From: GregS on
In article <g5oaa5dod6i4k5nfou0ikibsemv74pdqpd(a)4ax.com>, Kulvinder Singh Matharu <real-address-in-sig(a)lineone.net> wrote:
>Came across this article about AP publishing a photo of a dying US
>marine and the controversy surrounding it. There hasn't been much
>news here in the UK about it but I expect that it's big news in the
>US.
>
><http://www.thefirstpost.co.uk/53173,news,photograph-of-dying-marine-joshua-ber
>nard-was-it-right-for-the-associated-press-to-publish>
>
>I'm all up for showing how things are and the press have done so on
>may occasions, but at the same time the family must be very upset. So
>I'm in two minds about this. Storm in a tea cup? Or genuine concern
>on showing dead or dying NATO/ISAF soldiers?


If I was part of the family I would feel good that it was published
I guess I would have had to see the orginal news story to really judge.

Perhaps also a good reminder of reality to the public.

Here is another AP photo....

http://cyncity.typepad.com/photos/uncategorized/marykneeling1.jpg

From: Chris H on
In message <h85mvg$jjd$2(a)news.acm.uiuc.edu>, "mcdonaldREMOVE TO ACTUALLY
REACH ME"@scs.uiuc.edu writes
>Twibil wrote:
>> On Sep 7, 9:49 pm, "steph...(a)yahoo.com" <steph...(a)yahoo.com> wrote:
>>>> ...And if the picture was of you --> and the last memory your children
>>>> would have of you, would it still be okay to publish it?
>>> Of course I would. Since when is dying for your country something to
>>> hide or be ashamed of?
>> Not that I've died for my country yet, but as an ex infantryman
>>thanx
>> for that anyway.
>> The wrenching photographs that have come out of wars ever since the
>> camera became portable enough to make them possible have let the
>> public see what war is really about, and right up until the end of
>> Viet Nam such photo-journalism was simply considered to be an
>> important -if risky for the photographer- part of history. (See Ken
>> Burns' Civil War documentary for a striking example.)
>> Then after Viet Nam the US military decided that it would be better
>>if
>> the US public was not allowed to see such photos, as it might
>> prejudice them against supporting a future war -as the military felt
>> had happened in Viet Nam.
>> Ever since then, the military -and the rest of the US government as
>> well- have frequently tried to make it difficult to take such photos,
>> or to allow them to be seen by the public if they *are* taken.
>> Call it "editing history in advance", and you won't be too far
>>wrong.
>>
>
>But before Vietnam the press never actually **supported the enemy**
>as they do now.

No the press are impartial (except Fox). That is what you don't like....
reality
--
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
\/\/\/\/\ Chris Hills Staffs England /\/\/\/\/
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From: Chris H on
In message <98f0599a-3e8a-4ed1-92ea-f691dcdacd95(a)y28g2000prd.googlegroup
s.com>, Twibil <nowayjose6(a)gmail.com> writes
>On Sep 7, 9:49�pm, "steph...(a)yahoo.com" <steph...(a)yahoo.com> wrote:
>>
>> > ...And if the picture was of you --> and the last memory your children
>> > would have of you, would it still be okay to publish it?
>>
>> Of course I would. Since when is dying for your country something to
>> hide or be ashamed of?
>
>Not that I've died for my country yet, but as an ex infantryman thanx
>for that anyway.
>
>The wrenching photographs that have come out of wars ever since the
>camera became portable enough to make them possible have let the
>public see what war is really about, and right up until the end of
>Viet Nam such photo-journalism was simply considered to be an
>important -if risky for the photographer- part of history. (See Ken
>Burns' Civil War documentary for a striking example.)
>
>Then after Viet Nam the US military decided that it would be better if
>the US public was not allowed to see such photos, as it might
>prejudice them against supporting a future war -as the military felt
>had happened in Viet Nam.
>
>Ever since then, the military -and the rest of the US government as
>well- have frequently tried to make it difficult to take such photos,
>or to allow them to be seen by the public if they *are* taken.
>
>Call it "editing history in advance", and you won't be too far wrong.

