From: SMS on
GMAN wrote:

>> But here's a list:
>>
>> -High Self-Discharge Rate
>> -Lower Number of Charge/Discharge Cycles
>> -Lower Energy Density by Weight and Volume
>> -Inconvenience of charging and swapping and keeping track of multiple
>> packs of multiple cells
>> -Poor Cold weather performance
>> -Lower reliability of devices that use them
>> -Lower reliability of batteries over long periods of non-use
>> -No protection circuitry
>> -No accurate charge level indication in device is possible
>>
>
> There is enough bullshit above to start a fertilizer farm!!!!

LOL, maybe you'd like to point out anything there that isn't true.
Didn't think so.
From: ASAAR on
On 25 Jun 2007 10:34:29 -0700, the SMS nitrogen factory emitted:

>> There is enough bullshit above to start a fertilizer farm!!!!
>
> LOL, maybe you'd like to point out anything there that isn't true.
> Didn't think so.

I've pointed out your spin and mistruths quite often to all of
your points, and not long after I started doing so, you either
stopped reading my replies or are faking it. The question should be
"Can you handle the truth?". Don't think so.

From: Thomas T. Veldhouse on
SMS <scharf.steven(a)geemail.com> wrote:
>
> There are inexpensive chargers which charge each cell individually.
> While the chargers with an LCD that indicates the level of each cell may
> be interesting, they really are unnecessary.
>

But very useful! I rate all my batteries by capacity and then put the
batteries that are the closest in capacity together with each other in series
in the same device [if they are in parallel it won't matter as the voltage
will drop properly]. With the top chargers, you can rate capacity at the load
of your choice [i.e. discharge at 1.0A] so that the ratings most track your
usage pattern. Keeping batteries of similar capacity together helps avoid the
issue of polarity flips that can occur when one battery goes dead in a series
prior to others.

--
Thomas T. Veldhouse

Eat drink and be merry, for tomorrow they may make it illegal.

From: Thomas T. Veldhouse on
SMS <scharf.steven(a)geemail.com> wrote:
> GMAN wrote:
>
>>> But here's a list:
>>>
>>> -High Self-Discharge Rate
>>> -Lower Number of Charge/Discharge Cycles
>>> -Lower Energy Density by Weight and Volume
>>> -Inconvenience of charging and swapping and keeping track of multiple
>>> packs of multiple cells
>>> -Poor Cold weather performance
>>> -Lower reliability of devices that use them
>>> -Lower reliability of batteries over long periods of non-use
>>> -No protection circuitry
>>> -No accurate charge level indication in device is possible
>>>
>>
>> There is enough bullshit above to start a fertilizer farm!!!!
>
> LOL, maybe you'd like to point out anything there that isn't true.
> Didn't think so.

Lower number of charge/discharge cycles is almost certainly incorrect unless
you abuse the battery or run the batteries down each day every day of the
year.

The incovenience of charging and swapping ... is not related to battery
chemistry one bit; it is related to the usage pattern of the owner and is
equally an issue for all battery chemistries.

Lower reliablity of devices that use them is flat wrong. If a device is not
capable of determining the batteries are delivering too low of power to
prevent damage to the device, then NiMH and LiIon are equally unreliable in
that device. If you use NiMH batteries in series in modern electronics, the
risk is only to the battery and not to the device; and that risk being a
complete discharge and polarity reversal; which is almost impossible with a
two battery series or less.

Lower reliability of batteries over long periods of non-use is also not true
for NiMH, but it IS true for LiIon. So in fact, you have it backward. NiMH
can be charged properly from zero charge. LiIon will lose overall life if
fully discharged. To make matters worse, LiIon batteries have a fixed useful
life of about two years [anything beyond that is gravy and a good amount of
luck .. or you just don't use much power to be incovenienced by the lower
capacity]. The new low self-discharge batteries take years to fully
discharge, so even if NiMH batteries were affected by a complete discharge, it
is no longer practical for that state to even occur [a LiIon battery would
become worthless even if not used before one of these batteries were to fully
discharge].

Poor cold weather performance is realtive I guess. LiIon batteries fair not
much better. If you want cold weather performance then you have to pick Li
batteries (not Li-Ion). I live in Minnesota, and the number of times that I
have had to worry about it are quite few and if it mattered, I would buy
Lithium batteries for these extreme occasions and use NiMH the rest of the
time. In fact, the only case where it does matter is my Nikon D200 and that
ONLY takes proprietary Li-Ion battery unless you put on a custom grip.


--
Thomas T. Veldhouse

Eat drink and be merry, for tomorrow they may make it illegal.

From: Thomas T. Veldhouse on
ASAAR <caught(a)22.com> wrote:
> On 25 Jun 2007 10:34:29 -0700, the SMS nitrogen factory emitted:
>
>>> There is enough bullshit above to start a fertilizer farm!!!!
>>
>> LOL, maybe you'd like to point out anything there that isn't true.
>> Didn't think so.
>
> I've pointed out your spin and mistruths quite often to all of
> your points, and not long after I started doing so, you either
> stopped reading my replies or are faking it. The question should be
> "Can you handle the truth?". Don't think so.
>

I also saw you point out some of the inaccuracies in this very thread ... and
you are correct, mostly silence.

--
Thomas T. Veldhouse

Eat drink and be merry, for tomorrow they may make it illegal.