From: SMS on
Ron Hunter wrote:

> It might also be due to most DSLRs being used in 'studio' applications.
> In the field, AA batteries may be preferable due to their ubiquitous
> availability.

At least as an emergency back-up. The vertical grip is an acceptable
back-up venue for AA cells. Li-Ion packs are inexpensive and much more
convenient. Six eneloop cells cost around the same a Li-Ion pack (i.e.
from Amazon, the eneloop cells have an effective cost of $2.50 each when
purchased in eight-packs, for a total cost of $15. A 2000mAH/7.4V BP511
after-market Li-Ion pack is about $12. The smart battery for the newer
Nikon's is $18.50 for a 1500mAH 7.4V pack.

When you had to buy $60 li-ion packs from the manufacturer then there
was a real case for AA cells, at least in terms of price. This is long gone.
From: Thomas T. Veldhouse on
ASAAR <caught(a)22.com> wrote:
>
> There are clocks and there are clocks. I bought a pair made by
> Casio about 16 years ago. They use a single AA battery and are
> electronic (LCD display) rather than mechanical. So far I've only
> had to change the batteries in each twice. If eneloops were used in
> these, I might have to recharge them once every two years.
> Correction. Change "have to" to "want to" :)
>

Agreed ... there probably isn't much benefit to that.

--
Thomas T. Veldhouse

We have more to fear from the bungling of the incompetent than from the
machinations of the wicked.

From: Thomas T. Veldhouse on
Ron Hunter <rphunter(a)charter.net> wrote:
> Let's see. 491 charges at, say 1 recharge/6 months (to make the math
> easy) is 245 years. I am 64, so unless I plan to live about another 100
> years, it probably isn't worth the difference, not to mention the
> hassle. Some things just don't make sense for the 'real world'.

So you won't last as long as the battery ;-)

Anyway, whatever works for you. I get longer life out of the AA Eneloop then
alkaline in my clocks and keep spares charged ... so for me, it is just a swap
like any other when they go dead ... and no new landfill.

--
Thomas T. Veldhouse

We have more to fear from the bungling of the incompetent than from the
machinations of the wicked.

From: Thomas T. Veldhouse on
Bill Tuthill <ccreekin(a)yahoo.com> wrote:
>
> Toyota Motors recently announced a further delay (of another 2-3 years)
> in the introduction of lithium-ion batteries to replace NiMH batteries
> in their hybrid vehicles. Warranty issues, I bet.
>

To my knowledge, they still haven't got LiIon (or poly) to last long enough to
make them cost effective for their owners. Replacing an $5000+ battery every
few years is not exactly a good selling point. Also, LiIon has narrow
charging limits and if there is a failure in the charging circuitry, there
could be a nice fire ... like the laptop batteries. Still, if/when they
finally achieve what they are after, I suspect we will see the technology
trickle down to portable devices and get much longer lifespans on our LiIon
batteries.

--
Thomas T. Veldhouse

We have more to fear from the bungling of the incompetent than from the
machinations of the wicked.

From: Thomas T. Veldhouse on
Ron Hunter <rphunter(a)charter.net> wrote:
>
> It might also be due to most DSLRs being used in 'studio' applications.
> In the field, AA batteries may be preferable due to their ubiquitous
> availability.

I dare say that most, professional or otherwise, are NOT used in 'studio'
applications.

--
Thomas T. Veldhouse

We have more to fear from the bungling of the incompetent than from the
machinations of the wicked.