From: Ron Hunter on
ray wrote:
> On Sun, 10 Jun 2007 14:05:02 -0700, Daytona wrote:
>
>> My 4 cheap nicad battaries have failed after only about 10 cycles, at
>> least, the power output on 1 is well down and the net result is that I
>> can only manage 2 pictures. Since I don't use my camera that often,
>> which is the best type of battery to use ?
>>
>> I've got a cheap 2 hour fast charger and I'm wondering whether that
>> could be part of the problem, as before I used to have a trickle
>> charger. I bought cheap stuff 2 years ago because I thought that NiCd
>> was established technology and so price didn't make much difference to
>> quality.
>>
>> I was looking at converting to NiMH and using the La Crosse BC 900 /
>> LaCrosse RS900 / Technoline iCharger as at least it gives some
>> information on the battery condition.
>>
>> I don't really understand what I need, so any thoughts would be
>> appreciated :-)
>>
>> Daytona
>
> The new nihm's from Sanyo (Enerloop) and RayOvac (hybrid) are said to have
> solved the 'shelf life' problem. I would suggest you also look at Lithium
> (non-rechargeable) batteries as a solution. Since you indicate that you
> use it sparingly, this would seem to be a good answer, though the
> batteries are somewhat expensive, they last a long time and have excellent
> power density (i.e. lots of shots). nicd's are basically not a good
> solution for digital photography.
>
My wife's camera has disposable lithium batteries installed. They have
been the camera since Christmas, and we have taken the camera on two
trips since then, and taken a couple of hundred pictures, with the LCD
on all the time, and reviewed them often, and it continues to take
pictures. When these batteries die, I will install the Eneloop
batteries and see how they work in her sporadically used camera.
From: Ron Hunter on
Morton wrote:
> Daytona wrote:
>> On 10 Jun, 22:28, cassia <cassiaden...(a)gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>>> These are just AA right? So far, I've had the BEST experience with the
>>> Duracell Ultra Digital batteries. I use them in my flash (the SB800)
>>> and the recycle time and life has been dramatically better. For future
>>> reference, never buy a camera that takes anything other that a lithium
>>> ion battery; you'll be much happier. Good luck.
>>
>> Yes they're AA, I've just checked and the camera can take NiMH, but I
>> don't know about lithium - are they better ?
>>
>> Daytona
>>
>
> Be careful with Lithium AA batteries. They are capable of a high current
> surge that can damage your electronic circuits, unless your owner's
> manual specifically says that Lithium AAs are OK.
> Morton
Yes, and DON'T drop them into a pocket with your keys, coins, etc. Even
'dead' ones can cause a rather painful problem should they become
'shorted' in a pocket!
Been there, done that!
From: ASAAR on
On Sun, 10 Jun 2007 14:05:02 -0700, Daytona wrote:

> My 4 cheap nicad battaries have failed after only about 10 cycles, at
> least, the power output on 1 is well down and the net result is that I
> can only manage 2 pictures. Since I don't use my camera that often,
> which is the best type of battery to use ?
>
> I've got a cheap 2 hour fast charger and I'm wondering whether that
> could be part of the problem, as before I used to have a trickle
> charger. I bought cheap stuff 2 years ago because I thought that NiCd
> was established technology and so price didn't make much difference to
> quality.
>
> I was looking at converting to NiMH and using the La Crosse BC 900 /
> LaCrosse RS900 / Technoline iCharger as at least it gives some
> information on the battery condition.

You really shouldn't use AA NiCd batteries. Even back when Canon
introduced the A70 in 2003, NiMH AA cells were probably recommended.
Today's NiMH batteries should be good for at least double and
possibly 3 times the number of shots that NiCd batteries can
manage. Check the mAh rating, which should be printed in small type
on the NiCD case. For reference, you should be able to buy NiMH
batteries virtually everywhere that have capacities from 2500 to
2700mAh. The last time I checked, NiCD batteries had capacities of
from 900 to 1000 mAh.