I think you will find it happened from WW2 It hink it was Capa (of
Magnum Fame) who had many of his D-Day photos censored.

Vietnam was different in that it was the first war that was covered by
ENG or Electronic News Gathering and TV meant that "live" movies of the
war could be transmitted into homes within a free hours. Previously it
was days or weeks and it was still photos.

Now we really can get live still and video broadcast globally.

The problem is not that it is the picture of a dead/dying solider...
those are very common. The problem is that it is an American soldier.



--
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
\/\/\/\/\ Chris Hills Staffs England /\/\/\/\/
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/



From: Chris H on
In message <K9CdnZvgouqThTrXnZ2dnUVZ_qednZ2d(a)giganews.com>, Bill Graham
<weg9(a)comcast.net> writes
>> The people of the middle east have been exploited by horrible
>> governments for centuries.
>>
>Horrible religions, too......I doubt if I could guess which has been
>the worst.....

Historically Christianity
--
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
\/\/\/\/\ Chris Hills Staffs England /\/\/\/\/
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/



From: Chris H on
In message <7IadnTUH2sWsnjrXnZ2dnUVZ_h6dnZ2d(a)giganews.com>, Bill Graham
<weg9(a)comcast.net> writes
>
>"Clancy Clarity" <cc(a)cantspam.org> wrote in message news:hv8ba55s081f46
>bskdm6cucb7r8hbblj1g(a)4ax.com...
>> On Mon, 07 Sep 2009 19:10:52 -0500, Doug McDonald
>> <mcdonald(a)NoSpAmscs.uiuc.edu> wrote:
>>
>>>DG wrote:
>>>> Kulvinder Singh Matharu wrote:
>>>>> Came across this article about AP publishing a photo of a dying US
>>>>> marine and the controversy surrounding it. There hasn't been much
>>>>> news here in the UK about it but I expect that it's big news in the
>>>>> US.
>>>>>
>>>>> <http://www.thefirstpost.co.uk/53173,news,photograph-of-dying-
>>>>>marine-joshua-bernard-was-it-right-for-the-associated-press-to-
>>>>>publish>
>>>>>
>>>>> I'm all up for showing how things are and the press have done so on
>>>>> may occasions, but at the same time the family must be very upset. So
>>>>> I'm in two minds about this. Storm in a tea cup? Or genuine concern
>>>>> on showing dead or dying NATO/ISAF soldiers?
>>
>> This is the first I heard about it. During the 60's and 70's is was
>> perfectly common practice to show all the atrocities of war. But the
>> right-wing scum are too afraid of showing anyone the truth these
>>days. It's
>> how they're able to perpetuate their stupidity and insanity, by not making
>> it clear to the world. They're too insecure and afraid to show their true
>> face and all they have "accomplished" to the world.
>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> What's a photographer supposed to do? Quit shooting in a war zone
>>>> because someone might die?
>>>>
>>>> If people are upset about the photo then they should blame the
>>>> politicians for the war, not the photographer for the image.
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>NO! They should blame the scum people who print it against
>>>the family's wishes, and the people who
>>>started the war: al Qaeda and the Taliban. There is nothing
>>>wrong with the photographer taking it ... if the family
>>>had agreed, publishing it would have been OK.
>>>
>>>Doug McDonald
>>
>> So ... let me get this straight .... It's okay to photograph them killing
>> someone and publishing it without asking, but not okay to photograph them
>> being killed and publishing it without asking. Have I got that
>>correct now?
>>
>Yeah, and what's this stuff about "right wing scum"? Aren't there any
>"left wing scum"? I am right wing, and I am happy with the published
>photo. At least he's a soldier......It seems to me that all the
>civilian deaths are carefully recorded by the, "left wing scum".

Well there are so many more pictures of the dead civilians.

--
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
\/\/\/\/\ Chris Hills Staffs England /\/\/\/\/
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/