From: Bruce on
On Wed, 19 May 2010 18:21:23 -0400, "J. Clarke"
<jclarke.usenet(a)cox.net> wrote:
>
>Regardless, London, New York, and Hong Kong all have legal systems based
>on English Common Law--while the details are different in broad outline
>they are much alike.


Exactly so.


>Dunno about Paris, given that they've let the
>Eiffel Tower people prevent anyone from shooting the Eiffel Tower at
>night due to the copyright on the lights I would suspect that they were
>a bit more restrictive.


A very different system, based on Roman Law.

From: Neil Harrington on

"John McWilliams" <jpmcw(a)comcast.net> wrote in message
news:ht1lvt$4t8$1(a)news.eternal-september.org...
> Neil Harrington wrote:
>> "John McWilliams" <jpmcw(a)comcast.net> wrote in message
>> news:ht10vh$e75$1(a)news.eternal-september.org...
>>> Neil Harrington wrote:
>>>
>>>> I am a lifelong aviation enthusiast, and therefore am especially
>>>> interested in people who are or have been pilots.
>>> Hello, Neil! I earned my ticket my Junior year in college, but it's been
>>> so long since I was 'current' that I can barely remember whether stick
>>> forward pushes the nose up or down. But I am not in a flap over any of
>>> that, as I have little desire to fly high these days. I've still to do
>>> lighter than air save for hot air balloons, and I might try the tiny
>>> propelled ones.
>>
>> You're way ahead of me, John. I had a few hours of dual time in a Cessna
>> 150 in the '60s, and that was all the actual flying I ever did. Long
>> before that, I was in the CAP in high school and a friend of mine there
>> had his private ticket, so I'd occasionally get a ride in a Cessna,
>> Taylorcraft or Aeronca. Dang, it sure was simpler in those days (late
>> '40s mostly)! No radio in the plane, and some mechanic would have to come
>> out and spin the prop -- except one time when the plane we got was a
>> Cessna 140 (new at that time) which had an ELECTRIC STARTER! Wow, talk
>> about deluxe!
>>
>> Years later, after my half dozen or so lessons in the 150, which I
>> enjoyed but ultimately couldn't see much point in continuing, I turned to
>> R/C model airplanes and they were a lot of fun. (But messy.) That was in
>> the '70s.
>>
>> Since the early '80s all my flying has been on computers. I haven't been
>> doing nearly as much of that as I'd like to, probably because I'm just
>> very bad about organizing my time.
>>
>> Never been up in a balloon of any kind, or a helicopter either. Or a
>> sailplane. I'd love to do each of those at least once. Speaking of
>> balloons -- when you say "the tiny propelled ones," what do you mean? Is
>> there some sort of mini-blimp or -dirigible?
>
> Poor wording on my part; I meant the little aircraft with small motors-
> like a hang glider with an engine- I think there may be a name for them,
> but I am not recalling it.

Oh yes, ultralights! They intrigue me too, though at my age I'm not sure I'd
want to try one. Breaking one's bones is best done when much younger, I
understand. :-)

>
> At the same time, a mini blimp would be interesting to photograph from....
> but I think even a mini would be bigger than most garages.

Yes indeed. But I don't see why a mini-dirigible wouldn't be a fairly
practical form of transportation, actually. Santos-Dumont built and flew
several of those starting around the end of the 19th century -- before
heavier-than-air craft were successful.


From: C J Campbell on
On 2010-05-19 13:26:24 -0700, Bruce <docnews2011(a)gmail.com> said:

> On Wed, 19 May 2010 15:55:55 GMT, "MC" <any(a)any.any> wrote:
>>
>> May we ask who this lawer is. Maybe, if he is that good someone here
>> may want to use his services. Please give us some info so we can look
>> him up.
>
>
> If you needed his services, you would have no problem finding him.
>
> Self-evidently, you don't.

Ah. Now you are talking like the P&S troll.

--
Waddling Eagle
World Famous Flight Instructor

From: C J Campbell on
On 2010-05-18 20:06:05 -0700, "Neil Harrington" <never(a)home.com> said:

>
> "C J Campbell" <christophercampbellremovethis(a)hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:2010051819271316807-christophercampbellremovethis(a)hotmailcom...
>> On 2010-05-18 17:38:12 -0700, nospam <nospam(a)nospam.invalid> said:
>>
>>> In article <4bf32972$0$30201$8f2e0ebb(a)news.shared-secrets.com>, Peter
>>> <peternew(a)nospamoptonline.net> wrote:
>>>
>>>> In the mid- 70s cockpit doors were usually shut. The one exception I
>>>> remember was flying Concord. I was permitted to stand at the entrance,
>>>> with
>>>> the door open. I could not take any pictures, not because of
>>>> regulations,
>>>> but because I had no film in my camera.
>>>
>>> concorde didn't have a cockpit door. that was one of the reasons for
>>> its retirement post-911, where a reinforced cockpit door was mandated.
>>> retrofitting it would have cost quite a bit.
>>
>> More than the value of a Concorde?
>>
>> <sigh> There was a day when pilots could afford to be friendly to
>> passengers.
>>
>> --
>> Waddling Eagle
>> World Famous Flight Instructor
>
> Just curious, C J: Are you really a flight instructor?

