From: Jean-David Beyer on
Richard Knoppow wrote:

> Amidol has always been considered a cold or neutral
> tone developer but, like other developers, the image color
> depends on the activity of the developer and its other
> contents. I am not sure Amidol has enough special virtues to
> compensate for its high cost, short working life, and
> tendency to produce black stains on anything it drys on
> including your fingernails.
> Ansco/Agfa 113 is a pretty typical Amidol formula.
> There are a lot of them around. Many of the variations have
> to do with trying to extend its tray life. Amidol developers
> must be mixed just before use. One of the virtues, which is
> also a problem, is that the solution does not discolor as it
> becomes exhausted so you can't tell exhausted developer by
> just looking at it.
> For those interested here are a couple of Amidol
> formulas.
>
> Ansco/Agfa 113
> Amidol 6.6 grams
> Sodium sulfite, desiccated 44.0 grams
> Potassium bromide 0.55 gram
> Water to make 1.0 liter
>
> Use full strength.
> Note the small amount of bromide. Amidol produces very
> little developer fog when accelerated with sulfite only. The
> low bromide content also contributes to cold or neutral
> tones but much more bromide can be used if necessary.
>
> Dassonville D-2
> Water, at 70F or 21C 500.0 ml
> Amidol 5.5 grams
> Sodium sulfite, desiccated 16.5 grams
> Potassium bromide 0.6 grams
> Water to make 1.0 liter
>
> Use full strength. Dassonville recommended that exposure be
> timed so that development was complete in 2 minutes at 65F
> to 70F.
>
> Kodak D-51
> Stock Solution
> Water, at 125F or 52C 750.0 ml
> Sodium sulfite, desiccated 120.0 grams
> Amidol 37.5 grams
> Water to make 1.0 liter
>
> For use take 180 ml of the stock solution, 3.0 ml of a 10%
> potassium bromide solution, and 750 ml of water.
> There is no information as to the shelf life of the
> stock solution.
>
> A common addition to Amidol formulas is citric acid
> which is supposed to extend the working life of the
> developer. I am not sure what chemical mechanism this would
> employ. However, the acid would lower the pH a bit lowering
> the activity. Typical tray life is a few hours.
> I used Amidol many years ago and got some very good
> prints with it. If it were not for the high cost of the
> stuff I would recommend trying it. I am pretty sure places
> like Photographer's Formulary carry it. The proper chemical
> name is diaminophenol hydrochloride, it may be easier to
> find that if you are searching chemical manufacturers.
>
I bought a kilogram of the stuff from K&K for a little over US$100 at
least 10 years ago. Anyway, just about the time I stopped using it except to
play around. I notice it is over US$700/kilogram now, depending on where you
get it. Photographer's Formulary has it for way less. On the web I found
references to "red amidol." This makes me nervous as the stuff absolutely
frech are white crystals, though most of it turns light gray pretty soon. If
it gets dark enough, it is probably losing potency. I have no idea why some
should be red.


--
.~. Jean-David Beyer Registered Linux User 85642.
/V\ PGP-Key: 9A2FC99A Registered Machine 241939.
/( )\ Shrewsbury, New Jersey http://counter.li.org
^^-^^ 20:20:01 up 12 days, 2:26, 4 users, load average: 4.23, 4.24, 4.25
From: Richard Knoppow on

