From: bugbear on
DanP wrote:
> Try making a HDR from a single exposure. With RAW it is posible.

RAW just expresses what the sensor captured.

Surely that implies the sensor is inherently HDR;
Fuji's SR (and successors) is the only one I know of.

Applying tonemapping to a RAW is NOT HDR.

BugBear
From: NameHere on
On Wed, 03 Feb 2010 10:54:41 +0100, Ofnuts <o.f.n.u.t.s(a)la.poste.net>
wrote:

>On 03/02/2010 01:57, NameHere wrote:
>
>> Only DSLR proponents are followers. They can never think for themselves.
>> Even worse, they doubt their choices so much that they don't feel
>> vindicated unless they can convince everyone else to believe as they
>> believe and make the same camera purchasing mistakes that they make in
>> life. The greater their insistence to have others buy DSLRs the more they
>> show their insecurity in their own decision to do so.
>
>*woop* *woop* Ironymeter overload!!! Replace "DSLR" by "P&S" in the
>sentence above and look in you mirror....
>
>> Just like those who
>> doubt their religions the most, always being the most vocal about wanting
>> others to believe as they do. Because if they can convince someone else,
>> then perhaps they can stop doubting their own beliefs so much. It's that
>> simple.
>
>So that explains why you spend so much time convincing us. Because if
>you check this forum, you alone have spent more megabytes
>boasting/trying to convince people of the superiority of P&S than any of
>the assumed DSLR minions.

I do no such thing. I merely state the facts every time a DSLR-worshipper
is deriding all other cameras. You don't read and comprehend very clearly
do you. But then that's to be expected of anyone who has their mind engaged
in blind-worship. Put some more blinders on. I don't think you've
brainwashed yourself enough.

From: NameHere on
On Wed, 3 Feb 2010 05:00:09 -0800 (PST), DanP <dan.petre(a)hotmail.com>
wrote:

>
>
>Never seen a pro without a DSLR.
>But if you want to taka a stab do this http://www.flickr.com/photos/danpetre/4196700817/
>with a P&S, preferably in one click.

Here's something a little more challenging for your child's-level and
focal-plane-shutter-crippled DSLR. Physicists doing studies of magnetic
reconnection in helium plasma at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory
using a "lowly" Canon Powershot A700 with CHDK's ultra-fast 1/40,000 of a
second shutter speeds. It's rather impressive.

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3191/3014649023_ec609452ba_o.jpg

You can't use flash to stop an illuminated subject's motion. Only a fast
shutter-speed can provide the images they need. A DSLR is useless to
them--just as DSLRs are useless for many professionals who have found that
fact out on their own for all manner of subjects. They don't sit around
listening to DSLR-Trolls in news-groups. They're independent adults, they
think for themselves.

Here's a couple of other fun ones of someone playing around with a BIC
lighter and using ultra-high shutter speeds in P&S cameras. Neither of
which can be done by using flash to stop the motion.

http://images2.wikia.nocookie.net/chdk/images/e/ee/Bic1.jpg

http://images2.wikia.nocookie.net/chdk/images/8/87/Bic2.jpg

The most interesting thing of all, when taking images of very fast moving
subjects you can preview those shutter speeds in real-time in the EVF
before you've even tripped the shutter. When taking images of a
Dremel-drill grinding-wheel rotating at 30,000 rpm, you can see the image
stopped in real-time as if you had used a high-speed flash, right in the
viewfinder without even taking a picture first to see what's happening.
It's quite amazing the first time you experience this. Your camera's
shutter and electronic viewfinder acting as an ultra-high-speed strobe
without any bright flashing strobe lights.

Sorry, but yours and all others' DSLRs lose big-time if you are going to
use shutter-speeds as any kind of selling point. It also proves how very
useless those optical viewfinders can be in many situations.

Thanks for bringing this up. I'm sure that many people were unaware of just
how crippled their DSLRs truly are when compared to many other more
inexpensive and more powerful P&S cameras.




From: Michael Vogel on
Hi there,

BD wrote:
> I'd like to find a P&S that allows the use of remote slave flashes for
> better control of subject lighting.

Here's one: Canon PowerShot A590IS. I use it on full manual, which
disables the pre-flash so I can use a cheap optical slave-trigger. Works
fine.

> And that allows for apertures wider than f/4.

The A590 goes down to f/2.6.

> And supports the use of RAW files for post-adjustment as necessary.

By using CHDK, I'm able to shoot RAW - altough it not that much of use
on a P&S.

> And supports continuous focus for tracking of moving subject in burst
> mode.
>
> Oh... and that *has* a burst mode to speak of.

Well, you got me here. OMG! A P&S without focus tracking and slower than
10fps. How could they possibly dare to sell something like this for as
much as 170 bucks new?!? (<- irony)

> Can you name a P&S that does all these things?

Btw.: Can YOU name a DSLR, that one can easily shove into one's pocket
(jacket, not trousers), weights under 250g (with lens)
and costs under 170$ new? ;-)

cu
Michael
From: Chris Malcolm on
In rec.photo.digital bugbear <bugbear(a)trim_papermule.co.uk_trim> wrote:
> DanP wrote:
>> Try making a HDR from a single exposure. With RAW it is posible.

> RAW just expresses what the sensor captured.

> Surely that implies the sensor is inherently HDR;

All it implies is that the RAW file covers a significantly wider
dynamic range than can be expressed in a jpeg image. Which is in fact
the case for most image sensors these days.

--
Chris Malcolm
First  |  Prev  |  Next  |  Last
Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Prev: D90 body prices falling steeply
Next: Sigma wide zoom = junk