From: GMAN on
In article <466eb2dd$0$27204$742ec2ed(a)news.sonic.net>, SMS <scharf.steven(a)geemail.com> wrote:
>Allen wrote:
>> SMS wrote:
>> <snip>
>>> Yeah, that's the bottom line, though the low-end cameras like the
>>> Canom A series use AA batteries because it saves the manufacturer
>>> money. With the Sanyo eneloop batteries, at least one of the many
>>> problems of AA batteries is solved (self-discharge) though the other
>>> problems remain.
>>
>> Please list at least some of the "many problems" of AA batteries.
>> Allen
>
>See "http://batterydata.com". In the table of contents click on
>"Advantages of Li-Ion Batteries/Disadvantages of NiMH batteries (AA/AAA)"
>
>But here's a list:
>
>-High Self-Discharge Rate
>-Lower Number of Charge/Discharge Cycles
>-Lower Energy Density by Weight and Volume
>-Inconvenience of charging and swapping and keeping track of multiple
>packs of multiple cells
>-Poor Cold weather performance
>-Lower reliability of devices that use them
>-Lower reliability of batteries over long periods of non-use
>-No protection circuitry
>-No accurate charge level indication in device is possible
>

There is enough bullshit above to start a fertilizer farm!!!!

>I do have cameras that use AA batteries, as well as ones that use Li-Ion
>batteries. While I've learned to "never say never," it'd be highly
>unlikely that I'd buy another camera that used AA batteries.

Who cares!

>
>The advantages of Li-Ion are overwhelming, while the sole advantage of
>AA is that if you find yourself ITMON (in the middle of nowhere) with no
>vehicle and no AC power, you can always buy some AA batteries at that
>little country store.


>
>Even the price of AA batteries isn't really an advantage if you look at
>the big picture. As long as the camera you use has after-market Li-Ion
>packs available, the price difference is small to non-existent.
>
>It's not for no reason that all the high end cameras use Li-Ion, not to
>mention all cell phones, PDAs, laptop computers, etc. Even some high end
>flashlights and bicycle lights now use Li-Ion rechargeables.


From: John Turco on
SMS wrote:

<heavily edited, for brevity>

> It's not for no reason that all the high end cameras use Li-Ion, not to
> mention all cell phones, PDAs, laptop computers, etc. Even some
> high end flashlights and bicycle lights now use Li-Ion rechargeables.


Hello, Steven:

Wow, I guess my tiny Kodak V603 is a "high end camera," then, as it
takes a proprietary Li-Ion pack. Wonder why it only cost me $124.98
USD (on clearance, at the local Target store), in April? <g>


Cordially,
John Turco <jtur(a)concentric.net>

From: ASAAR on
On Fri, 22 Jun 2007 21:01:12 -0700, John Turco wrote:

>> It's not for no reason that all the high end cameras use Li-Ion, not to
>> mention all cell phones, PDAs, laptop computers, etc. Even some
>> high end flashlights and bicycle lights now use Li-Ion rechargeables.
>
> Wow, I guess my tiny Kodak V603 is a "high end camera," then, as it
> takes a proprietary Li-Ion pack. Wonder why it only cost me $124.98
> USD (on clearance, at the local Target store), in April? <g>

When you've got that figured out, then help me understand why my
'high end' cell phone + Li-Ion battery + charger cost only $15. :)
As usual, SMS's reasons hold little water. In fact, the reason why
I upgraded my last cell phone was because the carrier no longer was
able to supply a replacement Li-Ion battery for it. Now that I
think of it, his other canard, that due to their flat voltage curve,
NiMH batteries can't have usable battery meters also doesn't hold
up. My first two Nokia cell phones used proprietary NiMH battery
packs and their battery meters were just as accurate as the ones in
my current Li-Ion powered cell phones.

From: Ron Hunter on
ASAAR wrote:
> On Fri, 22 Jun 2007 21:01:12 -0700, John Turco wrote:
>
>>> It's not for no reason that all the high end cameras use Li-Ion, not to
>>> mention all cell phones, PDAs, laptop computers, etc. Even some
>>> high end flashlights and bicycle lights now use Li-Ion rechargeables.
>> Wow, I guess my tiny Kodak V603 is a "high end camera," then, as it
>> takes a proprietary Li-Ion pack. Wonder why it only cost me $124.98
>> USD (on clearance, at the local Target store), in April? <g>
>
> When you've got that figured out, then help me understand why my
> 'high end' cell phone + Li-Ion battery + charger cost only $15. :)
> As usual, SMS's reasons hold little water. In fact, the reason why
> I upgraded my last cell phone was because the carrier no longer was
> able to supply a replacement Li-Ion battery for it. Now that I
> think of it, his other canard, that due to their flat voltage curve,
> NiMH batteries can't have usable battery meters also doesn't hold
> up. My first two Nokia cell phones used proprietary NiMH battery
> packs and their battery meters were just as accurate as the ones in
> my current Li-Ion powered cell phones.
>
The battery meter on my Motorola cell phone is virtually useless. It
indicates full charge one day, and without talking on it, will be flat
to the point of shutdown the next.
From: ASAAR on
On Sat, 23 Jun 2007 02:26:41 -0500, Ron Hunter wrote:

>> When you've got that figured out, then help me understand why my
>> 'high end' cell phone + Li-Ion battery + charger cost only $15. :)
>> As usual, SMS's reasons hold little water. In fact, the reason why
>> I upgraded my last cell phone was because the carrier no longer was
>> able to supply a replacement Li-Ion battery for it. Now that I
>> think of it, his other canard, that due to their flat voltage curve,
>> NiMH batteries can't have usable battery meters also doesn't hold
>> up. My first two Nokia cell phones used proprietary NiMH battery
>> packs and their battery meters were just as accurate as the ones in
>> my current Li-Ion powered cell phones.
>>
> The battery meter on my Motorola cell phone is virtually useless. It
> indicates full charge one day, and without talking on it, will be flat
> to the point of shutdown the next.

When my last cell phone did that, it wasn't due to the battery
meter malfunctioning. The Li-Ion battery had lost most of its
capacity. Have you tried a new battery yet, or do you mean that
when the meter indicates that the battery is flat that the battery
really isn't, and is still able to power the cell phone for at least
several more days?