From: Bruce on
On Sat, 30 Jan 2010 08:08:35 -0800, Savageduck
<savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:

>On 2010-01-30 02:19:17 -0800, "G Paleologopoulos"
><gpaleo(a)ath.forthnet.gr> said:
>>
>> How do you spell D7000?
>> ;-))
>
>I will probably be wrong, but what I think is, Nikon would be foolish
>to throw away all the good PR and model name recognition the D90 has
>gained through its lifecycle.
>
>Like the D300/D300s and D3/D3x/D3s, I think any modifications or
>upgrades to the D90 or D700 would, or should be named with the addition
>of a postscript letter, rather than a totally new model designation.


I disagree. The D90 is at the top of Nikon's range of consumer DSLRs,
separate from the prosumer D300 and D700 and the pro D3s/x.

Nikon has clearly decided to number its consumer DSLRs in the Dx000
series, so the logical successor to the D90 would be numbered in that
series, with a value of "x" that is greater than 5.

D7000 would therefore be quite logical.

From: Neil Harrington on
Savageduck wrote:
> On 2010-01-30 02:19:17 -0800, "G Paleologopoulos"
> <gpaleo(a)ath.forthnet.gr> said:
>
>> "Neil Harrington" <never(a)home.com> wrote
>> news:btKdnaG0ltj04_7WnZ2dnUVZ_uWdnZ2d(a)giganews.com...
>>>
>>>
>>> "Save $3.99" <dev(a)null.null> wrote in message
>>> news:hjvl8m$689$1(a)freespeech.eternal-september.org...
>>>>
>>>> "Neil Harrington" <never(a)home.com> wrote in message
>>>> news:XZqdndB8evRLGP_WnZ2dnUVZ_tmdnZ2d(a)giganews.com...
>>>>> Now $779.95 at Amazon.
>>>>>
>>>>> Does this suggest the D90 replacement is about to make its debut?
>>>> It's the normal product run price drop. Pretty well all dSLRs have
>>>> price drops 6 months or so after intro.
>>>
>>> Yes, but then they generally stabilize. The D90 was introduced in
>>> August 2008 to replace the D80, which was then two years old. If
>>> Nikon continues model changes about biannually at this camera level
>>> (as it has more or less since the D100) then it seems early for a
>>> replacement, but on the other hand there must be some reason for
>>> the recent downturn in D90 prices. Nikon *increased* the price of
>>> their lenses not long ago, and there hasn't been much if any
>>> increase in the value of the dollar.
>>>
>>> In the past, such price drops this late in a model run have often
>>> preceded introduction of a new model.
>>>
>>
>>
>> How do you spell D7000?
>> ;-))
>
> I will probably be wrong, but what I think is, Nikon would be foolish
> to throw away all the good PR and model name recognition the D90 has
> gained through its lifecycle.
>
> Like the D300/D300s and D3/D3x/D3s, I think any modifications or
> upgrades to the D90 or D700 would, or should be named with the
> addition of a postscript letter, rather than a totally new model
> designation.

I think you're exactly right. Improvements to video and Live View AF (which
seem to be its only shortcomings, from what I read), maybe one or two minor
embellishments, call the result a D90s and it's done.


From: Savageduck on
On 2010-01-30 08:30:51 -0800, Bruce <docnews2011(a)gmail.com> said:

> On Sat, 30 Jan 2010 08:08:35 -0800, Savageduck
> <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:
>
>> On 2010-01-30 02:19:17 -0800, "G Paleologopoulos"
>> <gpaleo(a)ath.forthnet.gr> said:
>>>
>>> How do you spell D7000?
>>> ;-))
>>
>> I will probably be wrong, but what I think is, Nikon would be foolish
>> to throw away all the good PR and model name recognition the D90 has
>> gained through its lifecycle.
>>
>> Like the D300/D300s and D3/D3x/D3s, I think any modifications or
>> upgrades to the D90 or D700 would, or should be named with the addition
>> of a postscript letter, rather than a totally new model designation.
>
>
> I disagree. The D90 is at the top of Nikon's range of consumer DSLRs,
> separate from the prosumer D300 and D700 and the pro D3s/x.
>
> Nikon has clearly decided to number its consumer DSLRs in the Dx000
> series, so the logical successor to the D90 would be numbered in that
> series, with a value of "x" that is greater than 5.

Then why on Earth didn't they number it D9000 to start with?
It seems the D90 was a progression from the D70, and a D90s seems far
more logical, but we are probably all wrong, if it is consumers they
are aiming at it will end up with some truly meaningless letters and
numbers such as "GTHD180" .

>
> D7000 would therefore be quite logical.

Why would there have to be anything logical about model designations
and names of any camera?

Just look at what we have now with all the offerings from all the
manufacturers, all with obligatory "F's", "X's", "D's", "I's", "E's",
"K's", etc and attendant numbers.


--
Regards,

Savageduck

From: Neil Harrington on
Bruce wrote:
> On Sat, 30 Jan 2010 08:08:35 -0800, Savageduck
> <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:
>
>> On 2010-01-30 02:19:17 -0800, "G Paleologopoulos"
>> <gpaleo(a)ath.forthnet.gr> said:
>>>
>>> How do you spell D7000?
>>> ;-))
>>
>> I will probably be wrong, but what I think is, Nikon would be foolish
>> to throw away all the good PR and model name recognition the D90 has
>> gained through its lifecycle.
>>
>> Like the D300/D300s and D3/D3x/D3s, I think any modifications or
>> upgrades to the D90 or D700 would, or should be named with the
>> addition of a postscript letter, rather than a totally new model
>> designation.
>
>
> I disagree. The D90 is at the top of Nikon's range of consumer DSLRs,
> separate from the prosumer D300 and D700 and the pro D3s/x.
>
> Nikon has clearly decided to number its consumer DSLRs in the Dx000
> series, so the logical successor to the D90 would be numbered in that
> series, with a value of "x" that is greater than 5.
>
> D7000 would therefore be quite logical.

It depends on what the successor turns out to be. If it is as rumored a
smaller bodied, AF-motorless camera, then "D7000" may be a suitable
designation -- though that would put it apparently in the same series as the
D3000 and D5000, which as I understand it are all-plastic bodies (i.e., no
metal chassis underneath). That could be a negative from a marketing point
of view.

If on the other hand it appears as a natural extension or evolution in the
D100-D70-D70s-D80-D90 family, then I think the designation should reflect
this, which "D7000" would not do.


From: igotsaurus on
What fools these consumers be:
If you do not offer "new" products then like a shark that stops swimming you
die.
The dSLR life cycle is shorter than ever. How long did it take the D300/90
innards to show up in the D5000?
D80/200 innards are still being repackaged in "new" dSLRs.
Nikon is a bunch of amateurs compared to Canon in the practice of
repackaging old innards in new boxes.



--- news://freenews.netfront.net/ - complaints: news(a)netfront.net ---