From: Bob Larter on
Bill Graham wrote:
>
> "wrbrown13" <wrbrown3(a)bellsouth.net> wrote in message
> news:xz99h2s243hc$.9skloajqavx8.dlg(a)40tude.net...
>> On Thu, 10 Sep 2009 15:36:20 -0700, Bill Graham wrote:
>>
>>> "Bob G" <mrbobjames(a)yahoo.com> wrote in message
>>> news:adbcdb79-6c7f-4021-8fc0-3adf608d7083(a)w10g2000yqf.googlegroups.com...
>>>
>>>> Republicans would rather get jerked around by the corporations than by
>>>> the government. Wait until you get a horrible diseaase and your health
>>>> insurance company drops you like a hot potato.
>>>>
>>>> The fact is that this nation is now an oligarchy (and has been for
>>>> some time) and not a democracy.
>>>>
>>>> How does that go, from the corporations, by the corporations, and for
>>>> the corporations?
>>>
>>> That is what litigation is supposed to correct.....You still have the
>>> right
>>> to sue. But I never said that government couldn't regulate. Your health
>>> insurance policy should list the stuff it doesn't cover, in large ten
>>> point
>>> type.......I would vote for a law like that.
>>
>>
>> Now there's a thought. Sue a large corporation who has any number of
>> lawyers on their staff and can drag litigation out intil you don't have a
>> penny to your name. Great in theory, but a joke in reality.
>
> They usually settle out of court. Why? Because juries are very
> sympathetic to the little guy, and have been known to award many
> millions of the big companies money to him.

After years of litigation, during which the plaintiff may have died of
their illness.

--
W
. | ,. w , "Some people are alive only because
\|/ \|/ it is illegal to kill them." Perna condita delenda est
---^----^---------------------------------------------------------------
From: Ray Fischer on
Bob Larter <bobbylarter(a)gmail.com> wrote:
>stephe_k(a)yahoo.com wrote:
>> Bill Graham wrote:
>>
>>> We have been over this ground too many times already. Let's just look
>>> at the present and near future.
>>
>> Well you might need to look at what Obama was handed by GWB before you
>> try to blame him for where we are.
>>
>>> How can any good come out of spending several trillion dollars right now?
>>
>> Have you looked around the world? We are NOT the only Gov pumping money
>> into their economy trying to avoid a Depression.
>
>Yep. In Australia, the government pumped a ton of cash into stimulus
>payments for just about everybody, & told us to go spend it. We did, &
>it kept us out of a recession by the skin of our teeth. In fact, we're
>the only G20 nation that has avoided recession. The only thing Obama has
>done wrong is not give /enough/ money to people who'd go straight out &
>spend it.

What the rightards and politicians don't seem to grasp is that giving
tons of money to rich people doesn't do squat for the economy, and
most likely makes things even worse because they often ship their
money out of the country. Give stimulus money to the poor and middle
classes and the money will get spent and will get spent in the
country.

--
Ray Fischer
rfischer(a)sonic.net

From: Chris Malcolm on
In rec.photo.digital D. Peter Maus <DPeterMaus(a)worldnet.att.net> wrote:
>> "D. Peter Maus" <DPeterMaus(a)worldnet.att.net> wrote in message
>> news:h8uea5$q21$1(a)news.eternal-september.org...
>>> On 9/17/09 17:33 , SMS wrote:
>>>> Bill Graham wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> It's amazing how few people here break into houses, when they know
>>>>> that the occupants probably have a gun.
>>>>
>>>> In fact, the opposite is true. Nearly all break-ins occur when the
>>>> occupants are not home. Guns are one of the items most likely to be
>>>> stolen in house break-ins.
>>>>
>>>>> If I were a professional house breaker, I would go to some country
>>>>> where no one is allowed to own a gun. That's just good common sense.
>>>>
>>>> A professional "house breaker" does not break into houses that are
>>>> occupied. They do break into houses where they think fence-able items
>>>> are available. An indication that the homeowner is a member of the NRA
>>>> would indicate the probability that handguns are stored in the house.
>>>>
>>>
>>> > If you want to prevent break-ins, install security cameras,
>>> alarms, and
>>>> get a dog that barks a lot when strangers approach. You'll be much more
>>>> likely to prevent a break-in than you would by owning a gun.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Um...when Morton Grove banned handguns, home invasions went up 128%.
>>>
>>>
>> Just look at the crime rate in New York City, where handguns have been
>> illegal all of my life.

