From: BustedFrog on
John McWilliams wrote:
> tony cooper wrote:
>> On Sun, 27 Jul 2008 08:57:22 -0700, John McWilliams
>> <jpmcw(a)comcast.net> wrote:
>>
>>> It'd be interesting if "Rita" gives a straightforward reply to your
>>> query about 75 pounds shipping! I bet he's never shipped anything
>>> anywhere close to that.
>>
>> Rita sells surplus/recycled industrial and computer items. The 70#
>> figure is very understandable for that market.
>>
>> She probably won't provide a reply because she'd rather have you
>> dancing around guessing. But you know that, so you're just dancing
>> for the exercise. Right?
>
> Tony, you are simply amazing: Insightful, perceptive, even poignant!
>
> Since you seem to know so much about our little Rita, how come you can't
> grok that she's a he? Also, did he lead you here, or did you find rpd
> all by yourself?

Grok?

Isn't a Grok a furry little, brightly colored troll that that used to
hang from car rear view mirrors back in the seventies?

Ribbit
>
From: David J. Littleboy on

"BustedFrog" <ribit(a)ribit.org> wrote:
> John McWilliams wrote:
>>
>> Since you seem to know so much about our little Rita, how come you can't
>> grok that she's a he? Also, did he lead you here, or did you find rpd all
>> by yourself?
>
> Grok?
>
> Isn't a Grok a furry little, brightly colored troll that that used to hang
> from car rear view mirrors back in the seventies?

Grok was coined by R. A. Heinlein in Stranger in a Strange Land, and appears
in the Random House Unabridged Dictionary (CD-ROM for DOS version). It's
widely used by geeks. I try to avoid using it; wouldn't want the truth to
get out...

--
David J. Littleboy
Tokyo, Japan


From: William E. Graham on

"ASAAR" <caught(a)22.com> wrote in message
news:1qes84p3rvfmuh61qfj1qtvpdt9p9u8ocb(a)4ax.com...
> On Mon, 28 Jul 2008 13:59:32 -0700, William E. Graham wrote:
>
>> Film scanner + computer = enlarger. - Is there really any market for
>> these
>> things anymore?
>
> Yep, but it's a small market made up of (I suppose) mostly
> photographers that want to continue using their film cameras.
>
> Correction - that applies only to the scanner. Computers aren't
> in the endangered species category. Others that might also want
> film scanners include digital shooters that want to scan and then
> archive their old film negatives and/or slides.
>
Yes....That's what I use my film scanner for. And, I can also make fairly
nice prints from the digitized results. This is a lot easier than trying to
print an image as projected by an enlarger, although the enlarger created
image probably surpasses the digital print in resolution. I don't know how
they make prints of paintings that you can buy from an art store or museum
store.....That is, do the commercial shops still use enlargers, or have they
gone completely digital? I used to know a lady who was a, "color seperation
expert", (or something like that) She could make several printing plates for
the three primary colors that make up a color photo for color printing
purposes.....They paid her very well for her expertise at doing
this.....Apparently, it took some skill to do it correctly. I don't know if
they use that skill anymore.

From: Robert Coe on
On Tue, 29 Jul 2008 08:07:50 +1000, BustedFrog <ribit(a)ribit.org> wrote:
: John McWilliams wrote:
: > tony cooper wrote:
: >> On Sun, 27 Jul 2008 08:57:22 -0700, John McWilliams
: >> <jpmcw(a)comcast.net> wrote:
: >>
: >>> It'd be interesting if "Rita" gives a straightforward reply to your
: >>> query about 75 pounds shipping! I bet he's never shipped anything
: >>> anywhere close to that.
: >>
: >> Rita sells surplus/recycled industrial and computer items. The 70#
: >> figure is very understandable for that market.
: >>
: >> She probably won't provide a reply because she'd rather have you
: >> dancing around guessing. But you know that, so you're just dancing
: >> for the exercise. Right?
: >
: > Tony, you are simply amazing: Insightful, perceptive, even poignant!
: >
: > Since you seem to know so much about our little Rita, how come you can't
: > grok that she's a he? Also, did he lead you here, or did you find rpd
: > all by yourself?
:
: Grok?
:
: Isn't a Grok a furry little, brightly colored troll that that used to
: hang from car rear view mirrors back in the seventies?
:
: Ribbit

He was a character in the comic strip "B.C.".

But as a verb, grok means "recognize and process correctly". As in "Most
browsers can't grok SRV records." It's a term from the Unix world, possibly
originating at MIT. (I say that only because I think that's where I first
heard it.)

Bob
From: ASAAR on
On Mon, 28 Jul 2008 16:12:57 -0700, William E. Graham wrote:

> I don't know how they make prints of paintings that you can buy
> from an art store or museum store.....

Nor do I. The last print I bought was many years ago in the
Metropolitan Museum of Art's gift shop, long before digital. I
don't recall that the reproduction quality of the rather small
picture was particularly high, but I was glad they had it, since the
painting was "stored in the basement" and no longer on display.
There's a jpg of it at the following link, and I think its image
quality is at least as high as the copy I bought, maybe higher.

http://www.maidofheaven.com/joanofarc_Bastien_Lepage.asp


> That is, do the commercial shops still use enlargers, or have they
> gone completely digital? I used to know a lady who was a, "color seperation
> expert", (or something like that) She could make several printing plates for
> the three primary colors that make up a color photo for color printing
> purposes.....They paid her very well for her expertise at doing
> this.....Apparently, it took some skill to do it correctly. I don't know if
> they use that skill anymore.

As long as there's demand for pro photographers shooting MF and
larger, I think that there'll be at least a few labs that use
enlargers. My guess is that most by now scan the film and print
digitally, and that's all that I've seen in local labs for the last
10 years or so. Anyone that still shoots film probably knows a lot
more about this.