From: Bruce on
On Wed, 19 May 2010 15:55:55 GMT, "MC" <any(a)any.any> wrote:
>
>May we ask who this lawer is. Maybe, if he is that good someone here
>may want to use his services. Please give us some info so we can look
>him up.


If you needed his services, you would have no problem finding him.

Self-evidently, you don't.

From: John McWilliams on
Neil Harrington wrote:
> "John McWilliams" <jpmcw(a)comcast.net> wrote in message
> news:ht10vh$e75$1(a)news.eternal-september.org...
>> Neil Harrington wrote:
>>
>>> I am a lifelong aviation enthusiast, and therefore am especially
>>> interested in people who are or have been pilots.
>> Hello, Neil! I earned my ticket my Junior year in college, but it's been
>> so long since I was 'current' that I can barely remember whether stick
>> forward pushes the nose up or down. But I am not in a flap over any of
>> that, as I have little desire to fly high these days. I've still to do
>> lighter than air save for hot air balloons, and I might try the tiny
>> propelled ones.
>
> You're way ahead of me, John. I had a few hours of dual time in a Cessna 150
> in the '60s, and that was all the actual flying I ever did. Long before
> that, I was in the CAP in high school and a friend of mine there had his
> private ticket, so I'd occasionally get a ride in a Cessna, Taylorcraft or
> Aeronca. Dang, it sure was simpler in those days (late '40s mostly)! No
> radio in the plane, and some mechanic would have to come out and spin the
> prop -- except one time when the plane we got was a Cessna 140 (new at that
> time) which had an ELECTRIC STARTER! Wow, talk about deluxe!
>
> Years later, after my half dozen or so lessons in the 150, which I enjoyed
> but ultimately couldn't see much point in continuing, I turned to R/C model
> airplanes and they were a lot of fun. (But messy.) That was in the '70s.
>
> Since the early '80s all my flying has been on computers. I haven't been
> doing nearly as much of that as I'd like to, probably because I'm just very
> bad about organizing my time.
>
> Never been up in a balloon of any kind, or a helicopter either. Or a
> sailplane. I'd love to do each of those at least once. Speaking of
> balloons -- when you say "the tiny propelled ones," what do you mean? Is
> there some sort of mini-blimp or -dirigible?

Poor wording on my part; I meant the little aircraft with small motors-
like a hang glider with an engine- I think there may be a name for them,
but I am not recalling it.

At the same time, a mini blimp would be interesting to photograph
from.... but I think even a mini would be bigger than most garages.

--
john mcwilliams
From: J. Clarke on
On 5/19/2010 4:24 PM, nospam wrote:
> In article<1pu7v5hn91etoaomq4jk5pqlpepoj74evv(a)4ax.com>, Bruce
> <docnews2011(a)gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> As for laws differing across the world, of course they do. But one
>> area of law where there is a welcome (though not total) degree of
>> convergence is that which relates to photography. The IP lawyer I
>> consulted has practised in London, Paris, New York and Hong Kong.
>
> he's licensed to practice in all four??
>
> bullshit.

Regardless, London, New York, and Hong Kong all have legal systems based
on English Common Law--while the details are different in broad outline
they are much alike. Dunno about Paris, given that they've let the
Eiffel Tower people prevent anyone from shooting the Eiffel Tower at
night due to the copyright on the lights I would suspect that they were
a bit more restrictive.

I suspect that if he had experience in a Communist country or an Islamic
one that practices Sharia he'd have a different view.

From: J. Clarke on
On 5/19/2010 5:42 PM, John McWilliams wrote:
> Neil Harrington wrote:
>> "John McWilliams" <jpmcw(a)comcast.net> wrote in message
>> news:ht10vh$e75$1(a)news.eternal-september.org...
>>> Neil Harrington wrote:
>>>
>>>> I am a lifelong aviation enthusiast, and therefore am especially
>>>> interested in people who are or have been pilots.
>>> Hello, Neil! I earned my ticket my Junior year in college, but it's
>>> been so long since I was 'current' that I can barely remember whether
>>> stick forward pushes the nose up or down. But I am not in a flap over
>>> any of that, as I have little desire to fly high these days. I've
>>> still to do lighter than air save for hot air balloons, and I might
>>> try the tiny propelled ones.
>>
>> You're way ahead of me, John. I had a few hours of dual time in a
>> Cessna 150 in the '60s, and that was all the actual flying I ever did.
>> Long before that, I was in the CAP in high school and a friend of mine
>> there had his private ticket, so I'd occasionally get a ride in a
>> Cessna, Taylorcraft or Aeronca. Dang, it sure was simpler in those
>> days (late '40s mostly)! No radio in the plane, and some mechanic
>> would have to come out and spin the prop -- except one time when the
>> plane we got was a Cessna 140 (new at that time) which had an ELECTRIC
>> STARTER! Wow, talk about deluxe!
>>
>> Years later, after my half dozen or so lessons in the 150, which I
>> enjoyed but ultimately couldn't see much point in continuing, I turned
>> to R/C model airplanes and they were a lot of fun. (But messy.) That
>> was in the '70s.
>>
>> Since the early '80s all my flying has been on computers. I haven't
>> been doing nearly as much of that as I'd like to, probably because I'm
>> just very bad about organizing my time.
>>
>> Never been up in a balloon of any kind, or a helicopter either. Or a
>> sailplane. I'd love to do each of those at least once. Speaking of
>> balloons -- when you say "the tiny propelled ones," what do you mean?
>> Is there some sort of mini-blimp or -dirigible?
>
> Poor wording on my part; I meant the little aircraft with small motors-
> like a hang glider with an engine- I think there may be a name for them,
> but I am not recalling it.

That would be an "ultralight".
>
> At the same time, a mini blimp would be interesting to photograph
> from.... but I think even a mini would be bigger than most garages.

Depends on whether it's just a camera platform or not. A radio
controlled airship could be fun.
>

From: nospam on
In article <t8i8v51jm8bvpe3m5j778dr10aoa41db45(a)4ax.com>, Bruce
<docnews2011(a)gmail.com> wrote:

> >May we ask who this lawer is. Maybe, if he is that good someone here
> >may want to use his services. Please give us some info so we can look
> >him up.
>
> If you needed his services, you would have no problem finding him.

there are an awful lot of lawyers in the four countries you listed.
what's his name? his law firm? what type of law does he practice?

> Self-evidently, you don't.

because he does not exist.