From: Andrew Price on
On Tue, 21 Aug 2007 05:33:26 -0700, Claudio Bonavolta
<claudio(a)bonavolta.ch> wrote:

[---]

>In your situation, I would try to find a local supplier of raw
>chemicals and mix my own, it may be easier.

Good suggestion. See also Lloyd Erlick's article :

<http://www.heylloyd.com/technicl/bulkchem.htm>

on this subject. The other articles on his site are also well worth
reading.
From: Geoffrey S. Mendelson on
Rod Smith wrote:

Thanks,

> When did you check their prices? I recall that Freestyle added some
> overseas shipping options a few months ago, with the goal of making
> themselves more affordable for non-US customers. If you did your checks a
> while back, it could be you should check again.

It was a year ago, I should check again.

> You might see if you can find a red LED bulb. I use one of these as one of
> my two safelights:
>
> http://www.superbrightleds.com/specs/E27-W24.htm

I wonder if I can just make one from red LED's? I have many of them. It won't
look as nice, and I'll probably just run it off of a "wall wart".


> My second safelight is a coated low-wattage incandescent bulb, similar to
> what you describe. I bought it from B&H or Freestyle (I don't recall
> which). Coated red bulbs sold for non-photographic uses might or might not
> be safe; the coating might be incomplete or it might pass light outside of
> the safe range. If you've got no other choice you might as well try one,
> but I certainly wouldn't assume it's safe without testing.

I expect not. When I was in high school a camera store opened nearby
(but not near enough for me to use) with a rental darkroom. It had
flourescent lights with the tubes in red sleeves. I wonder if I
could get one of those, but the room may be too small.

I've gotten far enough to test things and found that my "darkroom" was
too bightly lit at night to be of any use. I covered the windows with
aluminum foil (just the thing for low price, easy availabilty, and sloppy
workers) and tried it out tonight. It's dark enough to work at night.
It's actually two rooms, a larger area with a clothes dryer in it, which
I am using as an enlarging table, and a small powder room with a counter,
sink and toilet as the wet room.

I'm safe until the rainy season which starts around November first,
then my wife will actually use the dryer for its intended purpose.

I tried the Kodak safelight with a 10 watt bulb in it and it lit up
the powder room well enough to work. I could not find any 15 watt bulbs,
and on the third try, the local hardware store produced some 5-10 watt
(I wish they'd make up their mind) bulbs. I'll have to measure their
current draw.

I'll probably use it for the wet room, and the red lights for the enlarging
area. Now I have to figure out how to set up a switching arangment so
that they go off when the enlarger goes on. I don't have a timer, but
I can count to 10 and if I concentrate 15 :-)


> Oh, I've heard of people using red Christmas tree lights as safelights.
> I'd imagine those are rarer in Israel than in the US, though. ;-)


They show up in the fall for Sukkot (the feast of Tabernacles), where
everyone builds little huts and eats in them for a week commemerating
the annual census and harvest where everyone traveled to Jerusalem
and lived in huts for a week. We decorate them and eat in them,
some people sleep in them.

By Christmas time, they disapear from the stores. :-)

> FWIW, I've heard that Rodinal makes a decent paper developer, but I've
> never tried it myself. (It must be used at greater concentration than with
> film -- around 1+10 dilution, IIRC.) There's also a mix-it-yourself
> version of Rodinal called paRodinal; see
> http://silent1.home.netcom.com/Photography/Dilutions%20and%20Times.html
> (it's one of several formulas there). The advantage of paRodinal is that
> it's easy to make from acetaminophen (Tylenol) tablets, sodium sulfite,
> and sodium hydroxide (lye). When mixed, the acetaminophen is chemically
> converted into p-aminophenol, the developing agent in Rodinal. Given what
> you've said, you might find it easier to track down these ingredients than
> to track down a packaged commercial developer.


I tried that. I found that the local tylenol equivalent was expensive,
pure sodium hydroxide was available only from a soap maker (who was
willing to sell me 250 grams at a time), but sulfite was impossible
to find. None of the camera stores carried it, and I could not locate
a pool supply. Private pools are rare here.


> For that matter, you could try to get more traditional photographic raw
> ingredients, such as phenidone, metol, etc. You could then mix a wide
> variety of developers. I believe that JD Photochem
> (http://www.jdphotochem.com) in Canada ships internationally. Even if
> shipping charges are ridiculous, chances are you'll be able to find some
> ingredients locally, so the total cost on a per-liter basis of developer
> should be reasonable. If you don't know Thing One about mixing your own
> chemicals, check out a few resources:

I guess I could try that, I used to do it a long time ago. Thanks.
Eventually it may not be optional, as every day goes by the supply
of ready made stuff shrinks.

Thanks for all the advice. I appriciate it.

Geoff.


