From: C J Campbell on
On 2010-05-17 20:45:01 -0700, krishnananda
<krishna(a)divine-life.in.invalid> said:

> In article
> <bbd942c4-4368-41f4-9579-0ff029328b19(a)o15g2000vbb.googlegroups.com>,
> Shawn <shawn0706(a)gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> All:
>>
>> I would like to take picture in airplane cabins.
>>
>> http://www.google.com/images?hl=en&gbv=2&tbs=isch%3A1&sa=1&q=cathay+pacific+bu
>> siness+class&aq=f&aqi=g1&aql=&oq=&gs_rfai=
>>
>> Some flights are red-eye, and I would like to use a fast lens to take
>> first/business class pictures.
>>
>> Which of the following lenses sould I use?
>>
>> http://www.borrowlenses.com/category/nikon
>>
>> Thanks.
>
>
> The following is quoted from the below-referenced website. Edited for
> brevity. This may only apply to US carriers or US airspace. I do not
> know.
> ----------
>
> http://photography.lovetoknow.com/Can_I_Take_Pictures_on_a_Commercial_Air
> plane
>
> Can I take pictures on a commercial airplane? It�s a question commonly
> asked by camera-toting travelers, who are unsure of federal aviation
> regulations.
>
> The short answer is yes. Whereas the events of September 11, 2001
> temporarily banned airline passengers from taking pictures in commercial
> aircrafts, as of April 2010, there are no Federal Aviation
> Administration (FAA) regulations that restrict still photographs on
> airlines.
>
> [The long answer:]
>
> While there are no existing FAA rules prohibiting still photography on
> airplanes, if your flash disturbs other passengers, flight attendants
> may ask you refrain from using your camera to snap photos. In such
> cases, federal regulations require that you follow the instructions of
> flight attendants during your flight.
>
> If you plan to [videotape] on a commercial airliner, you should know
> that there isn't an all-encompassing ban on video camera use throughout
> the industry. The FAA doesn't have specific regulations stating that
> taking video images inside a plane or out an aircraft's window is
> illegal. However, individual airlines have the right to set and enforce
> their own rules regarding the use of video cameras on their planes,
> whether they are on the ground or in the air. Moreover, individual
> flight attendants have the right to restrict the use of any digital
> media. Passengers are required to do what the flight crew says under FAA
> regulations. If you do not comply with the wishes of the individual
> carrier, you are subject to penalties ranging from paying fees to being
> escorted off the flight.
>
> Spare yourself from a potentially embarrassing situation by checking
> with your carrier about photography rules before taking off. Since
> airlines have the ability to restrict the use of video cameras and
> camera phones during flights, don�t assume that because you were able to
> shoot photos on one airplane, you can do so on another carrier.

Doubt if it is such a big deal nowadays since everyone flies with the
cockpit doors closed, but back in the day...

Flying long haul at night over the Pacific, pilots straining their eyes
for some other traffic, maybe some St. Elmo's Fire crawling up the
windscreen, and.........FLASH! Nothing quite sets your teeth on edge as
something like that.

But I don't think the OP is from the USA. I think he wants to take
pictures on Cathay Pacific flights. I think if I wanted to take
pictures on a Cathay Pacific flight, I would just take pictures until a
crew member asked me to stop.

--
Waddling Eagle
World Famous Flight Instructor

From: Bruce on
On Mon, 17 May 2010 16:37:14 -0700, C J Campbell
<christophercampbellremovethis(a)hotmail.com> wrote:

>On 2010-05-16 13:30:09 -0700, Bruce <docnews2011(a)gmail.com> said:
>
>> On Sun, 16 May 2010 10:02:07 -0700 (PDT), Shawn <shawn0706(a)gmail.com>
>> wrote:
>>> I would like to take picture in airplane cabins.
>>> http://www.google.com/images?hl=en&gbv=2&tbs=isch%3A1&sa=1&q=cathay+pacific+business+class&aq=f&aqi=g1&aql=&oq=&gs_rfai=
>
>Some
>>>
>>> flights are red-eye, and I would like to use a fast lens to take
>>> first/business class pictures.
>>>
>>> Which of the following lenses sould I use?
>>> http://www.borrowlenses.com/category/nikon
>>
>>
>> Is this an assignment where you have been commissioned by the airline?
>> If not you will need to obtain the airline's prior express permission.
>> You will also need a release or releases from the airline if you wish
>> to sell or publish any of the shots - that includes placing them on a
>> personal web site.
>
>I think most lawyers would disagree with that. It depends on use, such
>as whether the pictures are taken for editorial or for commercial (i.e.
>advertising) purposes.


And you really think someone posting such elementary questions on a
Usenet newsgroup is likely to be shooting "for editorial purposes"?

How charmingly naive. ;-)

From: Bruce on
On Mon, 17 May 2010 16:45:41 -0700, C J Campbell
<christophercampbellremovethis(a)hotmail.com> wrote:

>You have confused "private property" with "private place." An airplane,
>cruise ship, restaurant, sports stadium, or garden might well be
>private property. But they are public places -- open to the general
>public. As such, the burden of proof is on you to show that you have a
>reasonable expectation of privacy in such places.


Everyone should beware amateur "legal experts" who post on Usenet
newsgroups.

From: Bruce on
On Mon, 17 May 2010 23:06:54 -0700, C J Campbell
<christophercampbellremovethis(a)hotmail.com> wrote:
>
>But I don't think the OP is from the USA. I think he wants to take
>pictures on Cathay Pacific flights. I think if I wanted to take
>pictures on a Cathay Pacific flight, I would just take pictures until a
>crew member asked me to stop.


Only a complete fool would do that.

It appears you are that complete fool. ;-)

From: nospam on
In article <54h4v5hur4cgvsikjsr938qv065900jkqj(a)4ax.com>, Bruce
<docnews2011(a)gmail.com> wrote:

> >You have confused "private property" with "private place." An airplane,
> >cruise ship, restaurant, sports stadium, or garden might well be
> >private property. But they are public places -- open to the general
> >public. As such, the burden of proof is on you to show that you have a
> >reasonable expectation of privacy in such places.
>
> Everyone should beware amateur "legal experts" who post on Usenet
> newsgroups.

true, but what he wrote is correct.