From: Keith Tapscott. on

Does anyone know of any true `cold-tone` paper developer recipes, either
MQ or PQ?




--
Keith Tapscott.
From: Richard Knoppow on

"Keith Tapscott." <Keith.Tapscott..2ed4f88(a)photobanter.com>
wrote in message
news:Keith.Tapscott..2ed4f88(a)photobanter.com...
>
> Does anyone know of any true `cold-tone` paper developer
> recipes, either
> MQ or PQ?
>
>
>
>
> --
> Keith Tapscott.

There really isn't such a thing. For the most part the
image color is due to the nature of the emulsion. Those
having relativelly coarse silver grains tend to look bluish,
those with fine grains look yellow or brownish.
PQ developers are supposed to deliver somewhat colder
tones than MQ but there are also warm tone PQ developers.
The main difference in cold and warm tone developers is
activity, cold tone developers tend to have higher pH. The
anti-fog agent will also affect the image color a little: in
general bromide will cause it to be warmer while
benzotriazole will tend to make it cooler. A PQ developer
like Ilford Bromophen will tend to give slightly more
neutral tones than Dektol, an MQ developer.
An example of an old cold tone developer is Kodak D-73,
the formula is below. The formula states it was for Azo and
Ad-Type papers.

Kodak D-73 For Blue-Black Tones

Stock Solution
Water, at about 125F or 52C 500.0 ml
Metol 2.8 grams
Sodium sulfite, dessicated 40.0 grams
Hydroquinone 10.8 grams
Sodium carbonate, anhydrous 75.0 grams
Potassium bromide 0.8 gram
Water to make 1.0 liter

For use dilute one part stock to 2 parts water.
If sodium carbonate, monohydrated is used the amount is
87.5 grams.

If you want good cold or blue black tones toning with a
gold toner will give them to you and produce a very
permanent image. The toner is somewhat expensive but the
amount of gold chloride contained is quite small so its
affordable. Here are a couple of gold toner formulas.

Agfa 231 Gold Toner

Water (at 125F or 52C) 750.0 ml
Ammonium thiocyanate 105.0 grams
or
Sodium thiocyanate 110.0 grams
or
Potassium thiocyanate 135.0 grams
Gold chloride, 1% solution 60.0 ml
Water to make 1.0 liter

At the time this formula was published gold chloride came in
small, sealed ampouls sufficient to make 1.0 liter of a 1%
solution.
Tone well washed prints in this toner until the disirable
tone is reached and then wash.
The image color will depend on the original image color
and to a limited extent on development. Neutral tone paper
will be slightly intensified and the color slightly shifted
to blue. Very warm tone paper will produce a definite blue
color. If used on a print previously toned in a sulfiding
toner the resultant image will be brick red.
Gold toning is a standard treatment for microfilm to
protect the image from oxidation and sulfiding, the
treatment is very effective.


--
---
Richard Knoppow
Los Angeles, CA, USA
dickburk(a)ix.netcom.com






From: Jean-David Beyer on
Keith Tapscott. wrote:
> Does anyone know of any true `cold-tone` paper developer recipes, either
> MQ or PQ?
>
I do not know of any particularly cold one. But what I use is very similar
to Dektol; i.e., D72, but I omit the potassium bromide and use instead 125
millilitres of 1% benzotriazole solution instead (when mixing up 4 litres of
stock D72). It removed the greenish color I got with Ilfobrom (that I no
longer use). So if you want it just ever so slightly cooler than Dektol,
this might do it for you. You may wish to adjust the amount of this you use
to better fit your paper. It will never act like blue toner.

I find it almost impossible to make 1% solutions of benzotriazole, even with
very hot water and stirring for 10 minutes. So what I now do is I bought a
bottle of the bottom of the line house brand vodka at a liquor store
(ethanol in water) and dissolve the benzotriazole in it, then top it up with
the required amount of water. The ethanol does not make much difference
otherwise. If you are a chemist and have absolute alcohol on hand, you could
use that, of course.

If you selenium tone your prints afterwards, I doubt it matters if you use
bzt instead of bromide to begin with.

--
.~. Jean-David Beyer Registered Linux User 85642.
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From: David Nebenzahl on
On 8/17/2008 3:36 AM Jean-David Beyer spake thus:

> I find it almost impossible to make 1% solutions of benzotriazole, even with
> very hot water and stirring for 10 minutes. So what I now do is I bought a
> bottle of the bottom of the line house brand vodka at a liquor store
> (ethanol in water) and dissolve the benzotriazole in it, then top it up with
> the required amount of water.

I love it: vodka developers. So would one use coffee developer in the
am, and vodka developer after 5:00?


--
"In 1964 Barry Goldwater declared: 'Elect me president, and I
will bomb the cities of Vietnam, defoliate the jungles, herd the
population into concentration camps and turn the country into a
wasteland.' But Lyndon Johnson said: 'No! No! No! Don't you dare do
that. Let ME do it.'"

- Characterization (paraphrased) of the 1964 Goldwater/Johnson
presidential race by Professor Irwin Corey, "The World's Foremost
Authority".
From: Jean-David Beyer on
David Nebenzahl wrote:
> On 8/17/2008 3:36 AM Jean-David Beyer spake thus:
>
>> I find it almost impossible to make 1% solutions of benzotriazole, even with
>> very hot water and stirring for 10 minutes. So what I now do is I bought a
>> bottle of the bottom of the line house brand vodka at a liquor store
>> (ethanol in water) and dissolve the benzotriazole in it, then top it up with
>> the required amount of water.
>
> I love it: vodka developers. So would one use coffee developer in the
> am, and vodka developer after 5:00?
>
>
Maybe, but if you do not like a lot of chemicals, why not use Kahlua all the
time?

--
.~. Jean-David Beyer Registered Linux User 85642.
/V\ PGP-Key: 9A2FC99A Registered Machine 241939.
/( )\ Shrewsbury, New Jersey http://counter.li.org
^^-^^ 18:25:01 up 11 days, 31 min, 4 users, load average: 4.39, 4.29, 4.27