From: Richard Karash on
In article <-YSdnQT9KZx4gwzVnZ2dnUVZ_judnZ2d(a)giganews.com>, David J.
Littleboy <davidjl(a)gol.com> wrote:

> "Richard Karash" <Richard(a)Karash.com> wrote:
>
> > - Then, open same file in Camera Raw (Bridge... select photo... Open
> > in Camera Raw).
>
> Bridge may or may not be the right thing, ...

Bridge is the only way I know to open a jpg/tiff file in Camera Raw.

> ... but Camera Raw is definately the
> wrong tool to use for film scans. Camera Raw is for converting digital
> camera raw files, and only handles 3 colors per pixel RGB matrix images
> (tiff/jpeg) as a convenience.

I like that convenience... I like the sliders for Temp, Tint, Blacks,
Recovery, Vibrance, Clarity, etc. I don't think these are available
except in Camera Raw.

I appreciate your comment David, but is there a reason not to want to
use these in the workflow, taking the scanner output and getting it
into Photoshop in good form?

> Use Photoshop iteself for scanned files; it has the tools you need. (I seem
> to remember that Vuescan can store a "raw" file that includes the IR
> information also. I'd think that only Vuescan would be able to deal with
> such files.)

This is interesting... What would you do with the IR channel within
Photoshop? I found the automatic cleaning in the scanner software
(Digital ICE) just fabulous.

> I find scanning negative materials a pain, and sympathize.
>
> www.scantips.com tends to be really basic, but might have some helpfull
> stuff on scanning negatives.

Thanks.

-=- Rick

--
Richard Karash <Richard(a)Karash.com>
Richard "at" Karash "dot" com
From: David J. Littleboy on

"Richard Karash" <Richard(a)Karash.com> wrote:
> David J. Littleboy <davidjl(a)gol.com> wrote:
>
>> ... but Camera Raw is definately the
>> wrong tool to use for film scans. Camera Raw is for converting digital
>> camera raw files, and only handles 3 colors per pixel RGB matrix images
>> (tiff/jpeg) as a convenience.
>
> I like that convenience... I like the sliders for Temp, Tint, Blacks,
> Recovery, Vibrance, Clarity, etc. I don't think these are available
> except in Camera Raw.

Some of these (e.g. Temp, Recovery) are not meaningful outide the context of
a raw file, others are just names for functions available elsewhere with
much more flexibility (blacks = Levels, Clarity = USM), others are available
as plug-ins (Vibrance is Fred Miranda's Velvia plug in and is something that
really shouldn't be done unless you already have a backup copy of your image
burned to CD-R).

Convenient, yes. But sometimes it's better to know what it is and why you
are doing it.

> I appreciate your comment David, but is there a reason not to want to
> use these in the workflow, taking the scanner output and getting it
> into Photoshop in good form?

As above.

>> Use Photoshop iteself for scanned files; it has the tools you need. (I
>> seem
>> to remember that Vuescan can store a "raw" file that includes the IR
>> information also. I'd think that only Vuescan would be able to deal with
>> such files.)
>
> This is interesting... What would you do with the IR channel within
> Photoshop? I found the automatic cleaning in the scanner software
> (Digital ICE) just fabulous.

Automatic cleaning is wonderful, but should be done in the scanner software
(Vuescan or Nikonscan). Getting the exposure (minimize any clipping) and
cleaning right in the scanner (and archive that) and then do everything else
in Photoshop is the basic idea for a scanning workflow.

--
David J. Littleboy
Tokyo, Japan