be able to snag one!

Actually, if I need to dry prints fast, I just feed them into the wash rack
of the minilab. Done carefully, this even works with fiber prints getting
them about 75% dry. Doesn't everyone have a minilab in their darkroom?!


From: Richard Knoppow on

"Ken Hart" <kwhart1(a)verizon.net> wrote in message
news:flv4uc$o33$1(a)aioe.org...
>
> "David Nebenzahl" <nobody(a)but.us.chickens> wrote in
> message
> news:4782f423$0$16346$822641b3(a)news.adtechcomputers.com...
>> On 1/7/2008 7:28 PM G.T. spake thus:
>>
>>> I forgot to ask one question. What is the effect of
>>> fixing for too long?
>>
>> Image degradation, and in extreme cases, silver reduction
>> and image "bleaching"--but you'd have to leave the film
>> in for a very long time for this to happen.
>>
>> Don't sweat it.
>
> And that period of time would be measured with a calendar
> rather than aclock!
It depends on the fixer. Ammonium thiosulfate in acid is
capable of bleaching metallic silver in a relatively short
time. The problem exists mostly for the very fine grain
silver of printing paper rather than film but fixing times
should not be much extended beyond the time needed for
complete fixing. The bleaching effect is why rapid fixer is
diluted more for prints than film.
The bleaching takes place only when the fixer is acid,
neutral or alkaline rapid fixer does not bleach silver.
A good mild reducer for removing dichroic fog from film
can be made by adding about 15 grams per liter of citric
acid to standard film strength rapid fixer. Dichroic fog is
a deposit of very fine silver on the surface of the film.
Citric acid, in this application, is a sequestering
agent for the silver.


--
---
Richard Knoppow
Los Angeles, CA, USA
dickburk(a)ix.netcom.com


From: Lawrence Akutagawa on

"Richard Knoppow" <dickburk(a)ix.netcom.com> wrote in message
news:13pmr0hb39kjtfa(a)corp.supernews.com...
>
> "Ken Hart" <kwhart1(a)verizon.net> wrote in message
> news:flv4uc$o33$1(a)aioe.org...
>>
>> "David Nebenzahl" <nobody(a)but.us.chickens> wrote in message
>> news:4782f423$0$16346$822641b3(a)news.adtechcomputers.com...
>>> On 1/7/2008 7:28 PM G.T. spake thus:
>>>
>>>> I forgot to ask one question. What is the effect of fixing for too
>>>> long?
>>>
>>> Image degradation, and in extreme cases, silver reduction and image
>>> "bleaching"--but you'd have to leave the film in for a very long time
>>> for this to happen.
>>>
>>> Don't sweat it.
>>
>> And that period of time would be measured with a calendar rather than
>> aclock!
> It depends on the fixer. Ammonium thiosulfate in acid is capable of
> bleaching metallic silver in a relatively short time. The problem exists
> mostly for the very fine grain silver of printing paper rather than film
> but fixing times should not be much extended beyond the time needed for
> complete fixing. The bleaching effect is why rapid fixer is diluted more
> for prints than film.
> The bleaching takes place only when the fixer is acid, neutral or
> alkaline rapid fixer does not bleach silver.
> A good mild reducer for removing dichroic fog from film can be made by
> adding about 15 grams per liter of citric acid to standard film strength
> rapid fixer. Dichroic fog is a deposit of very fine silver on the surface
> of the film.
> Citric acid, in this application, is a sequestering agent for the
> silver.

While not exactly on topic as per Richard's post, allow me to point out as
per the main topic of B&W film developing that one of the most important
items in the BW darkroom for both film developing and (especially) print
processing is a good audio system. A plain radio is fine, but a tape deck,
a CD player, and especially a MP3 player (with its long play ability) is to
be recommended. For me at least, such a device makes those long and already
enjoyable darkroom sessions that much more enjoyable.


From: G.T. on
Lawrence Akutagawa wrote:
>
>
> While not exactly on topic as per Richard's post, allow me to point out as
> per the main topic of B&W film developing that one of the most important
> items in the BW darkroom for both film developing and (especially) print
> processing is a good audio system. A plain radio is fine, but a tape deck,
> a CD player, and especially a MP3 player (with its long play ability) is to
> be recommended. For me at least, such a device makes those long and already
> enjoyable darkroom sessions that much more enjoyable.

Oh, my last instructor definitely impressed that upon me!

Greg
From: <jjs> on
Lawrence Akutagawa wrote:

> [...] one of the most important items in the BW darkroom for both film
> developing and (especially) print processing is a good audio system.

I have no audio equipment in the darkroom... except a metronome. :)