From: G.T. on
Ken Hart wrote:
> "G.T." <getnews1(a)dslextreme.com> wrote in message
> news:13o36j825t8r910(a)corp.supernews.com...
> snip
>> So in this workflow it would be develop, stop, fix, hypo, wash, and
>> wetting agent? In class we washed prints in hypo but not film.
>>
> Just for the record. "fixer" and "hypo" are basically the same thing. I
> realize that when you say "hypo", you mean "hypo clearing agent"(sometimes
> called "HCA"). The purpose of the hypo clearing agent is to remove the hypo
> or fixer from the film or print.
>
> Back in the 'good old days' when prints were actually paper and not
> resin-coated plastic stuff, the paper print would soak up a lot of
> chemicals. You needed to wash a print for perhaps an hour or so to remove
> all the fixer from the porous paper. (Ricard K., please feel free to jump in
> and correct me or elaborate-- I'm certain you are far more knowledgeable on
> this!). A hypo clearing agent would neutralize the hypo (or fixer), so that
> a shorter wash time (perhaps 30 minutes?) would suffice.
>
> Film, being a non-porous material (or certainly less porous than fiber-based
> prints) doesn't soak up as much chemistry, so a hypo clearing agent is not
> as important. If it's critical to you that your negatives last to the next
> millenia, than you may want to use it anyway...!

Ah, cool, thanks for the clarification.

>
> As for not being able to print at home, there are many people who make do
> with printing in a bathroom. Some use a cart (Rubbermaid? Check office
> supply or food service supply companies.) to hold their enlarger and store
> their chems, trays, and stuff so they can wheel everything into the bathroom
> for a session, then wheel it all into a closet for storage. You can put
> velcro around the window frame and stick a piece of faric or cardboard over
> the window. There is also a gentleman who espouses 'one-tray' processing.
> I've never tried it myself, but perhaps for the temporary darkroom, it may
> be the answer. Maybe someone here can supply the link to his website, or to
> websites for temporary darkrooms. Using the kitchen is also a possibility,
> but some people don't like that idea because of the possibility of food
> being contaminated-- but for darkroom work, cleanliness is important, so
> wipe up those chem spills!
> For me, you can take away my permanent darkrooms when you can pry the
> staticmaster brush from my cold, dead fingers!

Thanks for the tips. I could maybe do it in my kitchen but I'd have to
cover a lot of windows, the kitchen is open to the small living and
dining area. And the bathroom, no, I barely have room to stand in it.

Greg
From: Geoffrey S. Mendelson on
Ken Hart wrote:
> As for not being able to print at home, there are many people who make do
> with printing in a bathroom.

This company makes vertical print processing equipment. You can develop
prints in a very small space with one.

If you are handy with plexiglass and glue, you could probably make a
cheap one from an aquarium. Without a lot of effort, you would have
to lift it up and turn it upside down to empty it, but it may be
good enough.

http://www.novadarkroom.com/cat/31/Print_Processors.html

When I was a teenager, I had to work in a windowless bathroom.
The trays went in the tub, and the enlarger sat on the toilet.

Geoff.
--
Geoffrey S. Mendelson, Jerusalem, Israel gsm(a)mendelson.com N3OWJ/4X1GM
IL Voice: (07)-7424-1667 U.S. Voice: 1-215-821-1838
Visit my 'blog at http://geoffstechno.livejournal.com/
From: David Nebenzahl on
On 1/6/2008 9:13 PM Ken Hart spake thus:

> Back in the 'good old days' when prints were actually paper and not
> resin-coated plastic stuff, the paper print would soak up a lot of
> chemicals. You needed to wash a print for perhaps an hour or so to remove
> all the fixer from the porous paper. (Ricard K., please feel free to jump in
> and correct me or elaborate-- I'm certain you are far more knowledgeable on
> this!). A hypo clearing agent would neutralize the hypo (or fixer), so that
> a shorter wash time (perhaps 30 minutes?) would suffice.

Just a small nit: HCA doesn't "neutralize" fixer, it sets up conditions
that make it easier to remove it. As you said, Richard K. can supply all
the gory details.
From: Rob Morley on
In article <13o3edgqdla9j1f(a)corp.supernews.com>, G.T.
getnews1(a)dslextreme.com says...

> Thanks for the tips. I could maybe do it in my kitchen but I'd have to
> cover a lot of windows, the kitchen is open to the small living and
> dining area. And the bathroom, no, I barely have room to stand in it.
>
As long as there's somewhee to stand the enlarger that's all you really
need - expose the paper, load it in a drum and then process it in the
kitchen in normal light.
From: G.T. on
Rob Morley wrote:
> In article <13o3edgqdla9j1f(a)corp.supernews.com>, G.T.
> getnews1(a)dslextreme.com says...
>
>> Thanks for the tips. I could maybe do it in my kitchen but I'd have to
>> cover a lot of windows, the kitchen is open to the small living and
>> dining area. And the bathroom, no, I barely have room to stand in it.
>>
> As long as there's somewhee to stand the enlarger that's all you really
> need - expose the paper, load it in a drum and then process it in the
> kitchen in normal light.

Can you point me to daylight print processing equipment? I've been
doing a little Googling but haven't found anything definitive yet, and
when I do, I still won't know what workflow works best.

If I were to use a drum what would I need? Is it similar to processing
film?

Print, load in drum, fill with developer, agitate, empty developer, fill
with stop and agitate, empty, fill with fixer and agitate, empty. Then
hypo clear, wash, and dry?

Would the last paragraph be considered the one tray method?

Thanks,
Greg