From: Doug McDonald on
John McWilliams wrote:

>
> Histograms are of little use with exposures of subjects with extremes in
> contrast or very high or very low lighting conditions, sunsets being
> their own special case.
>

Histograms are of MOST use in such settings.

Doug McDonald
From: Porte Rouge on
So, with WB all set you take a picture. I gather that you expose to
the right? My sunrise is good example of lighting conditions that
lead to especially washed out colors if you do. How do you adjust the
colors in post or do you just meter for the sunrise and let the
histogram fall where it may. When I shot slide film I would spot meter
on an area that I knew what the meter should read and set exposure
accordingly, and in digital this also yields a good looking sunrise.
The histogram, however, is not as far to the right as it could be.

Porte
From: Floyd L. Davidson on
nospam <nospam(a)nospam.invalid> wrote:
>In article <87bpkbguhl.fld(a)apaflo.com>, Floyd L. Davidson
><floyd(a)apaflo.com> wrote:
>
>> BTW, if you shoot a black dog sitting on a snow bank,
>> and meter with a spot meter... what you get is either
>> the coal bin result (from metering on the black dog, and
>> over exposing the snow) or the snow bank effect (from
>> metering on the snow and under exposing the dog).
>
>only if you don't know how to use a spot meter correctly.

Really now. So just what do you meter? You've got a black
dog and a white snow bank...

Maybe the problem is that *you* don't know!

--
Floyd L. Davidson <http://www.apaflo.com/floyd_davidson>
Ukpeagvik (Barrow, Alaska) floyd(a)apaflo.com
From: Floyd L. Davidson on
Doug McDonald <mcdonald(a)scs.uiuc.edu.remove.invalid> wrote:
>John McWilliams wrote:
>
>> Histograms are of little use with exposures of
>> subjects with extremes in contrast or very high or
>> very low lighting conditions, sunsets being their own
>> special case.
>>
>
>Histograms are of MOST use in such settings.

Exactly! (And spot metering is not...)

--
Floyd L. Davidson <http://www.apaflo.com/floyd_davidson>
Ukpeagvik (Barrow, Alaska) floyd(a)apaflo.com
From: Floyd L. Davidson on
Porte Rouge <porterougeman(a)gmail.com> wrote:
>So, with WB all set you take a picture. I gather that you expose to
>the right? My sunrise is good example of lighting conditions that
>lead to especially washed out colors if you do. How do you adjust the
>colors in post or do you just meter for the sunrise and let the
>histogram fall where it may.

If you don't want any part of the scene to clip, then
shoot the sunrize ETTR. It is *absolutely* necessary to
post process, where you set the exposure for whatever
effect you like. ETTR does *not* cause washed out
colors (inappropriate post processing might though).

>When I shot slide film I would spot meter
>on an area that I knew what the meter should read and set exposure
>accordingly, and in digital this also yields a good looking sunrise.
>The histogram, however, is not as far to the right as it could be.

How can you spot meter on an area that "I knew what the
meter would read"??? I don't understand what you mean
by that statement.

If the histogram is not as far to the right as it could
be your image does not have as wide a dynamic range as
the camera is capable of recording. The shadow areas
will have more noise than if it were exposed per ETTR.
If you want any specific *final* tone levels, set it
that way in post processing. In essence, in post
processing drop the "exposure" to make the editor's
histogram show what you think the camera's should have
shown absent ETTR adjustments.

--
Floyd L. Davidson <http://www.apaflo.com/floyd_davidson>
Ukpeagvik (Barrow, Alaska) floyd(a)apaflo.com