From: Ron Hunter on
ASAAR wrote:
> On Sat, 23 Jun 2007 02:26:41 -0500, Ron Hunter wrote:
>
>>> When you've got that figured out, then help me understand why my
>>> 'high end' cell phone + Li-Ion battery + charger cost only $15. :)
>>> As usual, SMS's reasons hold little water. In fact, the reason why
>>> I upgraded my last cell phone was because the carrier no longer was
>>> able to supply a replacement Li-Ion battery for it. Now that I
>>> think of it, his other canard, that due to their flat voltage curve,
>>> NiMH batteries can't have usable battery meters also doesn't hold
>>> up. My first two Nokia cell phones used proprietary NiMH battery
>>> packs and their battery meters were just as accurate as the ones in
>>> my current Li-Ion powered cell phones.
>>>
>> The battery meter on my Motorola cell phone is virtually useless. It
>> indicates full charge one day, and without talking on it, will be flat
>> to the point of shutdown the next.
>
> When my last cell phone did that, it wasn't due to the battery
> meter malfunctioning. The Li-Ion battery had lost most of its
> capacity. Have you tried a new battery yet, or do you mean that
> when the meter indicates that the battery is flat that the battery
> really isn't, and is still able to power the cell phone for at least
> several more days?
>

No, it shuts down, but the meter read full the day before. The dropoff
on a LI-ION battery is rather abrupt, it would seem.
From: SMS on
John Turco wrote:
> SMS wrote:
>
> <heavily edited, for brevity>
>
>> It's not for no reason that all the high end cameras use Li-Ion, not to
>> mention all cell phones, PDAs, laptop computers, etc. Even some
>> high end flashlights and bicycle lights now use Li-Ion rechargeables.
>
>
> Hello, Steven:
>
> Wow, I guess my tiny Kodak V603 is a "high end camera," then, as it
> takes a proprietary Li-Ion pack. Wonder why it only cost me $124.98
> USD (on clearance, at the local Target store), in April? <g>

Yes, it's not just high-end cameras that use Li-Ion, the tiny cameras
really have no choice but to use Li-Ion because of size and energy
density issues.

But on the non-tiny cameras, you'll usually find that the higher-end
ones use Li-Ion, and the lower end ones use AA's. There are exceptions
of course.
From: SMS on
Ron Hunter wrote:

> The battery meter on my Motorola cell phone is virtually useless. It
> indicates full charge one day, and without talking on it, will be flat
> to the point of shutdown the next.

We have only Motorola cell phones, and the battery meters work just
fine. However there are instances where the situation you describe
happens, even with a good battery. It's especially an issue if you keep
your phone in a place where it can't get a good signal. I.e., my wife
would stick her tri-mode phone in a metal desk drawer, where it would
either switch to AMPS and quickly run down the battery, or if it could
get a digital signal it would increase the power to compensate for the
weaker signal.

From: SMS on
GMAN wrote:

> Some of us get over 1000 photos with just one set of AA NiMh batteries on our
> S3 IS cameras.

The number of shots per set of batteries is not the issue at all.

> I like Lithium ion but they are very unforgiving of lack of use.

In fact, one of the advantages of Li-Ion is that they are so forgiving
of lack of use.
From: ASAAR on
On Mon, 25 Jun 2007 00:21:36 -0700, SMS wrote:

>> Some of us get over 1000 photos with just one set of AA NiMh batteries
>> on our S3 IS cameras.
>
> The number of shots per set of batteries is not the issue at all.

True, but the OP wanted to know what type of AA batteries to use
in a Canon A70 that gets little use, which is the issue. The
correct answer is alkaline or the new low self-discharge NiMH
batteries. The older NiMH batteries could still be used, but they'd
be slightly less convenient since they might need to be recharged
first if they haven't been charged for over a couple of months. If
a large percentage of the shots need to use the flash, then any NiMH
type would be preferable to alkaline batteries. The A70, btw, is
one of the cameras that can get well over 1,000 shots per charge,
even from the lower capacity, low self-discharge rate Sanyo Eneloop
and RayOVac Hybrid NiMH batteries.


>> I like Lithium ion but they are very unforgiving of lack of use.
>
> In fact, one of the advantages of Li-Ion is that they are so forgiving
> of lack of use.

In fact, you're just spouting your usual Li-Ion propaganda. Due
to their relatively low self-discharge rate, Li-Ion batteries are
pretty good if they often go several months between charges. But
push them too far, such as more than 6 to 9 months between charges,
and unlike other rechargeable types, Li-Ion batteries can fail and
may need to be replaced. The low discharge rate NiMH batteries can
still be used after a year or two since their last charge, which is
attested to by the fact that they're sold pre-charged. That is,
unlike Li-Ion batteries, they can remain on a store's rack for over
a year, and can still be used immediately after purchase without
needing to be charged.