From: nospam on
In article <874oq2hmrx.fld(a)apaflo.com>, Floyd L. Davidson
<floyd(a)apaflo.com> wrote:
> >
> >> BTW, if you shoot a black dog sitting on a snow bank,
> >> and meter with a spot meter... what you get is either
> >> the coal bin result (from metering on the black dog, and
> >> over exposing the snow) or the snow bank effect (from
> >> metering on the snow and under exposing the dog).
> >
> >only if you don't know how to use a spot meter correctly.
>
> Really now. So just what do you meter? You've got a black
> dog and a white snow bank...

spot off the dog and place it as a shadow. spot off the snow and place
it as a highlight. spot off both and see how far apart they are and if
you can capture the full range in one photo. if not, decide which one
loses, or whether you want to take two (or more) photos for hdr.

once you have a reading of the dog and the snow (as well as anything
else that may be part of the photo) you can decide *exactly* what the
best exposure should be.

> Maybe the problem is that *you* don't know!

nope, that's not the problem.
From: Floyd L. Davidson on
nospam <nospam(a)nospam.invalid> wrote:
>In article <874oq2hmrx.fld(a)apaflo.com>, Floyd L. Davidson
><floyd(a)apaflo.com> wrote:
>> >
>> >> BTW, if you shoot a black dog sitting on a snow bank,
>> >> and meter with a spot meter... what you get is either
>> >> the coal bin result (from metering on the black dog, and
>> >> over exposing the snow) or the snow bank effect (from
>> >> metering on the snow and under exposing the dog).
>> >
>> >only if you don't know how to use a spot meter correctly.
>>
>> Really now. So just what do you meter? You've got a black
>> dog and a white snow bank...
>
>spot off the dog and place it as a shadow.

That is manual intervention. The same thing as ETTR.
Exactly what was claimed is not necessary.

>spot off the snow and place
>it as a highlight.

See above.

>spot off both and see how far apart they are and if
>you can capture the full range in one photo. if not, decide which one
>loses, or whether you want to take two (or more) photos for hdr.

So just how is all this any different than ETTR? It's
the same thing! (Just not as easy to do as it is with a
histogram.)

>once you have a reading of the dog and the snow (as well as anything
>else that may be part of the photo) you can decide *exactly* what the
>best exposure should be.
>
>> Maybe the problem is that *you* don't know!
>
>nope, that's not the problem.

My mistake. You just didn't read what the discussion
was about, and instead went off on a tangent that has
nothing to do with it.

--
Floyd L. Davidson <http://www.apaflo.com/floyd_davidson>
Ukpeagvik (Barrow, Alaska) floyd(a)apaflo.com
From: nospam on
In article <87d44qfwmk.fld(a)apaflo.com>, Floyd L. Davidson
<floyd(a)apaflo.com> wrote:

> So just how is all this any different than ETTR? It's
> the same thing! (Just not as easy to do as it is with a
> histogram.)

i didn't say anything about ettr. all i said was that:

> >> >> what you get is either
> >> >> the coal bin result (from metering on the black dog, and
> >> >> over exposing the snow) or the snow bank effect (from
> >> >> metering on the snow and under exposing the dog).

only happens if you don't know how to use a spot meter.
From: Floyd L. Davidson on
nospam <nospam(a)nospam.invalid> wrote:
>In article <87d44qfwmk.fld(a)apaflo.com>, Floyd L. Davidson
><floyd(a)apaflo.com> wrote:
>
>> So just how is all this any different than ETTR? It's
>> the same thing! (Just not as easy to do as it is with a
>> histogram.)
>
>i didn't say anything about ettr. all i said was that:

You didn't say anything... period. You quoted something out
of context and changed the subject. That's either dumb or
dishonest or both.

>> >> >> what you get is either
>> >> >> the coal bin result (from metering on the black dog, and
>> >> >> over exposing the snow) or the snow bank effect (from
>> >> >> metering on the snow and under exposing the dog).
>
>only happens if you don't know how to use a spot meter.

It happens if one *expects* that using a meter
*automatically* provides correct exposure, which was the
context of my statement that "what you get is either
....". That was the issue, and you have not addressed it
at all.

If a spot meter is used in the circumstance originally
claimed, that *is* what happens... unless of course one
is not really interested in it being automatic, and
instead uses manual intervention. But the easiest way
to accomplish correct exposure with manual intervention
is ETTR, not spot metering.

Please don't quote things out of context and change the
subject to claim someone other than you doesn't know...

--
Floyd L. Davidson <http://www.apaflo.com/floyd_davidson>
Ukpeagvik (Barrow, Alaska) floyd(a)apaflo.com
From: David J Taylor on
"Porte Rouge" <porterougeman(a)gmail.com> wrote in message
news:f6547516-a414-4ffc-bbce-b0322787e808(a)t2g2000yqn.googlegroups.com...
> So, with WB all set you take a picture. I gather that you expose to
> the right? My sunrise is good example of lighting conditions that
> lead to especially washed out colors if you do. How do you adjust the
> colors in post or do you just meter for the sunrise and let the
> histogram fall where it may. When I shot slide film I would spot meter
> on an area that I knew what the meter should read and set exposure
> accordingly, and in digital this also yields a good looking sunrise.
> The histogram, however, is not as far to the right as it could be.
>
> Porte

I take a much simpler approach in such circumstances - I take the photo
and check on the LCD how it looks. I then adjust the exposure bases on
what I see and my own judgement and experience. I /might/ use the
histogram as an aid.

David