From: Rod Smith on
In article <slrnfcqdel.65c.gsm(a)cable.mendelson.com>,
gsm(a)mendelson.com (Geoffrey S. Mendelson) writes:
>
> dan.c.quinn(a)att.net wrote:
>
>> Agfa for many years recommended a 2% solution
>> of sodium carbonate. Dan
>
> Ok, I'll look for those things, but it's not a priority. In 2003 I bought
> large bottles of Tental developer, wash aid and fixer. The developer
> did not last, but the fixer and wash aid concentrates seem to be
> fine.

Wash aids tend to deteriorate over time, so unless you've got a way for
testing activity, I'd be a bit cautious with the wash aid. Fixer develops
a spoiled-egg smell when it goes bad, although I suppose that might be
masked by an ammonia odor with some fixers.

As to sodium carbonate, that's a VERY common ingredient in household
detergents. In the US, Arm and Hammer Washing Soda is pure sodium
carbonate monohydrate; I use that in my formulas that call for it. You
might be able to find sodium carbonate sold as a laundry booster in
Israel, but I don't know your local brands, so you'll have to check box
ingredients yourself.

--
Rod Smith, rodsmith(a)rodsbooks.com
http://www.rodsbooks.com
Author of books on Linux, FreeBSD, and networking
From: dan.c.quinn on
On Aug 20, 1:14 am, Geoffrey S. Mendelson wrote:
>
> Any recemondations for a commonly available liquid paper developer?
> I plan to make up a tray full of developer and stop bath and throw them
> out when done. Fixer will probably be old, but still useable, film fixer.
> (should I dilute the fixer?) Thanks, Geoff.
>

All that's needed for film and paper developers is ascorbic acid,
phenidone, and sodium carbonate and/or borax. For fixer all that is
needed is sodium thiosulffate. Water is often used as a stop. All but
the phenidone should be close at hand. Ten grams of phenidone will
make 250 liters of developer. Likely that would be mail-order.
If Graded paper is available a higher level of lighting can be had
in
the darkroom. I've a few orange-ish yellow safelights. Very easy to
see and do in my darkroom. Dan

From: Geoffrey S. Mendelson on
dan.c.quinn(a)att.net wrote:
> the darkroom. I've a few orange-ish yellow safelights. Very easy to
> see and do in my darkroom. Dan


Speeaking of that has anyone tried to put a compact flourescent bulb in
a safelight? I assume if it would work, the safelight would have
much farther from the paper than with an icandescent one of the same
wattage.

Thanks.

Geoff.



--
Geoffrey S. Mendelson, Jerusalem, Israel gsm(a)mendelson.com N3OWJ/4X1GM
IL Voice: (07)-7424-1667 U.S. Voice: 1-215-821-1838
Visit my 'blog at http://geoffstechno.livejournal.com/
From: Geoffrey S. Mendelson on
dan.c.quinn(a)att.net wrote:

> All that's needed for film and paper developers is ascorbic acid,
> phenidone, and sodium carbonate and/or borax. For fixer all that is
> needed is sodium thiosulffate. Water is often used as a stop. All but
> the phenidone should be close at hand. Ten grams of phenidone will
> make 250 liters of developer. Likely that would be mail-order.

I'll have to look around for them. I have not seen them sold here,
and have seen several questions, but never any answers about buying them.

Thanks,

Geoff.

--
Geoffrey S. Mendelson, Jerusalem, Israel gsm(a)mendelson.com N3OWJ/4X1GM
IL Voice: (07)-7424-1667 U.S. Voice: 1-215-821-1838
Visit my 'blog at http://geoffstechno.livejournal.com/
From: Richard Knoppow on

<dan.c.quinn(a)att.net> wrote in message
news:1187910756.236097.308720(a)r23g2000prd.googlegroups.com...
> On Aug 20, 1:14 am, Geoffrey S. Mendelson wrote:
>>
>> Any recemondations for a commonly available liquid paper
>> developer?
>> I plan to make up a tray full of developer and stop bath
>> and throw them
>> out when done. Fixer will probably be old, but still
>> useable, film fixer.
>> (should I dilute the fixer?) Thanks, Geoff.
>>
>
> All that's needed for film and paper developers is
> ascorbic acid,
> phenidone, and sodium carbonate and/or borax. For fixer
> all that is
> needed is sodium thiosulffate. Water is often used as a
> stop. All but
> the phenidone should be close at hand. Ten grams of
> phenidone will
> make 250 liters of developer. Likely that would be
> mail-order.
> If Graded paper is available a higher level of lighting
> can be had
> in
> the darkroom. I've a few orange-ish yellow safelights.
> Very easy to
> see and do in my darkroom. Dan
>

Both developers and fixers need an anti-oxidixing agent.
In traditional powder formulas this is usually Sodium
Sulfite but there are other agents that perform the same
duty in liquid concentrates. While there is an ocassional
flurry of enthusiasm for making developers without Sulfite
they really have no advantage. Sulfite in fixing baths is
necessary even when the bath is neutral to protect the
Thiosulfate from oxidation from the air and to prevent
staining from carried over developer. It is used in acid
fixing baths in excess to prevent decomposition of the fixer
by the acid.
Sulfite performs several functions in developers. Beside
protecting the developing agents from oxidation from the air
the sulfite also acts to regenerate developer reaction
products, to prevent staining from these products, and as a
halide solvent. The action of a halide solvent is quite
mis-understood, it does not "etch" the silver crystals,
rather it changes the way the halide crystals develop into
metallic and, in moderate amounts, removes a small amount of
the crystal surface exposing more development centers and
increasing effective film speed a little. In greater
quantity, as in some fine grain developers, it can reduce
film speed by destroying some of the development centers.
The amount of Sulfite will not by itself tell you much about
the solvent activity becuse that is a complex function of
the Sulfite and the activity of the developing agents. For
instance, D-23 and D-25, an exta-fine-grain developer, have
exactly the same amount of Sulfite, but D-23 is buffered to
neutral and is much less active than D-23. So, D-23 grain
and film speed is about the same as D-76 but D-25 looses
about one stop of speed while delivering about 1/2 the
speed.
Not much sulfite is needed in a neutral fixer, about 5
grams per liter will do. More provides some reserve to take
care of carried over developer. However, there are
advantages to regular acid fixers even when they are not
hardening fixers. Acid fixing baths usually have about 15
grams per liter of Sulfite.
Its certainly true that not much is needed to make up
developers and fixing baths. Film can be developed with
D-23, which contains only Metol and Sulfite. A more active
developer is needed for paper but can be made up of the
above with the addition of Sodium or Potassium Carbonate,
hydroquinone (or ascorbic acid), and some Potassium bromide.
Formulas for developers and fixing baths abound on the web.


--
---
Richard Knoppow
Los Angeles, CA, USA
dickburk(a)ix.netcom.com


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