"Jean-David Beyer" <jeandavid8(a)verizon.net> wrote in message
news:iQoqk.214$p72.103(a)trnddc05...
> Richard Knoppow wrote:
>
>> Amidol has always been considered a cold or neutral
>> tone developer but, like other developers, the image
>> color
>> depends on the activity of the developer and its other
>> contents. I am not sure Amidol has enough special virtues
>> to
>> compensate for its high cost, short working life, and
>> tendency to produce black stains on anything it drys on
>> including your fingernails.
>> Ansco/Agfa 113 is a pretty typical Amidol formula.
>> There are a lot of them around. Many of the variations
>> have
>> to do with trying to extend its tray life. Amidol
>> developers
>> must be mixed just before use. One of the virtues, which
>> is
>> also a problem, is that the solution does not discolor as
>> it
>> becomes exhausted so you can't tell exhausted developer
>> by
>> just looking at it.
>> For those interested here are a couple of Amidol
>> formulas.
>>
>> Ansco/Agfa 113
>> Amidol 6.6 grams
>> Sodium sulfite, desiccated 44.0 grams
>> Potassium bromide 0.55 gram
>> Water to make 1.0 liter
>>
>> Use full strength.
>> Note the small amount of bromide. Amidol produces very
>> little developer fog when accelerated with sulfite only.
>> The
>> low bromide content also contributes to cold or neutral
>> tones but much more bromide can be used if necessary.
>>
>> Dassonville D-2
>> Water, at 70F or 21C 500.0 ml
>> Amidol 5.5 grams
>> Sodium sulfite, desiccated 16.5 grams
>> Potassium bromide 0.6 grams
>> Water to make 1.0 liter
>>
>> Use full strength. Dassonville recommended that exposure
>> be
>> timed so that development was complete in 2 minutes at
>> 65F
>> to 70F.
>>
>> Kodak D-51
>> Stock Solution
>> Water, at 125F or 52C 750.0 ml
>> Sodium sulfite, desiccated 120.0 grams
>> Amidol 37.5 grams
>> Water to make 1.0 liter
>>
>> For use take 180 ml of the stock solution, 3.0 ml of a
>> 10%
>> potassium bromide solution, and 750 ml of water.
>> There is no information as to the shelf life of the
>> stock solution.
>>
>> A common addition to Amidol formulas is citric acid
>> which is supposed to extend the working life of the
>> developer. I am not sure what chemical mechanism this
>> would
>> employ. However, the acid would lower the pH a bit
>> lowering
>> the activity. Typical tray life is a few hours.
>> I used Amidol many years ago and got some very good
>> prints with it. If it were not for the high cost of the
>> stuff I would recommend trying it. I am pretty sure
>> places
>> like Photographer's Formulary carry it. The proper
>> chemical
>> name is diaminophenol hydrochloride, it may be easier to
>> find that if you are searching chemical manufacturers.
>>
> I bought a kilogram of the stuff from K&K for a little
> over US$100 at
> least 10 years ago. Anyway, just about the time I stopped
> using it except to
> play around. I notice it is over US$700/kilogram now,
> depending on where you
> get it. Photographer's Formulary has it for way less. On
> the web I found
> references to "red amidol." This makes me nervous as the
> stuff absolutely
> frech are white crystals, though most of it turns light
> gray pretty soon. If
> it gets dark enough, it is probably losing potency. I have
> no idea why some
> should be red.
>
>
> --
> .~. Jean-David Beyer Registered Linux User
> 85642.
> /V\ PGP-Key: 9A2FC99A Registered Machine
> 241939.
> /( )\ Shrewsbury, New Jersey http://counter.li.org
> ^^-^^ 20:20:01 up 12 days, 2:26, 4 users, load average:
> 4.23, 4.24, 4.25

I suspect it may be another compound.


--
---
Richard Knoppow
Los Angeles, CA, USA
dickburk(a)ix.netcom.com


From: Jean-David Beyer on
Richard Knoppow wrote:
> "Jean-David Beyer" <jeandavid8(a)verizon.net> wrote in message
> news:iQoqk.214$p72.103(a)trnddc05...
>
>> I bought a kilogram of the stuff from K&K

Oops: I meant ICN.

> for a little
>> over US$100 at least 10 years ago. Anyway, just about the time I
>> stopped using it except to play around. I notice it is over
>> US$700/kilogram now, depending on where you get it. Photographer's
>> Formulary has it for way less. On the web I found references to "red
>> amidol." This makes me nervous as the stuff absolutely frech are white
>> crystals, though most of it turns light gray pretty soon. If it gets
>> dark enough, it is probably losing potency. I have no idea why some
>> should be red.
>>
>
> I suspect it may be another compound.
>
So do I. And I do not know if this is just a harmless impurity, or a cheaper
substitute to deceive the unknowing.


--
.~. Jean-David Beyer Registered Linux User 85642.
/V\ PGP-Key: 9A2FC99A Registered Machine 241939.
/( )\ Shrewsbury, New Jersey http://counter.li.org
^^-^^ 06:00:02 up 12 days, 12:06, 4 users, load average: 4.15, 4.26, 4.26
From: ____ on
I tried Amidol a while back for film development, it produced
well defined negatives of nrmal contrast-two bath development.

I use it now as an addition to PMK developer.

Before I bought from Photo Formulary I would try Artcraft before PF at
this point price wise.



In article <V-WdnUC9VeK6kjfVnZ2dnUVZ_tTinZ2d(a)earthlink.com>,
"Richard Knoppow" <dickburk(a)ix.netcom.com> wrote:


> I used Amidol many years ago and got some very good
> prints with it. If it were not for the high cost of the
> stuff I would recommend trying it. I am pretty sure places
> like Photographer's Formulary carry it. The proper chemical
> name is diaminophenol hydrochloride, it may be easier to
> find that if you are searching chemical manufacturers.
>
>
> --
> ---
> Richard Knoppow
> Los Angeles, CA, USA
> dickburk(a)ix.netcom.com

--
Reality is a picture perfected and never looking back.