From: SMS on
Ron Hunter wrote:
> Daytona wrote:
>> On 10 Jun, 22:28, cassia <cassiaden...(a)gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>>> These are just AA right? So far, I've had the BEST experience with the
>>> Duracell Ultra Digital batteries. I use them in my flash (the SB800)
>>> and the recycle time and life has been dramatically better. For future
>>> reference, never buy a camera that takes anything other that a lithium
>>> ion battery; you'll be much happier. Good luck.
>>
>> Yes they're AA, I've just checked and the camera can take NiMH, but I
>> don't know about lithium - are they better ?
>>
>> Daytona
>>
> There are lithium AA batteries, and there are litiium ion batteries. The
> lithium ion batteries are a nominal 3.7 volts, and are not suitable for
> use in cameras made for AA batteries, but there are lithium disposables
> which are, and they work very will in most equipment. There are
> advantages to lithium ion batteries, such as low weight, and long use
> life, and slow self-discharge rates, cold weather performance, etc., but
> availability is not good since most of them are proprietary.

While it's true that you can't buy them in "the middle of nowhere," most
Li-Ion packs have multiple sources, including after-market brands that
are not expensive. The advantages of Li-Ion batteries for cameras are
overwhelming, except it costs the manufacturer more to provide a battery
and charger at time of sale, so the cheaper cameras use AAs.
From: Allen on
SMS wrote:
<snip>
> Yeah, that's the bottom line, though the low-end cameras like the Canom
> A series use AA batteries because it saves the manufacturer money. With
> the Sanyo eneloop batteries, at least one of the many problems of AA
> batteries is solved (self-discharge) though the other problems remain.

Please list at least some of the "many problems" of AA batteries.
Allen
From: SMS on
Allen wrote:
> SMS wrote:
> <snip>
>> Yeah, that's the bottom line, though the low-end cameras like the
>> Canom A series use AA batteries because it saves the manufacturer
>> money. With the Sanyo eneloop batteries, at least one of the many
>> problems of AA batteries is solved (self-discharge) though the other
>> problems remain.
>
> Please list at least some of the "many problems" of AA batteries.
> Allen

See "http://batterydata.com". In the table of contents click on
"Advantages of Li-Ion Batteries/Disadvantages of NiMH batteries (AA/AAA)"

But here's a list:

-High Self-Discharge Rate
-Lower Number of Charge/Discharge Cycles
-Lower Energy Density by Weight and Volume
-Inconvenience of charging and swapping and keeping track of multiple
packs of multiple cells
-Poor Cold weather performance
-Lower reliability of devices that use them
-Lower reliability of batteries over long periods of non-use
-No protection circuitry
-No accurate charge level indication in device is possible

I do have cameras that use AA batteries, as well as ones that use Li-Ion
batteries. While I've learned to "never say never," it'd be highly
unlikely that I'd buy another camera that used AA batteries.

The advantages of Li-Ion are overwhelming, while the sole advantage of
AA is that if you find yourself ITMON (in the middle of nowhere) with no
vehicle and no AC power, you can always buy some AA batteries at that
little country store.

Even the price of AA batteries isn't really an advantage if you look at
the big picture. As long as the camera you use has after-market Li-Ion
packs available, the price difference is small to non-existent.

It's not for no reason that all the high end cameras use Li-Ion, not to
mention all cell phones, PDAs, laptop computers, etc. Even some high end
flashlights and bicycle lights now use Li-Ion rechargeables.
From: Thomas T. Veldhouse on
Daytona <junk721176(a)hotmail.com> wrote:
>
> I was looking at converting to NiMH and using the La Crosse BC 900 /
> LaCrosse RS900 / Technoline iCharger as at least it gives some
> information on the battery condition.
>
> I don't really understand what I need, so any thoughts would be
> appreciated :-)
>

Get the Maha MH-C9000 (Powerex) charger; you will be much happier.

As for that. If you use your flash a lot and often, then look at PowerEx or
Sanyo 2700mAh NiMH batteries. If you tend to leave your flash unused for a
couple weeks at a time, I would consider buying the low discharge batteries.
I own several Rayovac Hybrid 2100mAh batteries and several Sanyo Eneloop
2000mAh batteries. Both of these batteries tend to exceed the rated
capacities on most cases, however I did more variance with the Rayovac
batteries. These should hold a charge between uses even when months apart.

--
Thomas T. Veldhouse

If you took all of the grains of sand in the world, and lined
them up end to end in a row, you'd be working for the government!
-- Mr. Interesting


From: Thomas T. Veldhouse on
Thomas T. Veldhouse <veldy71(a)yahoo.com> wrote:
> Daytona <junk721176(a)hotmail.com> wrote:
>>
>> I was looking at converting to NiMH and using the La Crosse BC 900 /
>> LaCrosse RS900 / Technoline iCharger as at least it gives some
>> information on the battery condition.
>>
>> I don't really understand what I need, so any thoughts would be
>> appreciated :-)
>>
>
> Get the Maha MH-C9000 (Powerex) charger; you will be much happier.
>
> As for that. If you use your flash a lot and often, then look at PowerEx or
> Sanyo 2700mAh NiMH batteries. If you tend to leave your flash unused for a
> couple weeks at a time, I would consider buying the low discharge batteries.
> I own several Rayovac Hybrid 2100mAh batteries and several Sanyo Eneloop
> 2000mAh batteries. Both of these batteries tend to exceed the rated
> capacities on most cases, however I did more variance with the Rayovac
> batteries. These should hold a charge between uses even when months apart.
>

I referenced your "flash" above as I read another users post first, which
indicates a flash. Substitute "camera" where I say flash and the rest
applies.

--
Thomas T. Veldhouse

If you took all of the grains of sand in the world, and lined
them up end to end in a row, you'd be working for the government!
-- Mr. Interesting