From: David J Taylor on

"Chris Malcolm" <cam(a)holyrood.ed.ac.uk> wrote in message
news:7ri0nlF63aU1(a)mid.individual.net...
[]
> Might it be that Olympus's committment to a smaller sensor, which
> they're hoping to push in pixel count as technology develops, means
> that they're designing their lenses for smaller pixels, i.e. higher
> resolution? That would be the sensible thing to do, IMHO -- it's the
> way out of the small sensor trap that so many accuse them of having
> got stupidly stuck in.
>
> --
> Chris Malcolm

Yes, that argument makes sense, but with some folk complaining that even
the APS-C entry level DSLRs are too small for them (the camera, not the
sensor), one has to question the need for 4/3.

Having said that, I applaud the general idea of the smaller camera, and
perhaps a mirror-less camera, if the problems of providing very fast
auto-focus and high-resolution, to-the-eye viewfinder images can be
solved. Even better if it takes Nikon DX lenses!

Cheers,
David

From: Chris Malcolm on
In rec.photo.digital Alfred Molon <alfred_molon(a)yahoo.com> wrote:
> In article <7rh2a3Ful7U2(a)mid.individual.net>, cam(a)holyrood.ed.ac.uk
> says...
>> It doesn't have it all. It doesn't have MLU! :-)
>
> The lack of MLU in the A350 (the predecessor of the A550) is not really
> a problem in my experience. I do however not use a lot the tele lens.

I do use a 500mm lens quite often, and in my experience it is a
problem. At shutter speeds slower than around 1/300th sec it starts to
show itself, first as a ghost image several pixels displaced
vertically, and then as shutter speeds drop turning into a small
vertical smear. I suspect the shutter speed at which this shows up may
depend on the mass and rotational inertia of the lens fitted. Since my
500mm is a short light reflex lens, that may be what causes it to
start showing up at such an unexpectedly shutter speed.

It is however less of a problem with the A550 than with cameras with
poorer high ISO performance, because good high ISO performance means
it's easier to push the shutter speed up high enough to avoid it.

It should be noted that the size of the smearing due to vibration
caused by mirror slap is very much less than happened with 35mmm film
SLRs.

--
Chris Malcolm
From: Alfred Molon on
In article <7rld20Fo5gU1(a)mid.individual.net>, cam(a)holyrood.ed.ac.uk
says...
> It should be noted that the size of the smearing due to vibration
> caused by mirror slap is very much less than happened with 35mmm film
> SLRs.

Perhaps because in a full frame camera the mirror is larger than in an
APS-C camera.

All these problems of course disappear with the new EVIL cameras.
--

Alfred Molon
------------------------------
Olympus E-series DSLRs and micro 4/3 forum at
http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/MyOlympus/
http://myolympus.org/ photo sharing site
From: Better Info on
On Tue, 19 Jan 2010 13:29:39 +0100, Alfred Molon <alfred_molon(a)yahoo.com>
wrote:

>In article <7rld20Fo5gU1(a)mid.individual.net>, cam(a)holyrood.ed.ac.uk
>says...
>> It should be noted that the size of the smearing due to vibration
>> caused by mirror slap is very much less than happened with 35mmm film
>> SLRs.
>
>Perhaps because in a full frame camera the mirror is larger than in an
>APS-C camera.
>
>All these problems of course disappear with the new EVIL cameras.

Those problems are already gone, and have been gone for over a decade, in
every P&S camera ever made.

Catch up.