From: Chris Malcolm on
In rec.photo.digital Gary Eickmeier <geickmei(a)tampabay.rr.com> wrote:

> "Peter Huebner" <no.one(a)this.address> wrote in message
> news:MPG.25bdec1a7febdf709898f8(a)news.individual.net...
>> In article <eVA4n.27388$Ym4.3975(a)text.news.virginmedia.com>, david-
>> taylor(a)blueyonder.delete-this-bit.and-this-part.co.uk.invalid says...
>>>
>>> When I last looked, Olympus lenses were rather expensive, and yet lacked
>>> image stabilisation, even in the telephotos.
>>>
>>> David
>>>
>>
>> I don't know a lot about different Oly dslr models, but the E-620 has
>> sensor shift IS. I understand sensor-shift is not as effective as lens
>> based, but on the other hand it makes for lighter lenses and allows you
>> to achieve IS with adapter mounted lenses ... (point of special interest
>> to me).

> The Sony A550 has it all. It is a DSLR with fast focusing live view,
> rotating LCD, sensor stabilization, HDR, and 14MP.

It doesn't have it all. It doesn't have MLU! :-)

But it does have two excellent new features you didn't mention. The
first is a big bright LCD with adaptive brightness which can easily be
seen in weak sunlight. (The strong sunlight test is still a few months
away in these northern latitudes :-)

The second is that in addition to the secondary sensor live view which
gives you fast AF with live view, you can also switch with one button
press to image sensor live view with magnification up to pixel level
all over the image. Makes critical manual focusing to the millimetre
so easy it's a delight to use!

--
Chris Malcolm
From: Gary Eickmeier on

"David J Taylor"
<david-taylor(a)blueyonder.delete-this-bit.and-this-part.co.uk.invalid> wrote
in message news:gjH4n.27594$Ym4.26366(a)text.news.virginmedia.com...
> "Gary Eickmeier" <geickmei(a)tampabay.rr.com> wrote in message
> news:4b533782$0$20414$9a6e19ea(a)news.newshosting.com...
> []
>> The Sony A550 has it all. It is a DSLR with fast focusing live view,
>> rotating LCD, sensor stabilization, HDR, and 14MP.
>>
>> Gary Eickmeier
>
> You haven't used a long telephoto lens hand-held with in-lens IS, have
> you?

Why would I do that without a tripod?

No, I don't do a lot of tele work.

Gary Eickmeier


From: Chris Malcolm on
In rec.photo.digital David J Taylor <david-taylor(a)blueyonder.delete-this-bit.and-this-part.co.uk.invalid> wrote:
> "Gary Eickmeier" <geickmei(a)tampabay.rr.com> wrote in message
> news:4b533782$0$20414$9a6e19ea(a)news.newshosting.com...
> []
>> The Sony A550 has it all. It is a DSLR with fast focusing live view,
>> rotating LCD, sensor stabilization, HDR, and 14MP.
>>
>> Gary Eickmeier

> You haven't used a long telephoto lens hand-held with in-lens IS, have
> you?

I certainly haven't, but given all the rumours about how badly
in-camera IS performs with long lenses I was pleasantly surprised to
discover how well it worked with my 500mm.

--
Chris Malcolm
From: David J Taylor on
"Chris Malcolm" <cam(a)holyrood.ed.ac.uk> wrote in message
news:7rh1geFul7U1(a)mid.individual.net...
[]
> Also IS isn't a fixed technology. It keeps improving. So if you want
> the extra stop or so of extra IS that's just been developed you either
> have to buy a new set of lenses, or just a new body, which you were
> probably going to buy anyway. If your lenses are full of
> electromechanical technology they're goiong to age a lot faster.
>
> --
> Chris Malcolm

Yes, that's one point in favour of in-body IS, but having the viewfinder
image stabilised is a much more practical benefit in my view. I rather
suspect that the 3-4 stops we have now is perhaps enough, at least if you
are photographing moving subjects.

Cheers,
David

From: David J Taylor on

"Gary Eickmeier" <geickmei(a)tampabay.rr.com> wrote in message
news:4b5353b3$0$1633$9a6e19ea(a)news.newshosting.com...
>
> "David J Taylor"
[]
>> You haven't used a long telephoto lens hand-held with in-lens IS, have
>> you?
>
> Why would I do that without a tripod?
>
> No, I don't do a lot of tele work.
>
> Gary Eickmeier

I like tele, and I like carrying the minimum, which means no tripod and no
external flash. Most of my stuff is "subjects of opportunity" where
having a camera fixed on a tripod would likely result in me pointing in
the wrong direction, and tripods can be of limited applicability on moving
platforms or inside buildings. So in-lens IS suits my style of working.

Cheers,
David

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