From: Ron Hunter on
SMS wrote:
> Ron Hunter wrote:
>
>> The battery meter on my Motorola cell phone is virtually useless. It
>> indicates full charge one day, and without talking on it, will be flat
>> to the point of shutdown the next.
>
> We have only Motorola cell phones, and the battery meters work just
> fine. However there are instances where the situation you describe
> happens, even with a good battery. It's especially an issue if you keep
> your phone in a place where it can't get a good signal. I.e., my wife
> would stick her tri-mode phone in a metal desk drawer, where it would
> either switch to AMPS and quickly run down the battery, or if it could
> get a digital signal it would increase the power to compensate for the
> weaker signal.
>

Yes, I have the problem when I visit my father-in-law. He lives in a
rural area with poor coverage by my provider, and the battery will run
down in a day or so just waiting on a call since it has to use full
power just to do the periodic 'identification' process so the cell
system knows where to direct calls.
Leaving the Bluetooth on will also drain the battery faster.
From: ASAAR on
On Mon, 25 Jun 2007 04:07:06 -0500, Ron Hunter wrote:

>>> The battery meter on my Motorola cell phone is virtually useless. It
>>> indicates full charge one day, and without talking on it, will be flat
>>> to the point of shutdown the next.
>>
>> We have only Motorola cell phones, and the battery meters work just
>> fine. However there are instances where the situation you describe
>> happens, even with a good battery. It's especially an issue if you keep
>> your phone in a place where it can't get a good signal. I.e., my wife
>> would stick her tri-mode phone in a metal desk drawer, where it would
>> either switch to AMPS and quickly run down the battery, or if it could
>> get a digital signal it would increase the power to compensate for the
>> weaker signal.
>>
>
> Yes, I have the problem when I visit my father-in-law. He lives in a
> rural area with poor coverage by my provider, and the battery will run
> down in a day or so just waiting on a call since it has to use full
> power just to do the periodic 'identification' process so the cell
> system knows where to direct calls.
> Leaving the Bluetooth on will also drain the battery faster.

Then it appears that your cell phone's battery meter is
functioning as well as could be expected. The only problem being
that you aren't checking the meter often enough, probably because
like most mammals, you need to sleep every once in awhile. <g>

From: SMS on
Ron Hunter wrote:

> Yes, I have the problem when I visit my father-in-law. He lives in a
> rural area with poor coverage by my provider, and the battery will run
> down in a day or so just waiting on a call since it has to use full
> power just to do the periodic 'identification' process so the cell
> system knows where to direct calls.
> Leaving the Bluetooth on will also drain the battery faster.

OTOH, it's rather nice to have coverage, even at the expense of shorter
battery life.

I just spent a week in southern Oregon, at two national parks, and at
one resort in the woods between Klamath Falls and Medford. In each area
there was no GSM coverage available, but I could always get a CDMA or
AMPS signal. Crater Lake National Park is well covered by the older,
higher power, AMPS system, while there is very little GSM or CDMA
coverage. You just have to remember to keep your phone off if you're
spending very long periods of time unconnected from the charger.
From: Mr.Bolshoyhuy on
> > > >which is the best type of battery to use ?
For future
> > reference, never buy a camera that takes anything other that a lithium
> > ion battery; you'll be much happier. Good luck.
>
> In my experience, totally wrong!
> Rechargeable AA NimH batteries are fantastic as to life in the camera
> and cost.

cost? ok, I bought Li-ion NP-20 for $0.99c from eBay new;however, s/h
was $5.99 LOL! The charger was $5. 45min to charge. Anyway better
value than 4 NiMh for $15. With NiMh AA you end up mxing up
batteries. One could have a lower charge than another. Fool's advice
is to mark them... LOL!
The real good NiMh chargers which check voltage of each battery and
have individual LCDs are mucho mucho $$$.

Stick either with Lithium AA or Li-ion.

From: SMS on
Mr.Bolshoyhuy wrote:
>>>>> which is the best type of battery to use ?
> For future
>>> reference, never buy a camera that takes anything other that a lithium
>>> ion battery; you'll be much happier. Good luck.
>> In my experience, totally wrong!
>> Rechargeable AA NimH batteries are fantastic as to life in the camera
>> and cost.
>
> cost? ok, I bought Li-ion NP-20 for $0.99c from eBay new;however, s/h
> was $5.99 LOL!

The reason sellers do this is because of the eBay commission structure.

The charger was $5. 45min to charge. Anyway better
> value than 4 NiMh for $15.

Actual cost for four good NiMH batteries is about $10

> With NiMh AA you end up mxing up
> batteries. One could have a lower charge than another. Fool's advice
> is to mark them... LOL!

If you're using a charger that charges each cell individually, and fully
charge the cells, the differences are inconsequential. However, as you
point out, it's rather a pain to keep track of the different sets of AA
cells. I mark them with a Sharpie marker, some people buy different
brands of batteries, some people paint colored dots on them.

> The real good NiMh chargers which check voltage of each battery and
> have individual LCDs are mucho mucho $$$.

There are inexpensive chargers which charge each cell individually.
While the chargers with an LCD that indicates the level of each cell may
be interesting, they really are unnecessary.

> Stick either with Lithium AA or Li-ion.

This is what all the experts say, though not for the reasons you stated,
other than the "mixing up" reason which can be worked around with a
little effort.

The actual reasons to avoid NiMH if possible are:

-High Self-Discharge Rate
-Lower Number of Charge/Discharge Cycles
-Lower Energy Density by Weight and Volume
-Inconvenience of charging and swapping and keeping track of multiple
packs of multiple cells
-Poor Cold weather performance
-Lower reliability of devices that use them
-Lower reliability of batteries over long periods of non-use
-No protection circuitry
-No accurate charge level indication in device is possible