If your charger is old enough, it might be compatible with NiCd
batteries. Some of the earlier "smart" chargers could automatically
detect the difference between NiCD and NiMH, but others needed for
the user to use a switch to tell the charger which type was being
charged. Many current chargers assume that only NiMH batteries will
be charged, and if they're not smart enough to detect NiCd
batteries, might charge them at a high enough rate to cause
overheating damage. BTW, I have an old Radio Shack NiCD "Fast
Charger", and it took 6 hours to charge the NiCds. If your 2 hour
charger detected NiCd batteries, to charge them safely it should
either slow the charge rate so as to take about 6 hours to charge
them, or if it assumed that the NiCd batteries could take a fast
charge, it would only need about 40 minutes to fully charge them,
not two full hours. If it really charged the NiCD batteries for 2
hours at the NiMH charge rate, they've probably been cooked to
death, which would explain why the provided such poor performance
after only 10 charge cycles. NiCd and NiMH batteries should be good
for many hundreds of charge cycles if they're used and charged
properly.

According to DPReview's test of the A70, using the low capacity
NiMH batteries that were commonly available back in 2003 (1600mAh)
they were able to get 515 shots using their own custom test
procedure. This consisted of taking 4 shots without using the
flash, waiting two minutes, taking one shot using the flash, waiting
another minute, and repeating. I you use 2,700 mAh NiMH cells, that
number should rise to about 850 shots per charge. Canon's A###
series cameras are/were known to be efficient, and since you don't
use the camera very often, why not try using plain old alkaline AA
batteries. They won't last as long as NiMH, but in the A70 they
should be good for close to 400 shots using the same procedure
DPReview used. If most of your shots use the flash, alkalines might
struggle to reach 100 shots, but if all of your shots are taken
outdoors, especially if you use the viewfinder instead of the LCD,
alkalines might easily be good for more than 600 shots per set.

The LaCrosse is a nice charger, but it's really overkill for the
A70, even if you switch to using NiMH batteries. And rechargeable
batteries should *not* be needed unless you use the flash quite
often. If that's the case, almost any halfway decent "smart"
charger should be good enough, if it has independent charge circuits
for each cell. The chargers to avoid are the ones that only can
charge two or four cells at a time.

My Fuji camera is similar to your A70, and when I got it two 1/2
years ago used to travel with 2 or 3 sets of charged NiMH batteries.
I don't any more, as it's able to take many hundreds of shots over
several days without needing to replace the first set of batteries
with a fresh set. Now I either bring no backup battery sets if I
don't think I'll take more than 200 shots, but if I think that I
might take more than 400, I'll bring along either one additional set
of charged NiMH batteries or a set of alkalines. If you do use the
flash a lot, the Eneloop type NiMH batteries mentioned by in several
other replies would be a good choice since they don't lose much of
their charge if the camera sits in a drawer for many month between
uses. If you don't use the flash much, alkalines (and even the
fairly expensive Lithium AA batteries) would probably be the most
convenient, cost effective solution for you.

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/canona70/page9.asp


From: Al, Cambridge, UK on
On Jun 10, 10:05 pm, Daytona <junk721...(a)hotmail.com> wrote:
> My 4 cheap nicad battaries have failed after only about 10 cycles, at
> least, the power output on 1 is well down and the net result is that I
> can only manage 2 pictures. Since I don't use my camera that often,
> which is the best type of battery to use ?
>
> I've got a cheap 2 hour fast charger and I'm wondering whether that
> could be part of the problem, as before I used to have a trickle
> charger. I bought cheap stuff 2 years ago because I thought that NiCd
> was established technology and so price didn't make much difference to
> quality.
>
> I was looking at converting to NiMH and using the La Crosse BC 900 /
> LaCrosse RS900 / Technoline iCharger as at least it gives some
> information on the battery condition.
>
> I don't really understand what I need, so any thoughts would be
> appreciated :-)
>
> Daytona

You could try charging your cells one at a time - if a single cell has
run out further than the others, the charger may be switching off
before that cell finishes charging because one of the others has
reached full charge.

From: Daytona on
On 11 Jun, 01:05, ransley <Mark_Rans...(a)Yahoo.com> wrote:

>Get a good charger to get the most out of
> them

Thanks everyone for all the replies !

How do I know what is and what isn't a good charger ? I was thinking
of getting the LaCrosse charger because everyone seems to think that
it's good and since hopefully it's going to last a long time, I don't
mind the relatively high price (£38/$74).

I'm in the UK, so I don't know whether some of the batteries mentioned
are available, but at least I know the kind of thing to look for. Am I
correct in thinking that generally, Sanyo and Sanyo rebranded
batteries are good ?

Daytona