From: Bruce on
On Wed, 19 May 2010 22:10:39 -0700, C J Campbell
<christophercampbellremovethis(a)hotmail.com> wrote:

>On 2010-05-19 13:26:24 -0700, Bruce <docnews2011(a)gmail.com> said:
>
>> On Wed, 19 May 2010 15:55:55 GMT, "MC" <any(a)any.any> wrote:
>>>
>>> May we ask who this lawer is. Maybe, if he is that good someone here
>>> may want to use his services. Please give us some info so we can look
>>> him up.
>>
>>
>> If you needed his services, you would have no problem finding him.
>>
>> Self-evidently, you don't.
>
>Ah. Now you are talking like the P&S troll.


And you are relying on personal abuse to cover up the fact that your
so-called "advice" was complete and utter bullshit.

From: Peter on
"Neil Harrington" <never(a)home.com> wrote in message
news:UO-dnb0_8peChmnWnZ2dnUVZ_s-dnZ2d(a)giganews.com...
>
> "John McWilliams" <jpmcw(a)comcast.net> wrote in message
> news:ht10vh$e75$1(a)news.eternal-september.org...
>> Neil Harrington wrote:
>>
>>> I am a lifelong aviation enthusiast, and therefore am especially
>>> interested in people who are or have been pilots.
>>
>> Hello, Neil! I earned my ticket my Junior year in college, but it's been
>> so long since I was 'current' that I can barely remember whether stick
>> forward pushes the nose up or down. But I am not in a flap over any of
>> that, as I have little desire to fly high these days. I've still to do
>> lighter than air save for hot air balloons, and I might try the tiny
>> propelled ones.
>
> You're way ahead of me, John. I had a few hours of dual time in a Cessna
> 150 in the '60s, and that was all the actual flying I ever did. Long
> before that, I was in the CAP in high school and a friend of mine there
> had his private ticket, so I'd occasionally get a ride in a Cessna,
> Taylorcraft or Aeronca. Dang, it sure was simpler in those days (late '40s
> mostly)! No radio in the plane, and some mechanic would have to come out
> and spin the prop -- except one time when the plane we got was a Cessna
> 140 (new at that time) which had an ELECTRIC STARTER! Wow, talk about
> deluxe!
>
> Years later, after my half dozen or so lessons in the 150, which I enjoyed
> but ultimately couldn't see much point in continuing, I turned to R/C
> model airplanes and they were a lot of fun. (But messy.) That was in the
> '70s.
>
> Since the early '80s all my flying has been on computers. I haven't been
> doing nearly as much of that as I'd like to, probably because I'm just
> very bad about organizing my time.
>
> Never been up in a balloon of any kind, or a helicopter either. Or a
> sailplane. I'd love to do each of those at least once. Speaking of
> balloons -- when you say "the tiny propelled ones," what do you mean? Is
> there some sort of mini-blimp or -dirigible?
>
>
Closest to you would be the Adirondack Balloon Festival in September. The
air museum will give rides. Well not exactly give. figure about $350 and up,
unless you work as a volunteer.


--
Peter

From: Peter on
"Neil Harrington" <never(a)home.com> wrote in message
news:58udnX-AK8AfiWnWnZ2dnUVZ_r-dnZ2d(a)giganews.com...
>


> But to tell you the truth I dread the idea of going back to L.I. now --
> it's the Long Island Expressway ("the world's longest parking lot" as
> someone called it) and the equally slow other east-west highways that fill
> me with dread. It wasn't bad at all when I was a kid in the 1940s, and
> afterward I used to go back there occasionally to see old friends from
> school now living in Blue Point and Sayville. But it got progressively
> worse over the years and frankly all those miles and miles of creeping or
> stop-and-go traffic were a nightmare for me. Apparently people who live
> there are used to it and just accept it. I'm assuming it can't have
> improved any, but I haven't been back there for at least 30 years.
>
It's not so bad. Las week we went to Oakdale, just for dinner. We often go
to Patchogue to have dinner on the pier, fish and take photos.


--
Peter

From: Peter on
"Neil Harrington" <never(a)home.com> wrote in message
news:58udnX-AK8AfiWnWnZ2dnUVZ_r-dnZ2d(a)giganews.com...
>

>> Have you been to the Air Museum in Farmingdale, LI.
>
> No, never even knew of it. I spent my childhood on Long Island, in (what
> was then) a little town called Oceanside. I remember the name Farmingdale
> but don't recall if I was ever there.
>
> Here in Connecticut there's the New England Air Museum in Windsor Locks,
> just beyond Bradley International Airport. I go there from time to time
> and recommend it if you're ever up this way.
>
>> If you will be at the air show in Jones Beach I will say hello. I have
>> gone every year when the weather is good.
>
> I remember Jones Beach well! We used to go out there often.
>
> But to tell you the truth I dread the idea of going back to L.I. now --
> it's the Long Island Expressway ("the world's longest parking lot" as
> someone called it) and the equally slow other east-west highways that fill
> me with dread. It wasn't bad at all when I was a kid in the 1940s, and
> afterward I used to go back there occasionally to see old friends from
> school now living in Blue Point and Sayville. But it got progressively
> worse over the years and frankly all those miles and miles of creeping or
> stop-and-go traffic were a nightmare for me. Apparently people who live
> there are used to it and just accept it. I'm assuming it can't have
> improved any, but I haven't been back there for at least 30 years.
>

The LIE is a speedway compared to I95 between Stamford and Bridgeport. We
have lots of family in CT and go to visit. On a hot summer day I prefer the
ferry. We are going to Amherst this July and will go via Danbury to avoid
I95.


--
Peter

From: Peter on
"J. Clarke" <jclarke.usenet(a)cox.net> wrote in message
news:ht1oq202fli(a)news3.newsguy.com...
> On 5/19/2010 4:24 PM, nospam wrote:
>> In article<1pu7v5hn91etoaomq4jk5pqlpepoj74evv(a)4ax.com>, Bruce
>> <docnews2011(a)gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>>> As for laws differing across the world, of course they do. But one
>>> area of law where there is a welcome (though not total) degree of
>>> convergence is that which relates to photography. The IP lawyer I
>>> consulted has practised in London, Paris, New York and Hong Kong.
>>
>> he's licensed to practice in all four??
>>
>> bullshit.
>
> Regardless, London, New York, and Hong Kong all have legal systems based
> on English Common Law--while the details are different in broad outline
> they are much alike.



The devil is in the details. When working out of my jurisdiction, I always
used the services of local council just to help keep my client out of
trouble. If the client wouldn't agree, I would not get involved in the case.

--
Peter