From: Thomas T. Veldhouse on
SMS <scharf.steven(a)geemail.com> wrote:
>
> At least as an emergency back-up. The vertical grip is an acceptable
> back-up venue for AA cells. Li-Ion packs are inexpensive and much more
> convenient. Six eneloop cells cost around the same a Li-Ion pack (i.e.
> from Amazon, the eneloop cells have an effective cost of $2.50 each when
> purchased in eight-packs, for a total cost of $15. A 2000mAH/7.4V BP511
> after-market Li-Ion pack is about $12. The smart battery for the newer
> Nikon's is $18.50 for a 1500mAH 7.4V pack.
>

What?

The MB-D200 takes two LiIon or six AA? You can get six Eneloop for about $15.
Each of the LiIon is $30 to $45, depending on whether you buy Nikon or third
party. Further, you get 12000mAh out of the Eneloops in that grip and 3000mAh
with the LiIon batteries. So, if the weight doesn't bother you, the AA is
definitely the way to go.

--
Thomas T. Veldhouse

We have more to fear from the bungling of the incompetent than from the
machinations of the wicked.

From: SMS on
Thomas T. Veldhouse wrote:
> Bill Tuthill <ccreekin(a)yahoo.com> wrote:
>> Toyota Motors recently announced a further delay (of another 2-3 years)
>> in the introduction of lithium-ion batteries to replace NiMH batteries
>> in their hybrid vehicles. Warranty issues, I bet.
>>
>
> To my knowledge, they still haven't got LiIon (or poly) to last long enough to
> make them cost effective for their owners. Replacing an $5000+ battery every
> few years is not exactly a good selling point. Also, LiIon has narrow
> charging limits and if there is a failure in the charging circuitry, there
> could be a nice fire ... like the laptop batteries. Still, if/when they
> finally achieve what they are after, I suspect we will see the technology
> trickle down to portable devices and get much longer lifespans on our LiIon
> batteries.

There are some after-market plug-in hybrid systems that use Li-Ion, but
it's very expensive. It's really only cost-effective for high mileage
fleet vehicles.

A lot of people would be thrilled with a plug-in hybrid that could go 30
miles on batteries.
From: SMS on
Thomas T. Veldhouse wrote:

> What?
>
> The MB-D200 takes two LiIon or six AA? You can get six Eneloop for about $15.
> Each of the LiIon is $30 to $45, depending on whether you buy Nikon or third
> party.

EN-EL3e Battery

"http://sterlingtek.com/enbafornid2d.html" ($18.49/1500 mAH)
"http://www.shentech.com/nienreliba71.html" ($17.00/1620 mAH)

There are probably less expensive sources, I just am familiar with these
two having purchased items from them in the past. I probably would pass
on Shentech though and stick with a company that specializes in
batteries. My experience with Shentech was okay, but not spectacular (it
was not for batteries).

Another source is
"http://www.digitalinnovationsny.com/items/Item.aspx?itemid=5449263"
($17.49/1900mAH).

The EN-EL3e is one of the more expensive packs due to the built-in
micro-controller. It took a while for the after-market EN-EL3e packs to
appear. I'm glad to have three Canon devices that use the ubiquitous and
inexpensive BP511/BP512, though that was not a factor in choosing them.

I've added the EN-EL3e to the table on the web site that compares
battery costs. I've also added eneloops. An interesting comparison is
the net cost of six eneloops versus one EN-EL3e. The eneloops are
slightly less if you assume 500 cycles for the eneloops and 300 cycles
for the EN-EL3e (100 cycles/year for three years), but the reality is
that the difference in costs are inconsequential. For the more expensive
Li-Ion packs you're slightly better off with eneloops if cost per
cycle is the only criteria you use. For the less expensive Li-Ion packs
you're slightly better off, cost-wise, with Li-Ion.

Steve
"http://batterydata.com"
From: Thomas T. Veldhouse on
SMS <scharf.steven(a)geemail.com> wrote:
> Thomas T. Veldhouse wrote:
>
>> What?
>>
>> The MB-D200 takes two LiIon or six AA? You can get six Eneloop for about $15.
>> Each of the LiIon is $30 to $45, depending on whether you buy Nikon or third
>> party.
>
> EN-EL3e Battery
>
> "http://sterlingtek.com/enbafornid2d.html" ($18.49/1500 mAH)
> "http://www.shentech.com/nienreliba71.html" ($17.00/1620 mAH)
>
> There are probably less expensive sources, I just am familiar with these
> two having purchased items from them in the past. I probably would pass
> on Shentech though and stick with a company that specializes in
> batteries. My experience with Shentech was okay, but not spectacular (it
> was not for batteries).
>
> Another source is
> "http://www.digitalinnovationsny.com/items/Item.aspx?itemid=5449263"
> ($17.49/1900mAH).
>
> The EN-EL3e is one of the more expensive packs due to the built-in
> micro-controller. It took a while for the after-market EN-EL3e packs to
> appear. I'm glad to have three Canon devices that use the ubiquitous and
> inexpensive BP511/BP512, though that was not a factor in choosing them.
>
> I've added the EN-EL3e to the table on the web site that compares
> battery costs. I've also added eneloops. An interesting comparison is
> the net cost of six eneloops versus one EN-EL3e. The eneloops are
> slightly less if you assume 500 cycles for the eneloops and 300 cycles
> for the EN-EL3e (100 cycles/year for three years), but the reality is
> that the difference in costs are inconsequential. For the more expensive
> Li-Ion packs you're slightly better off with eneloops if cost per
> cycle is the only criteria you use. For the less expensive Li-Ion packs
> you're slightly better off, cost-wise, with Li-Ion.
>

And of course, with the Eneloops, you get three to four times the capacity.
If you use standard high capacity 2500mAh NiMH AA batteries, then you will get
15000mAh total and about four times the capacity.

--
Thomas T. Veldhouse

We have more to fear from the bungling of the incompetent than from the
machinations of the wicked.

From: SMS on
Thomas T. Veldhouse wrote:

> And of course, with the Eneloops, you get three to four times the capacity.
> If you use standard high capacity 2500mAh NiMH AA batteries, then you will get
> 15000mAh total and about four times the capacity.

Huh, where do you get 4x the capacity for eneloop?

Here's my math:

eneloop: 6 x 2000mAH x 1.2V = 14.4WH
1900mAH EN-EL3e: 1 x 1900mAH * 7.4V =14.1W

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I don't see where you're getting 4x the
capacity from.

If you get the maximum number of cycles (1000) out of the eneloop, and
the maximum number of cycles out of the Li-Ion, then you'll get about 2x
the use out of the eneloops, but I don't know where you got the idea
about 4x the capacity.

Steve
"http://batterydata.com"