From: allr1 on

scharf.steven(a)geemail.com (SMS) wrote:


" http://batterydata.com "

" Earth's Independent Source for Unbiased Digital Camera Battery
Information "

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Or so you claim. (if you blow your own horn,
it's usually as a distraction)


What does ASAAR have to say about that?

From: sw2U on
In article <46d4dadb$0$27189$742ec2ed(a)news.sonic.net>,
scharf.steven(a)geemail.com says...
> I think this has been reported in some other forums, but Costco is now
> selling eneloops. The one near me just got them.
>
> Costco now sells a Sanyo eneloop "Power Pack" consisting of eight AA
> cells (2000mAH), four AAA cells (800mAH), two C size adapters, two D
> size adapters, and a charger for $26.49.
>

That's good news, because in my area, few places sell Eneloops, and
those few ONLY sell the batteries with a charger. I think I saw a
couple of packages of just batteries back around last Christmas,
but haven't seen any since. And the place that had those appears to
no longer sell Eneloops.

I get the impression Sanyo is better at making batteries than at
marketing them.

--
sw2U
From: Thomas T. Veldhouse on
Thomas T. Veldhouse <veldy71(a)yahoo.com> wrote:
> SMS <scharf.steven(a)geemail.com> wrote:
>>
>> Which claims? Everything on the site came from a reliable source, either
>> a battery manufacturer, charger manufacturer, semiconductor
>> manufacturer, or acknowledged battery expert.
>
> Really? Then provide your source for this:
>
> "On the other hand, Li-Ion battery packs have a number of technical advantages
> over NiMH batteries, including a much lower self-discharge rate, greater
> energy density (in terms of both weight and volume), far better
> low-temperature performance, a greater maximum number of charge/discharge
> cycles, and the ability for the camera to provide a fairly accurate indication
> of remaining capacity. This is why virtually every new digital SLR, and
> virtually every high end digital camera, uses Li-Ion battery packs. It's also
> why notebook computers, PDAs, cell phones, MP3 players, etc., use Li-Ion
> battery packs. After-market Li-Ion battery packs are available at very good
> prices, in fact if you look at the big picture and compute the total cost
> including accounting for the number of charge cycles, Li-Ion batteries are
> often less expensive. Now even some high-end rechargeable bicycle lights and
> flashlights are using Li-Ion batteries."
>
> ... "including a much lower self-discharge rate" ... is currently debatable
> with the advent of low self discharge NiMH batteries such as Eneloops.
>
> ... "a greater maximum number of charge/discharge cycles" ....
> ... "and the ability for the camera to provide a fairly accurate indication
> of remaining capacity" .... and I don't think any expert wrote that in the
> context that you are using it.
>

Funny how SMS simply goes silent with presented with an obvious answer and
counter to his question and assertion.

--
Thomas T. Veldhouse

We have more to fear from the bungling of the incompetent than from the
machinations of the wicked.

From: Thomas T. Veldhouse on
sw2U <nospam(a)spammenot.net> wrote:
>
> That's good news, because in my area, few places sell Eneloops, and
> those few ONLY sell the batteries with a charger. I think I saw a
> couple of packages of just batteries back around last Christmas,
> but haven't seen any since. And the place that had those appears to
> no longer sell Eneloops.
>
> I get the impression Sanyo is better at making batteries than at
> marketing them.
>

Most retailers have been slow to understand the meaning of "low
self-discharge", so I suspect they haven't jumped to put them on endcaps.
To take this thought further, they are probably hesistant to carry multiple
brands of NiMH batteries that are only 2000-2100mAh when they can sell those
2500-2700mAh batteries knowing they have "bigger" numbers. They are slowly
learning however.

BTW ... you can always buy Eneloops at a good price on Amazon.com. My last
purchase was 8-AA Eneloops for $19.99. I bought a few Nexcell C and D
adapters and have these batteries in clocks, digital thermometers, remotes,
certain medical equipment, mouse and keyboard, etc. All these are
applications where the traditional NiMH batteries would have failed due to
self-discharge, but is no longer a problem with these new batteries. One
healthy star for me and the environment.

--
Thomas T. Veldhouse

We have more to fear from the bungling of the incompetent than from the
machinations of the wicked.

From: ASAAR on
On Thu, 30 Aug 2007 12:51:24 GMT, Thomas T. Veldhouse wrote:

>>> Which claims? Everything on the site came from a reliable source,
>>> either a battery manufacturer, charger manufacturer, semiconductor
>>> manufacturer, or acknowledged battery expert.
> . . .
>
> Funny how SMS simply goes silent with presented with an obvious
> answer and counter to his question and assertion.

I noticed that long ago, too. The source of one of the quotes on
his website is just a reply from this newsgroup from someone that
simply used more NiMH batteries and chargers than most of the others
in this newsgroup, but AFAIK was not a battery manufacturer, a
charger manufacturer, a semiconductor manufacturer or an
acknowledged battery expert. I'm sure that if you or I had shared
SMS's Li-Ion bias and often parroted his statements, we too might
have been quoted on his website and been lumped in with all of the
other "acknowledged battery experts". Acknowledged by SMS, that is.