From: Floyd L. Davidson on
"David J Taylor" <david-taylor(a)blueyonder.not-this-part.nor-this.co.uk.invalid> wrote:
>"Porte Rouge" <porterougeman(a)gmail.com> wrote in message
>news:f6547516-a414-4ffc-bbce-b0322787e808(a)t2g2000yqn.googlegroups.com...
>> So, with WB all set you take a picture. I gather that you expose to
>> the right? My sunrise is good example of lighting conditions that
>> lead to especially washed out colors if you do. How do you adjust the
>> colors in post or do you just meter for the sunrise and let the
>> histogram fall where it may. When I shot slide film I would spot meter
>> on an area that I knew what the meter should read and set exposure
>> accordingly, and in digital this also yields a good looking sunrise.
>> The histogram, however, is not as far to the right as it could be.
>>
>> Porte
>
>I take a much simpler approach in such circumstances - I take the photo
>and check on the LCD how it looks. I then adjust the exposure bases on
>what I see and my own judgement and experience. I /might/ use the
>histogram as an aid.

Are you seriously telling us that you adjust exposure
based on the your judgement of the image brightness
using an on camera LCD display?

--
Floyd L. Davidson <http://www.apaflo.com/floyd_davidson>
Ukpeagvik (Barrow, Alaska) floyd(a)apaflo.com
From: David J Taylor on
"Floyd L. Davidson" <> wrote in message news:87vdiie3h0.fld(a)apaflo.com...
> "David J Taylor" <> wrote:
[]
>>I take a much simpler approach in such circumstances - I take the photo
>>and check on the LCD how it looks. I then adjust the exposure based on
>>what I see and my own judgement and experience. I /might/ use the
>>histogram as an aid.
>
> Are you seriously telling us that you adjust exposure
> based on the your judgement of the image brightness
> using an on camera LCD display?

In the typical circumstances when I take photos, e.g. travelling with
groups making short stops, quite often I don't have time to set up a
tripod or otherwise delay in taking a shot, so the LCD provides a quick
go/no-go judgment on the exposure. I'm looking for obvious, gross errors.
I try to get the exposure right in the camera, rather than in
post-processing.

"Adjust" here most likely means what part of the scene I will meter from,
not making critical 1/3-stop adjustments based on reading the histogram or
otherwise measuring the image. I can bracket, if needed.

For the scenes mentioned (sunrise) and many others there is perhaps no
single "correct" exposure in any case - it depends on what the
photographer is trying to create.

David

From: Floyd L. Davidson on
"David J Taylor" <david-taylor(a)blueyonder.not-this-part.nor-this.co.uk.invalid> wrote:
>"Floyd L. Davidson" <> wrote in message news:87vdiie3h0.fld(a)apaflo.com...
>> "David J Taylor" <> wrote:
>[]
>>>I take a much simpler approach in such circumstances - I take the photo
>>>and check on the LCD how it looks. I then adjust the exposure based on
>>>what I see and my own judgement and experience. I /might/ use the
>>>histogram as an aid.
>>
>> Are you seriously telling us that you adjust exposure
>> based on the your judgement of the image brightness
>> using an on camera LCD display?
>
>In the typical circumstances when I take photos, e.g. travelling with
>groups making short stops, quite often I don't have time to set up a
>tripod or otherwise delay in taking a shot, so the LCD provides a quick
>go/no-go judgment on the exposure. I'm looking for obvious, gross errors.
>I try to get the exposure right in the camera, rather than in
>post-processing.

Your definition of "get the exposure right" must be
vastly removed from mine.

A quick look at an histogram, or better yet at a
highlight display, actually does offer some useful
information. The image display alone is worthless.

>"Adjust" here most likely means what part of the scene I will meter from,
>not making critical 1/3-stop adjustments based on reading the histogram or
>otherwise measuring the image. I can bracket, if needed.
>
>For the scenes mentioned (sunrise) and many others there is perhaps no
>single "correct" exposure in any case - it depends on what the
>photographer is trying to create.

I do agree totally with that. The idea that there is
one single "correct" exposure for a sunrise is absurd.
And for any one exposure there are also nearly an
infinite number of slightly different, but all really
pretty, ways to post process it too.

--
Floyd L. Davidson <http://www.apaflo.com/floyd_davidson>
Ukpeagvik (Barrow, Alaska) floyd(a)apaflo.com
From: David J Taylor on
"Floyd L. Davidson" <> wrote in message news:87ljjedwhz.fld(a)apaflo.com...
[]
> Your definition of "get the exposure right" must be
> vastly removed from mine.

It may well do!

> A quick look at an histogram, or better yet at a
> highlight display, actually does offer some useful
> information. The image display alone is worthless.

Yes, I do have the flashing highlight display enabled (perhaps I should
have mentioned that), so over exposure is immediately obvious, and a quick
glance is all that is necessary to check.

Cheers,
David

From: Steven Redgate on

> If you don't want any part of the scene to clip, then
> shoot the sunrize ETTR.  It is *absolutely* necessary to
> post process, where you set the exposure for whatever
> effect you like.  ETTR does *not* cause washed out
> colors (inappropriate post processing might though).

By "washed out" I mean the image is brighter than what I saw when I
took the picture and to get the image to represent what I saw I need
to darken the image. By either reducing exposure or some other method
in post.


> >When I shot slide film I would spot meter
> >on an area that I knew what the meter should read and set exposure
> >accordingly, and in digital this also yields a good looking sunrise.
> >The histogram, however, is not as far to the right as it could be.
>
> How can you spot meter on an area that "I knew what the
> meter would read"???  I don't understand what you mean
> by that statement.

I spot meter on something that, from experience, I know what I want
the light meter to indicate for exposure. For example (for film, no
ETTR), a gray cloud I set exposure so the meter reads in the middle of
the exposure display, a white cloud plus 1 or 2 stops, a black cloud
minus 1 or 2 stops.


> If the histogram is not as far to the right as it could
> be your image does not have as wide a dynamic range as
> the camera is capable of recording.  The shadow areas
> will have more noise than if it were exposed per ETTR.
> If you want any specific *final* tone levels, set it
> that way in post processing.  In essence, in post
> processing drop the "exposure" to make the editor's
> histogram show what you think the camera's should have
> shown absent ETTR adjustments.

Do you specifically reduce the exposure in post or some other method?
There are exposure sliders in ACR and Lightroom, as well as CS4.

Porte