I am really a flight instructor rated in single and multi-engine
airplanes. However, health issues have kept me from flying for the last
couple of years. Cardiac issues arising from hyperthyroidism. But I
keep my certificates current.

I call myself the "World Famous" flight instructor because, well, some
of you are all over the world -- therefore I am world famous! Of
course, I am also a world famous photographer, as are all of you. lol

My actual career before retiring, though, was a certified public
accountant. I ran a business that syndicated real estate investments.

"Waddling Eagle" is my Vigil Honor name from when I worked with the Boy
Scouts, assigned by the Skokomish tribe. I am incapable of pronouncing
it in the original language.

--
Waddling Eagle
World Famous Flight Instructor

From: C J Campbell on
On 2010-05-19 14:42:19 -0700, John McWilliams <jpmcw(a)comcast.net> said:

> Neil Harrington wrote:
>> "John McWilliams" <jpmcw(a)comcast.net> wrote in message
>> news:ht10vh$e75$1(a)news.eternal-september.org...
>>> Neil Harrington wrote:
>>>
>>>> I am a lifelong aviation enthusiast, and therefore am especially
>>>> interested in people who are or have been pilots.
>>> Hello, Neil! I earned my ticket my Junior year in college, but it's
>>> been so long since I was 'current' that I can barely remember whether
>>> stick forward pushes the nose up or down. But I am not in a flap over
>>> any of that, as I have little desire to fly high these days. I've still
>>> to do lighter than air save for hot air balloons, and I might try the
>>> tiny propelled ones.
>>
>> You're way ahead of me, John. I had a few hours of dual time in a
>> Cessna 150 in the '60s, and that was all the actual flying I ever did.
>> Long before that, I was in the CAP in high school and a friend of mine
>> there had his private ticket, so I'd occasionally get a ride in a
>> Cessna, Taylorcraft or Aeronca. Dang, it sure was simpler in those days
>> (late '40s mostly)! No radio in the plane, and some mechanic would have
>> to come out and spin the prop -- except one time when the plane we got
>> was a Cessna 140 (new at that time) which had an ELECTRIC STARTER! Wow,
>> talk about deluxe!
>>
>> Years later, after my half dozen or so lessons in the 150, which I
>> enjoyed but ultimately couldn't see much point in continuing, I turned
>> to R/C model airplanes and they were a lot of fun. (But messy.) That
>> was in the '70s.
>>
>> Since the early '80s all my flying has been on computers. I haven't
>> been doing nearly as much of that as I'd like to, probably because I'm
>> just very bad about organizing my time.
>>
>> Never been up in a balloon of any kind, or a helicopter either. Or a
>> sailplane. I'd love to do each of those at least once. Speaking of
>> balloons -- when you say "the tiny propelled ones," what do you mean?
>> Is there some sort of mini-blimp or -dirigible?
>
> Poor wording on my part; I meant the little aircraft with small motors-
> like a hang glider with an engine- I think there may be a name for
> them, but I am not recalling it.

In the US, there are two classes of such aircraft. The heavier ones are
light sport aircraft. They can carry the pilot and one passenger. These
may be an option for me to get back into flying, as they require no
medical certificate. Ultralights in the US are limited to something
like 5 gallons of fuel, require no pilot certificate, and are severely
restricted in weight. They also are not allowed to carry passengers,
although some two-seat ultralights may be used for instruction. Other
countries, especially the UK Commonwealth, have different designations
and rules for these types of aircraft. I would not presume to know
whether you can fly an ultralight without a license in Australia, for
example.

>
> At the same time, a mini blimp would be interesting to photograph
> from.... but I think even a mini would be bigger than most garages.

You might try radio controlled photography blimps. They are towed to
the area in small trailers. They may be a bit underpowered and
difficult to control on windy days, but otherwise they make good camera
platforms. You can often get them into areas which would be a problem
for small planes. Plus, they hover.

You can also fly a homebuilt blimp. Check with your local chapter of
the Experimental Aircraft Association. Of course, you would have to be
licensed as a blimp pilot to fly it if it did not qualify as an
ultralight.
http://www.swaviator.com/html/issueJF04/blimp.html

--
Waddling Eagle
World Famous Flight Instructor