--
Geoffrey S. Mendelson, Jerusalem, Israel gsm(a)mendelson.com N3OWJ/4X1GM
IL Voice: (07)-7424-1667 U.S. Voice: 1-215-821-1838
Visit my 'blog at http://geoffstechno.livejournal.com/
From: Geoffrey S. Mendelson on
Rod Smith wrote:
> When did you check their prices? I recall that Freestyle added some
> overseas shipping options a few months ago, with the goal of making
> themselves more affordable for non-US customers. If you did your checks a
> while back, it could be you should check again.

The option they added was USPS international priority mail. It was
reasonably priced up until May, when the rates were restructured.

Now it's $20 for the first pound and $4 for each pound after that
including packaging. There is a special box rate (you use their box),
which may or may not fit and Freestyle is under no obligation to
use it. It's about $35 for up to 20 pounds.

I assume if I were to get some small things, then it would cost about
$45 ($35 for the shipping and $10 for the packaging). Paper may not fit
in the box, or be too heavy and I would have to go with the by the
pound option.

Most if not all, packages are X-rayed at least once.

I guess it's worth a shot, I'll wait until next month when it's cooler.
No need to have things cooked in transit. :-)

Thanks, Geoff.

--
Geoffrey S. Mendelson, Jerusalem, Israel gsm(a)mendelson.com N3OWJ/4X1GM
IL Voice: (07)-7424-1667 U.S. Voice: 1-215-821-1838
Visit my 'blog at http://geoffstechno.livejournal.com/
From: Richard Knoppow on

"Geoffrey S. Mendelson" <gsm(a)mendelson.com> wrote in message
news:slrnfcl22n.r42.gsm(a)cable.mendelson.com...
> Richard Knoppow wrote:
>
> Thanks for the wonderful answer. It will be a great help.
>
>> Outdated paper is likely to be fogged. While the
>> use
>> of an anti-fog agent can same some of it its best just to
>> avoid it.
>
> I agree, but it's what I have. :-)
>
> I'll have to see if I can get any paper locally. Darkroom
> stuff does
> not sell well here.
>

Most of long post snipped...

I am sorry to hear of the problems caused by unreasonable
taxes there. A real PITA.
If you can obtain raw chemicals you can make your own
wash aid. For paper a simple 2% solution of Sodium Sulfite
will work well. I think sulfite is available for other uses
than photography so it may be easier to obtain than it first
looks. The use of a Sulfite wash aid very substantially
reduces the amount of water needed for washing, by at least
6 times. Also, you can save more but using a sequential bath
method. Total washing time is about the same but the amount
of water used is much less than for a running water wash.
Kodak and Ilford give instructions for film but paper can be
washed the same way. Agitate fiber prints in a sequence of
about 5 minute baths of water for about 6 changes of water
when a wash aid is used.
Beware of red coated light bulbs as safelights. They
_look_ red but pass enough other colors to cause fogging.
They may be OK but test them. Actually, any safelight should
be checked because the filters fade with time.
Old paper can often be used with the help of an
anti-fogging agent. The most effective is Benzotriazole but
plain Potassium bromide will work. Bromide has a greater
effect on the image color (tends to warm it up) and looses
more speed than Benzotriazole. I will have to look up the
amounts, they are given in Grant Haist's book and its in a
box somewhere right now.
In general, cold tone papers tend to pick up fog less
than warm tone paper. I have some ancient Brovira which
still works but warmer tone paper such as Agfa Portriga
Rapid is useless even with the anti-foggant.
Rodinal is not the ideal developer for anything but works
OK where somewhat increased grain is acceptable. That means
it work for large format negatives and for very fine grain
film. In particular, it will develop T-Max or Delta films
wtih relatively fine grain. Rodinal also makes a good, if a
bit expensive paper developer at about 1:30.


--
---
Richard Knoppow
Los Angeles, CA, USA
dickburk(a)ix.netcom.com



From: Ken Hart on

"Geoffrey S. Mendelson" <gsm(a)mendelson.com> wrote in message
news:slrnfcmhv5.74h.gsm(a)cable.mendelson.com...
>
> I'm safe until the rainy season which starts around November first,
> then my wife will actually use the dryer for its intended purpose.

Watch out for dryer lint!
>
> I tried the Kodak safelight with a 10 watt bulb in it and it lit up
> the powder room well enough to work. I could not find any 15 watt bulbs,
> and on the third try, the local hardware store produced some 5-10 watt
> (I wish they'd make up their mind) bulbs. I'll have to measure their
> current draw.
>
> I'll probably use it for the wet room, and the red lights for the
> enlarging
> area. Now I have to figure out how to set up a switching arangment so
> that they go off when the enlarger goes on. I don't have a timer, but
> I can count to 10 and if I concentrate 15 :-)
>
Disclaimer: (a) I'm not a licensed electrician, nor do I play one on TV; (b)
I have no idea what kind of electrical systems/parts are available in
Israel.

The wall switches that are used for three-way light circuits (such as the
light in a stairway where there is a switch downstairs and another upstairs
to control one light) are single-pole-double-throw switches. They have three
connections: have the power coming in on the 'common', and out on one of the
two others depending on the position of the switch. One position of the
switch supplies power to the safelight, the other position supplies power to
the enlarger.
>


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