From: Bill Tuthill on
John Turco <jtur(a)concentric.net> wrote:
>
> Sorry, man, but I've gone through the hassles of Li-Ion packs, with my
> Kodak digicams that use them (P850, DX6490 and V603). They may have
> their place, and yet, I'm still glad I'll be able to stick ubiquitous
> AA batteries, in my new Pentax 6.1 megapixel DSLR.

I suspect everybody who has owned a digicam for more than 3-4 years
feels that way.

Toyota Motors recently announced a further delay (of another 2-3 years)
in the introduction of lithium-ion batteries to replace NiMH batteries
in their hybrid vehicles. Warranty issues, I bet.

From: SMS on
Bill Tuthill wrote:
> John Turco <jtur(a)concentric.net> wrote:
>> Sorry, man, but I've gone through the hassles of Li-Ion packs, with my
>> Kodak digicams that use them (P850, DX6490 and V603). They may have
>> their place, and yet, I'm still glad I'll be able to stick ubiquitous
>> AA batteries, in my new Pentax 6.1 megapixel DSLR.
>
> I suspect everybody who has owned a digicam for more than 3-4 years
> feels that way.

You suspect wrong. I've had a Canon G2 for more than five years. I still
use it a lot. I've bought two batteries in those five years, one for a
spare, and one as a replacement, for a total cost of about $25 including
shipping.

In the mean time, the AA powered cameras are rarely used any more. Too
much of a hassle dealing with AA cells. Now with the eneloop batteries
the situation is improved and one of them gets used more by my son.

There are very good reasons why virtually every new D-SLR (except
Pentax) and most higher end point and shoot cameras use Li-Ion packs.
Consumers don't want to put up with the hassle of AA cells.
From: ASAAR on
On Thu, 06 Sep 2007 10:08:23 -0700, SMS wrote:

> There are very good reasons why virtually every new D-SLR (except
> Pentax) and most higher end point and shoot cameras use Li-Ion packs.
> Consumers don't want to put up with the hassle of AA cells.

This illustrates quite nicely why you can't be trusted. Just a
couple of days ago you said that *no* DSLRs used AA batteries
because it was beyond their capability to provide enough power to
operate them. Then shortly after I named several (all made by
Pentax), despite the fact that you say that you don't see my
messages, you almost immediately started saying that while there may
be a few such DSLRs in existence, they are so underpowered by the AA
batteries that they have performance issues, which cause reviewers
to not rate them highly. I then showed with fairly extensive quotes
from the review that you very selectively quoted from showing that
you were totally wrong. The Pentax DLSRs not only got good ratings,
they also provided from good to excellent battery life, being
comparable to DSLRs from Nikon that use Li-Ion batteries.

Now, again, without apologizing for your misstatements, you've
apparently changed your tune once again. Now you seem to accept
that DSLRs can be more than adequately powered by AA batteries, but
have fallen back on your very old, very specious argument that it's
too much of a hassle to use AA batteries. Too much of a hassle to
change only four AA cells that can provide up to a couple of
thousand shots per charge? Too much of a hassle to use eneloop type
batteries that have a very low self-discharge rates, and are able to
safely go far longer between charges than Li-Ion batteries? You
continue to show that far from being (in your own words) Earth's
unbiased source of battery information, you're Earth's most biased
source of battery information, and have little credibility with
anyone that has only modest knowledge of batteries and cameras.
Honest sources of information don't try to hide their mistakes.

From: ASAAR on
On Thu, 06 Sep 2007 14:20:56 GMT, Thomas T. Veldhouse wrote:

> Put an Eneloop in your clocks and you might change your mind.
> At $0.30 cents per alkaline, it will pay for itself in 9 charges ... so
> the remaining 491 charges are free ;-) Granted, you will probably
> only have to charge the battery every 7 or 8 months :-)

There are clocks and there are clocks. I bought a pair made by
Casio about 16 years ago. They use a single AA battery and are
electronic (LCD display) rather than mechanical. So far I've only
had to change the batteries in each twice. If eneloops were used in
these, I might have to recharge them once every two years.
Correction. Change "have to" to "want to" :)

From: Bill Tuthill on
SMS <scharf.steven(a)geemail.com> wrote:
>
> There are very good reasons why virtually every new D-SLR (except
> Pentax) and most higher end point and shoot cameras use Li-Ion packs.
> Consumers don't want to put up with the hassle of AA cells.

Fujifilm's current-model Finepix S9100 and the newly-announced S8000fd
both take AA batteries, and I would definitely label them high-end digicams,
ZLR if you like. Same goes for the Canon Powershot S3 and S5 IS.