From: Ron Hunter on
ASAAR wrote:
> On Fri, 07 Sep 2007 03:56:36 -0500, Ron Hunter wrote:
>
>>> There are clocks and there are clocks. I bought a pair made by
>>> Casio about 16 years ago. They use a single AA battery and are
>>> electronic (LCD display) rather than mechanical. So far I've only
>>> had to change the batteries in each twice. If eneloops were used in
>>> these, I might have to recharge them once every two years.
>>> Correction. Change "have to" to "want to" :)
>> I have a little 'egg clock' that eats a set of AAA alkaline batteries in
>> about 2-3 months (it lights when touched). Will probably put eneloops
>> in it next time.
>
> Yep. There's no one rule that fits all. Any type of AA/AAA
> battery can be preferable, and if the drain is extremely low, as in
> the clocks I mentioned above, even cheap non-alkaline batteries (aka
> Heavy Duty) can perform very well. I discovered this about 15 years
> ago when the first AAA battery I used in a new (gray market), tiny
> Sony AM/FM radio was one of those cheap non-alkalines. I expected
> that I'd have to replace the single AAA cell within a few hours, but
> to my surprise, it lasted, over a period of several weeks, for about
> 40 to 50 hours. An alkaline AAA wouldn't have done much better.
> How long do estimate the batteries would last in your 'egg clock' if
> it was used very infrequently, say, once/month?
>

Not sure. It is able to display time, temp, date, and alarm, and lights
up if touched, so it probably isn't really feasible to just leave it
alone on the shelf. Probably as long as any other clock, but then maybe
not. The way the battery compartment is configured, I suspect it uses
one battery for the electronic functions, and two for the light.
Strangely, the LCD display goes dim, and it beeps for a battery change
long before the light fails to come on.
From: Ron Hunter on
Thomas T. Veldhouse wrote:
> Bill Tuthill <ccreekin(a)yahoo.com> wrote:
>> Toyota Motors recently announced a further delay (of another 2-3 years)
>> in the introduction of lithium-ion batteries to replace NiMH batteries
>> in their hybrid vehicles. Warranty issues, I bet.
>>
>
> To my knowledge, they still haven't got LiIon (or poly) to last long enough to
> make them cost effective for their owners. Replacing an $5000+ battery every
> few years is not exactly a good selling point. Also, LiIon has narrow
> charging limits and if there is a failure in the charging circuitry, there
> could be a nice fire ... like the laptop batteries. Still, if/when they
> finally achieve what they are after, I suspect we will see the technology
> trickle down to portable devices and get much longer lifespans on our LiIon
> batteries.
>
My brother drives a Honda Civic Hybrid. He has had the car for a few
years now, and I don't recall him having to replace the batteries, yet.
I will probably hear him screaming about the price from here, even
though he lives 300 miles away. Grin.
The batteries are used as 'mildly' as possible to prolong their life.
From: Ron Hunter on
SMS wrote:
> Thomas T. Veldhouse wrote:
>> Bill Tuthill <ccreekin(a)yahoo.com> wrote:
>>> Toyota Motors recently announced a further delay (of another 2-3 years)
>>> in the introduction of lithium-ion batteries to replace NiMH batteries
>>> in their hybrid vehicles. Warranty issues, I bet.
>>>
>>
>> To my knowledge, they still haven't got LiIon (or poly) to last long
>> enough to
>> make them cost effective for their owners. Replacing an $5000+
>> battery every
>> few years is not exactly a good selling point. Also, LiIon has narrow
>> charging limits and if there is a failure in the charging circuitry,
>> there
>> could be a nice fire ... like the laptop batteries. Still, if/when they
>> finally achieve what they are after, I suspect we will see the technology
>> trickle down to portable devices and get much longer lifespans on our
>> LiIon
>> batteries.
>
> There are some after-market plug-in hybrid systems that use Li-Ion, but
> it's very expensive. It's really only cost-effective for high mileage
> fleet vehicles.
>
> A lot of people would be thrilled with a plug-in hybrid that could go 30
> miles on batteries.

Not me. My wife wouldn't be able to go from home to bingo and back.
How she can put 70 miles on the car driving to and from a bingo place I
used to not understand, until I tried following her directions on how to
get someplace. It's a wonder she EVER finds her way home.
From: ASAAR on
On Sat, 08 Sep 2007 03:40:59 -0500, Ron Hunter wrote:

>> How long do estimate the batteries would last in your 'egg clock' if
>> it was used very infrequently, say, once/month?
>
> Not sure. It is able to display time, temp, date, and alarm, and lights
> up if touched, so it probably isn't really feasible to just leave it
> alone on the shelf. Probably as long as any other clock, but then maybe
> not. The way the battery compartment is configured, I suspect it uses
> one battery for the electronic functions, and two for the light.
> Strangely, the LCD display goes dim, and it beeps for a battery change
> long before the light fails to come on.

It's a rather odd design, but not too odd. I have several old
radios that use one or two small alkalines to run the radio's
internal clock and maintain station presets, and a greater number of
(usually) larger alkalines to play the radio. I found that in two
of the radios, when the clock/backup batteries go dead, even if the
main radio batteries are fresh, the radio won't operate. I guess
that your little clock was designed so the two batteries would allow
it to display some affection and it's disappointed that you don't
fondle it more. At least it won't get sick from inattention like a
Furby or die like a Tamagotchi. :)

http://www.mimitchi.com/html/ftips.htm

From: Bill Tuthill on
Ron Hunter <rphunter(a)charter.net> wrote:
>
> My brother drives a Honda Civic Hybrid. He has had the car for a few
> years now, and I don't recall him having to replace the batteries, yet.
> I will probably hear him screaming about the price from here, even
> though he lives 300 miles away. Grin.
> The batteries are used as 'mildly' as possible to prolong their life.

The Civic Hybrid uses NiMH batteries, so you would expect them to last
longer than if the Civic used lithium-ion batteries.