> Or DC.

Or Tokyo, where people leave their suitases out on the street while
they have a cup of tea inside the house waiting for a taxi, leave
their bicycles in the street unlocked with shopping in the basket when
they're shopping, and where ex-pat American women say how amazing it
is to be able to walk the streets alone at night feeling quite safe.

There's more to the problem than guns -- the elephant in the room
nobody wants to talk about is why are US cities such savage places?

--
Chris Malcolm
From: SMS on
Bob Larter wrote:

> Given that my son was born at 26 weeks, & is now a perfectly healthy 8
> year old, abortions as late as that do bother me a lot. That said, I
> still believe that the woman's right to choose trumps the rights of the
> foetus.

My daughter was 27 weeks, son was 32 weeks, and both are fine. The
memory of the NICU ordeals will remain with me forever, as I'm sure it
does with everyone that goes through it.

>> While their opposition to RU486 is pretty ridiculous, at least you can
>> see where they are coming from in opposing abortion after the fetus is
>> more than a few weeks old.
>
> My personal dividing line is at the point where the foetus is viable
> outside the womb. Currently, I think that's around 24 weeks.

There are cases where there are extremely serious problems that are not
known until the third trimester, cases where there is no reason to
continue the pregnancy. This is where the right-wingers come up with
their "only god can decide" schtick. Of course they don't apply the same
criteria to other parts of others lives.
From: J. Clarke on
Chris Malcolm wrote:
> In rec.photo.digital D. Peter Maus <DPeterMaus(a)worldnet.att.net>
> wrote:
>>> "D. Peter Maus" <DPeterMaus(a)worldnet.att.net> wrote in message
>>> news:h8uea5$q21$1(a)news.eternal-september.org...
>>>> On 9/17/09 17:33 , SMS wrote:
>>>>> Bill Graham wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> It's amazing how few people here break into houses, when they
>>>>>> know that the occupants probably have a gun.
>>>>>
>>>>> In fact, the opposite is true. Nearly all break-ins occur when the
>>>>> occupants are not home. Guns are one of the items most likely to
>>>>> be stolen in house break-ins.
>>>>>
>>>>>> If I were a professional house breaker, I would go to some
>>>>>> country where no one is allowed to own a gun. That's just good
>>>>>> common sense.
>>>>>
>>>>> A professional "house breaker" does not break into houses that are
>>>>> occupied. They do break into houses where they think fence-able
>>>>> items are available. An indication that the homeowner is a member
>>>>> of the NRA would indicate the probability that handguns are
>>>>> stored in the house.
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>>> If you want to prevent break-ins, install security cameras,
>>>> alarms, and
>>>>> get a dog that barks a lot when strangers approach. You'll be
>>>>> much more likely to prevent a break-in than you would by owning a
>>>>> gun.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Um...when Morton Grove banned handguns, home invasions went up
>>>> 128%.
>>>>
>>>>
>>> Just look at the crime rate in New York City, where handguns have
>>> been illegal all of my life.
>
>> Or DC.
>
> Or Tokyo, where people leave their suitases out on the street while
> they have a cup of tea inside the house waiting for a taxi, leave
> their bicycles in the street unlocked with shopping in the basket when
> they're shopping, and where ex-pat American women say how amazing it
> is to be able to walk the streets alone at night feeling quite safe.
>
> There's more to the problem than guns -- the elephant in the room
> nobody wants to talk about is why are US cities such savage places?

Imagine there being an office with a sign on the door that says "Mafia
Headquarters", a Mafia-published newsletter reporting accurately their
activities, and community services openly provided by the Mafia, Mafiosi
running around in a corporate uniform, with any criminal not authorized by
the Mafia likely to have a very short life.

Well it's like that in Japan. Google "Yakuza". Nobody would accuse them of
being "nice guys" but they have rules, and anyone wanting to be a live
criminal in Japan follows them.