From: Allen on
Thomas T. Veldhouse wrote:
> SMS <scharf.steven(a)geemail.com> wrote:
>> John Turco wrote:
>>
>>> Locally, Wal-Mart has 4-packs of Kodak "pre-charged" (i.e., eneloop
>>> equivalent) Ni-MH AA cells, at $7.88 USD, apiece. Three of those only
>>> add up to $23.64, which beats Costco's deal, by nearly $3.
>> Costco includes a charger and the C & D adapters.
>
> Not my Costco (in Minnesota). They only sell Sony (4-2700mAh AA and 2-1000mAh
> AAA) and Duracell batteries and chargers. The Sony Charger claims to do a
> conditioning charge as well. No Sanyo products at the Costco that I frequent.
>
In Austin (TX, not MN) the Costco Eneloops are packaged in a blue
plastic case, which contains 12 AA, 3 or 4 AAA, a charger, and adapters
to use AAs in C and D cell devices, all for $26.99. I haven't bought any
because I bought 8 Rayovacs early on, and don't need any more. I have
doubts about the worth of the C and D adapters.
Allen
From: SMS on
Thomas T. Veldhouse wrote:
> SMS <scharf.steven(a)geemail.com> wrote:
>>> Pentax isn't among the "top tier manufacturers," in your opinion?
>> Canon and Nikon are the top tier. Olympus, Pentax, and Sony (formerly
>> the Konica-Minolta D-SLRs) are second tier.
>
> Defined by what? Market share? Mind share? Revenue?
>
> Who decided the cutoff between first and second tier?

The consumers and the companies themselves.

The top tier manufacturers will cover entire spectrum of digital SLRs
from entry-level to "prosumer" to professional (just as they did with
film SLRs).

They will have a complete selection of lenses and flashes in
entry-level, prosumer, and professional models. They will have a
complete selection of accessories at all the levels (though Nikon does
fall a little short at the entry level).

The second tier manufacturers usually address only the entry level in
terms of bodies and lenses--there's no upgrade path to a professional
full frame model. They also often often don't offer a full line of
accessories, relying on third party after-market companies to step in
and fill the void for products that they don't have the resources to
develop.

That's not to say there is anything wrong with the products from the
second tier, they often offer features not available from the top tier
manufacturers, such is the in-camera image stabilization on Pentax
K100D. Unfortunately they often omit more standard features, either
because they don't have a cross-license agreement with the patent
holder, or because they just don't think the feature is worth including.

As Dvorak wrote, "Then we have the once-great Pentax fumbling around in
the digital game, late to the party and acting like a rudderless ship.
It seems to have a camera or two that could become popular, but the
brand name is failing it�the company looks too much like an also-ran."

Actually nothing has changed much from the days of film SLRs. Olympus,
Pentax, and Minolta were always considered second tier.
From: SMS on
Thomas T. Veldhouse wrote:
> ASAAR <caught(a)22.com> wrote:
>> A pitifully low featured, anemic charger, and as you also noted,
>> the C cell adapter doesn't provide a perfect fit. Few people would
>> really need those adapters, which might in any case damage
>> rechargeable cells if they're not used to power digital devices.
>> This is normally the type of charger that you tell people to avoid
>> getting, and I'd agree. If that's the only NiMH charger a person
>> had, I'd recommend retiring it and getting a better one, possibly
>> only using the "freeby" one included with the eneloops as an
>> emergency backup charger.
>>
>
> I have had no trouble using the C adapters. Why do you feel it would damage
> the cell? It is 1.2V like any other and the issue are the same as far as
> putting these in series if the are AA or C.

The AA battery is a little bit longer than a C cell, but for devices
with the usual spring loaded contacts it's not an issue.

I don't know where he got the idea that using the adapter would damage
the cells. Certainly there are C & D cell sized NiMH batteries that are
used in non-digital devices without any issues. It's probably just
another thing he made up.

As to the charger, yes it's slow, though it's not an issue for most
people, with the advantage being longer battery life. It does charge
individual cells, and it has temperature sensing and voltage sensing for
end-of-charge. The other downsides are that each slot doesn't have its
own indicator, and it only is for 100-120V.


From: SMS on
Allen wrote:

> In Austin (TX, not MN) the Costco Eneloops are packaged in a blue
> plastic case, which contains 12 AA, 3 or 4 AAA, a charger, and adapters
> to use AAs in C and D cell devices, all for $26.99. I haven't bought any
> because I bought 8 Rayovacs early on, and don't need any more. I have
> doubts about the worth of the C and D adapters.
> Allen

I think the goal is to try to facilitate converting all your battery
powered devices, including C & D cell devices like flashlights, to
rechargeable cells. For some people there is no value in the adapters,
for some there is. I'll probably use the adapters at some point, though
it wasn't a deciding factor in buying the set of eneloops.
From: SMS on
Allen wrote:

> In Austin (TX, not MN) the Costco Eneloops are packaged in a blue
> plastic case, which contains 12 AA, 3 or 4 AAA, a charger, and adapters
> to use AAs in C and D cell devices, all for $26.99. I haven't bought any
> because I bought 8 Rayovacs early on, and don't need any more. I have
> doubts about the worth of the C and D adapters.

Are you sure about the 12 AA?

This is what I bought at Costco in California,
"http://nordicgroup.us/battery/eneloopcostco.jpg" and it's got 8 AA and
4 AAA.