From: SMS on
Thomas T. Veldhouse wrote:
> SMS <scharf.steven(a)geemail.com> wrote:
>>> Defined by what? Market share? Mind share? Revenue?
>>>
>>> Who decided the cutoff between first and second tier?
>> The consumers and the companies themselves.
>>
>> The top tier manufacturers will cover entire spectrum of digital SLRs
>> from entry-level to "prosumer" to professional (just as they did with
>> film SLRs).
>>
>
> So, you decided on how to apply this label yourself, right?

Not me. Go do some googling on the subject. Try "slr second tier" to start.

> Do you consider Leica second teir? How about Hasslebrad?

Hasslebrad?

> I guess, what I am after is less metaphorical phrasing, as it communicates a
> position of certainty that isn't accurate. Perhaps, using the phrase prefix
> "I would consider ..." would reduce the misleading metaphor and illustrate
> your opinion.

If it were my opinion, I would prefix it with IMVAIO or IMHO.
From: ASAAR on
On Tue, 11 Sep 2007 19:26:57 GMT, Thomas T. Veldhouse wrote:

> We also have a few cheap flashlights I have considered putting
> D adapters into, but haven't desired to put batteries in a flashlight
> that cost more than the flashlight itself ;-)

You could get one of the new MagLites that use high power LEDs.
They are *very* bright, have a natural (not very blue) color and can
even focus. They're available in 2, 3 and 4 cell versions for C and
D cells. There are also MagLite LED kits to convert older MagLites.
Unless the lights are used very frequently, it still makes more
sense to keep using alkalines batteries since they last so long. A
2 AA cell LED version was recently added to MagLite's line.

From: SMS on
Thomas T. Veldhouse wrote:

> Don't have doubts. We have a mid-priced elipitical trainer that uses D
> batteries for several mechanical and control functions and the adapters work
> great in it with the 2100mAh Rayovac Hybrids in them. I use a C adapter in a
> a large clock and have no trouble so far. We also have a few cheap
> flashlights I have considered putting D adapters into, but haven't desired to
> put batteries in a flashlight that cost more than the flashlight itself ;-)

Well the solution is obvious--buy more expensive flashlights.

I prefer C cell flashlights, but unfortunately the selection is more
limited than D cell models. With the Maglight 3W Luxeon LED flashlights
you can buy AA or D cell models, but for the C cell models you have to
buy a regular non-LED model then buy the retrofit kit. You really want
to use rechargeables with these flashlights as they draw a lot of
current, 3 watts at 2.4 volts is 1.25A. The eneloops would be ideal as
often flashlights are not used for long periods of time, but when you
need it to work it has to work.

The Maglite has a big advantage over most other LED flashlights because
the spot to flood beam adjustment still works with the LED conversion.
Very few 3W LED flashlights have this capability.
From: Ron Hunter on
ASAAR wrote:
> On Tue, 11 Sep 2007 17:46:37 GMT, Thomas T. Veldhouse wrote:
>
>>> A pitifully low featured, anemic charger, and as you also noted,
>>> the C cell adapter doesn't provide a perfect fit. Few people would
>>> really need those adapters, which might in any case damage
>>> rechargeable cells if they're not used to power digital devices.
>>> This is normally the type of charger that you tell people to avoid
>>> getting, and I'd agree. If that's the only NiMH charger a person
>>> had, I'd recommend retiring it and getting a better one, possibly
>>> only using the "freeby" one included with the eneloops as an
>>> emergency backup charger.
>> I have had no trouble using the C adapters. Why do you feel it would
>> damage the cell? It is 1.2V like any other and the issue are the same as
>> far as putting these in series if the are AA or C.
>
> Unlike the shill/troll, you'll probably understand what I meant.
> I've also used C and D cell adapters without problems, but haven't
> found very much use for them. The important thing to note was that
> I said that damage could occur if the adapters would be used to
> power *non-digital* devices. I'm not aware of any digital cameras
> that use C or D cells. But there are many toys, radios, tape
> players/recorders, flashlights, boomboxes, etc. that use C and D
> cells, and unlike digital devices, they usually do NOT automatically
> turn off when the voltage gets too low. That's almost certain to
> damage one or more cells unless you're *very* careful, due to cell
> reversal. The greater the number of cells used, the greater the
> risk. Devices that use only two cells aren't at too much risk, but
> it's very easy to damage cells in devices that use three or more.
> Many radios use 4 cells. Flashlights are commonly available that
> use up to 6 cells, and most boomboxes use 8.
>

It seems to me that C and D cell adapters would be a good application
only on those devices that shut off, as you said, and on the LED upgrade
add-ons for some flashlights you can now buy. Replacing an incandescent
bulb with LED, and D cells with AA cells would be feasible.
From: SMS on
Ron Hunter wrote:

> It seems to me that C and D cell adapters would be a good application
> only on those devices that shut off, as you said, and on the LED upgrade
> add-ons for some flashlights you can now buy. Replacing an incandescent
> bulb with LED, and D cells with AA cells would be feasible.

Well maybe for kid's toys it's a legitimate concern to worry about
polarity reversal caused by unintentionally leaving a toy on, but for
adults that are more responsible about turning things off when done it's
not a big issue. I do mention about the cell reversal issue on the web
site, and warn about not draining cells all the way down.