From: SMS on
SMS wrote:

<snip>

> I'll add this list to the web site, along with more information on
> D-SLRs and AA batteries, since there appears to be some confusion about it.

I've added the information on vertical grips to the web site, including
vertical grips for Canon, Nikon, and Pentax. The aftermarket Pentax
vertical grips allow you to use Li-Ion battery packs on the K100D, K10D
and istD-S/L (or twelve AA cells). I have links to the manufacturer of
the Pentax grips, which apparently sells direct.

I'd put a bookmark to the section at the beginning of the page under
"Recent Additions."

If anyone knows of any other after-market vertical grips that I've
missed, please let me know.

Steve
"http://batterydata.com"
In Google, enter "nimh versus li-ion" then click on "I'm Feeling Lucky"
From: SMS on
SMS wrote:
> SMS wrote:
>
> <snip>
>
>> I'll add this list to the web site, along with more information on
>> D-SLRs and AA batteries, since there appears to be some confusion
>> about it.
>
> I've added the information on vertical grips to the web site, including
> vertical grips for Canon, Nikon, and Pentax. The aftermarket Pentax
> vertical grips allow you to use Li-Ion battery packs on the K100D, K10D
> and istD-S/L (or twelve AA cells). I have links to the manufacturer of
> the Pentax grips, which apparently sells direct.
>
> I'd put a bookmark to the section at the beginning of the page under
> "Recent Additions."

s.b. I've put a bookmark...
From: ASAAR on
On Tue, 04 Sep 2007 13:08:34 GMT, Thomas T. Veldhouse wrote:

>> That gives you 12 eneloops for $26.49, a fair price, but not a very
>> good price. If you have no use for all 8 AA and 4 AAA cells, that
>> makes it an even poorer deal unless you can sell some to a friend.
>
> 12 eneloop batteries for $26.49 is a VERY GOOD price. Where can
> you find them for less in either AA or AAA? Like I said, about the
> best price I have seend for 8 is $19.99 from Amazon which is about
> $29.99 for 12 batteries ... about $2.50 more.

I haven't seen better prices in the few stores I've seen them in,
but I believe that a number of people have posted messages saying
that they've seen or bought eneloops or Hybrids for a lower price.
Perhaps Walmart. As others have said, WalMart's prices vary from
store to store, and I have no local WalMarts. But as I indicated,
even if you consider slightly more than $2/cell to be a very good
price, it may not be if you're forced to buy many more than can be
used. Some may have a use for that many, but others would have to
go out of their way to put them all to good use. For example, I
have a clock and a couple of remotes that use AAA batteries, but
even though an eneloop would work well in them I wouldn't use them
in these devices, since much cheaper alkalines would work just as
well, and only need to be replaced every two or three years. If the
Costco deal was available with 12 AA eneloops instead of 8 AAs and 4
AAAs for that price I'd find it more appealing. YMMV.

From: SMS on
Thomas T. Veldhouse wrote:

> Most lower capacity batteries claim 1000 cycles, so I suspect it has nothing
> to do with the charger; afterall, the vast majority of people out there will
> NOT be using the Sanyo Eneloop charger.

But the maximum cycles that are batteries are based on the ideal
charging regimen, so it would not be unreasonable for Sanyo to base
their claim on using the eneloop charger.

The other brands tend to use weasel statements, i.e. "In absolute best
conditions, NiMH batteries can last up to 1000 recharges."

Of course "up to" is a weasel statement already, but they even qualify
it with "In absolute best conditions."

Look at "http://www.mpoweruk.com/nimh.htm" where they say up to 3000
cycles have been demonstrated, though the typical cycle count is around 500.
From: ASAAR on
On Tue, 04 Sep 2007 16:44:41 GMT, Thomas T. Veldhouse wrote:

>> The charger is fine. It's slow but for most people charging is done
>> overnight anyway, and it's very small. They probably did a low-current
>> charger to extend the battery life, which is how they are able to claim
>> 1000 cycles.
>
> Most lower capacity batteries claim 1000 cycles, so I suspect it has nothing
> to do with the charger; afterall, the vast majority of people out there will
> NOT be using the Sanyo Eneloop charger.

Most higher capacity batteries also claim 1,000 cycles, and I
agree that the charger isn't the main culprit that reduces the
number of cycles. It's the user, that either doesn't treat the NiMH
batteries properly, or uses them in devices that by their nature
aren't well suited for NiMH batteries. The included charger may
work well with new batteries, but as it only has a single LED to
indicate when *all* cells have finished charging, it's not able to
show you when a single cell has lost a significant amount of
capacity, or which one it is. When that happened several years ago
to one cell (out of 4) with a set of 1,500mAh NiMH batteries from
Radio Shack, I tossed the bad one and started using the remaining
three in a portable radio. They're still going strong, and this
particular radio is another that has no difficulty showing steadily
declining battery voltage in its 9 segment battery meter, which SMS
continues to say shouldn't be possible, at least in affordable
devices.