From: SMS 斯蒂文• 夏 on
jim_nospam_beasley(a)yahoo.com wrote:
> Is anyone aware of a device that will copy my compact flash directly
> to a hard drive? (like a USB hard drive) I would like to avoid
> carrying a laptop while I travel, but I need to have the capacity of
> compact 120GB hard drive to copy my photos onto as the flash chips are
> filled.
>
> Thanks
>

You might also look at
"http://www.hypershop.com/shop/index.php?cPath=30&osCsid=b91fc83b5b332b3e67400095886b69b2".

You can buy a 120GB HD for about $100 to go inside.
From: Ron Hunter on
David J Taylor wrote:
> Ron Hunter wrote:
>> David J Taylor wrote:
>>> Ron Hunter wrote:
>>> []
>>>> Why spend that much money on SD cards when a full fledged laptop
>>>> with 128GB drive, and a nice big screen can be had for under $500?
>>>> Yes, it is bigger, but it offers many features not available from
>>>> an SD card.
>>> The size, weight and carrying inconvenience of the laptop. Consider
>>> hand luggage only. Given that on my trips I may only take about 3GB
>>> of pictures, SD cards alone would be something I could easily
>>> consider, and at the price SDs are? You could even borrow some SDs
>>> from a friend just for the trip.
>>>
>>> Cheers,
>>> David
>>>
>>>
>> Certainly, if your space needs are that conservative, just buy a few
>> 1GB SD cards. I saw them in the newspaper yesterday for $7.99 each.
>> Not likely to weigh you down. Grin.
>
> A definite improvement in size, capacity and price from the 30MB CF cards
> I bought ten years ago!
>
> David
>
>
Yes, indeed. The price for 1GB of SD ram has fallen from just under $20
to under $8 in less than a year. It looks like flash ram will go to a
few cents/GB in a couple of years. Nice trend. Now if only some other
things, like digital picture frames, would see a similar drop in price.
It is hard to understand how electronic pricing works. Why can a
device like an iPod sell for under $200 with Gigabytes of ram, and a
small display, while a basically similar device to store digital images
costs 5 times as much? Still, HD storage is in the $.30/Gigabyte range,
while flash ram is still over 20 times as much. Seems like the solid
state device would be less expensive to manufacture.
From: Randy Berbaum on

"Ron Hunter" <rphunter(a)charter.net> wrote in message > Yes, indeed. The
price for 1GB of SD ram has fallen from just under $20
> to under $8 in less than a year. It looks like flash ram will go to a few
> cents/GB in a couple of years. Nice trend. Now if only some other
> things, like digital picture frames, would see a similar drop in price. It
> is hard to understand how electronic pricing works. Why can a device like
> an iPod sell for under $200 with Gigabytes of ram, and a small display,
> while a basically similar device to store digital images costs 5 times as
> much? Still, HD storage is in the $.30/Gigabyte range, while flash ram is
> still over 20 times as much. Seems like the solid state device would be
> less expensive to manufacture.

(Caution much of the following is opinion and speculation so take it as a
point of conjecture to begin from. Not a hard and fast for-sure answer.)

I suspect that part of the higher price for anything that includes a display
is the cost of waste. If a solid state memory has one or two bad bits the
software can easily just ignore those sites and use the ones around them.
But if a single display element is bad in an array you will have a possibly
unacceptable blank pixel.

The larger the memory the more bad bits there are likley to be but the
easier it is to work around them. But the larger the display the higher the
odds that one or more bad pixels will be noticable. So if one objectionably
bad display out of 10 made is happening, the cost of making that unsellable
display will then be portioned out to the other 9. And at one time I heard
that the proportion was actually closer to 50% bad. Now this was some time
ago that I heard this and so the rejects are probably fewer now, but it is
impossible to make such rejects totally go away. And if the cost to make a
single large display is the same as making a single wafer of a dozen smaller
displays, and if 1 in 10 of the small displays is rejected, the entire wafer
cost is not wasted. But a single large display on a single wafer will incur
the entire cost of manufacturing and thus rejects will raise the cost of all
the similar displays.

Since memory can adjust for bad spots but displays can't it is probable that
memory costs will continue to fall much faster than large display costs.
Maybe if they figure how to make a single large display from a large number
of small displays, seamlessly, some of the large costs of larger displays
can drop at a similar rate to memory.

JMHO

Randy


From: SMS 斯蒂文• 夏 on
Ron Hunter wrote:

> Yes, indeed. The price for 1GB of SD ram has fallen from just under $20
> to under $8 in less than a year. It looks like flash ram will go to a
> few cents/GB in a couple of years. Nice trend. Now if only some other
> things, like digital picture frames, would see a similar drop in price.
> It is hard to understand how electronic pricing works. Why can a
> device like an iPod sell for under $200 with Gigabytes of ram, and a
> small display, while a basically similar device to store digital images
> costs 5 times as much? Still, HD storage is in the $.30/Gigabyte range,
> while flash ram is still over 20 times as much. Seems like the solid
> state device would be less expensive to manufacture.

Because pricing is based on the market for the device, and what the
competition charges, not directly on the cost of the components or the
labor to manufacture it. Same with cars.
From: John Turco on
jim_nospam_beasley(a)yahoo.com wrote:
>
> Is anyone aware of a device that will copy my compact flash directly
> to a hard drive? (like a USB hard drive) I would like to avoid
> carrying a laptop while I travel, but I need to have the capacity of
> compact 120GB hard drive to copy my photos onto as the flash chips are
> filled.
>
> Thanks


Hello, Jim:

The Archos 504 "portable DVR" might interest you. It has a built-in 2.5"
hard disk, in a choice of 40GB, 80GB or 160GB versions.

With the optional "DVR Station" (USB 2.0 High-Speed device), images can
be downloaded, directly from a digital camera, and video and audio may
be recorded from various external sources and played back, on the 504,
itself.

By the way, I own an Archos 504 complete kit (40GB), but, haven't used
it, yet.

Good luck!


Cordially,
John Turco <jtur(a)concentric.net>