From: David J. Littleboy on

"C J Campbell" <christophercampbellremovethis(a)hotmail.com> wrote:
>>
>> Actually, juries have very good "bullshit detectors" by and large, and
>> it's very rare for a frivolous or fraudulent malpractice suit to
>> succeed. Any little guy vs big guy sympathies are balanced by the
>> pleasure to be had in sending a con packing. Seriously, the whole idea
>> that's been going around of capping awards in these cases serves no
>> one near as well as the *real* incompetent and/or reckless medical
>> professionals who will save money but who should be out of the
>> business entirely. Hey, if folks are hell-bent on capping rightfully
>> won awards, I guess they will, but let's have some professional
>> repercussions to weed out the real bad doctors, nurses, etc. and keep
>> them out.
>
> The trouble is that most cases never go to trial. The insurance companies
> nearly always settle for something, because the cost of defending is
> greater than the cost of paying something on even the most frivolous
> claim. That raises insurance rates for everyone, plus it encourages
> medical professionals to practice exceedingly defensive medicine.

Actually, people who have looked at medical malpractice cases find that
frivolous claims are few and far between and almost never get paid (and, as
above, the ones that make it to trial do badly).

Inversely, the number of cases where people are hurt by medical malpractice
and don't get compensated is large. Many don't even turn into claims, it
would have been difficult to sue), and many valid claims get discarded,
rejected, or lose in court. The bottom line is that the reason there is so
much paid out to patients from malpractice insurance is that there's so much
malpractice.

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/12/opinion/12baker.html?_r=1

http://www.insurance-reform.org/issues/MedMalMedmalErrorsFactSheet2009F.html

And the amount of money changing hands in malpractice cases is insignificant
and falling.

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/158494.php

Thus there are three problems in medical malpractice system: (1) (as above)
too few people are being compensated, (2) the malpractice insurance
companies aren't lowering their premiums even though the number of cases and
awards has been falling (and thus are ripping off the doctors*, but not by
an amount that has any significance at the policy level), and (3) the
doctors don't want there to be any malpractice system at all, i.e. don't
want to take responsibility for their mistakes.

*: http://www.insurance-reform.org/pr/070328.html

--
David J. Littleboy
Tokyo, Japan


From: D. Peter Maus on
On 9/13/09 16:34 , Bill Graham wrote:
>
> "D. Peter Maus" <DPeterMaus(a)worldnet.att.net> wrote in message
> news:h8eg31$9qs$1(a)news.eternal-september.org...
>> On 9/11/09 16:34 , Bill Graham wrote:
>>>
>>> Everyone (all 300 million of us citizens)
>>> should have a government ID card, and/or a chip implanted in us that
>>> identifies us as US citizens in good standing, and if we are sick, then
>>> the chip should get us the treatment we need. Today's technology is more
>>> than adequate to accomplish this.
>>
>> Be careful what you wish for.
>
> Well, we are fast approaching the alternative, which is to treat
> everyone as citizens whether they pay any taxes or are illegal aliens or
> not. If I am going to pay taxes, then I would like to be identified as
> a, "taxpayer" in good standing, and that means a valid ID that goes with
> me wherever I am. It will be my license to vote, and get medical care. I
> am very tired of paying for other peoples way.



My point was not that illegal aliens are to be separated from the
rights and privileges of citizens. In that we're in agreement. For
precisely the reasons you state.

My point was that 'chipping' brings with it the worst kind of
potential for abuse.
From: Bill Graham on

"tony cooper" <tony_cooper213(a)earthlink.net> wrote in message
news:cs2oa5dlcgtenv6so0j35bohoarl9jvaib(a)4ax.com...
> On Sat, 12 Sep 2009 15:44:12 -0400, Walter Banks
> <walter(a)bytecraft.com> wrote:
>
>>
>>
>>Bill Graham wrote:
>>
>>> In my world, yes, yes, yes. Everyone (all 300 million of us citizens)
>>> should
>>> have a government ID card, and/or a chip implanted in us that identifies
>>> us
>>> as US citizens in good standing, and if we are sick, then the chip
>>> should
>>> get us the treatment we need. Today's technology is more than adequate
>>> to
>>> accomplish this.
>>
>>Well put
>
> Yeah, right. With the chip acting as a homing device for the
> government to locate us at any time. Besides, all the chip would
> accomplish is to give birth to a new industry: manufacturing
> counterfeit chips and implanting them in illegals.
> --
> Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida

Ah.....You are such a pessimist, Tony.....

From: Bill Graham on

"David Ruether" <d_ruether(a)thotmail.com> wrote in message
news:h8h442$lf9$1(a)ruby.cit.cornell.edu...
>
> "Walter Banks" <walter(a)bytecraft.com> wrote in message
> news:4AABFA0C.7A417C71(a)bytecraft.com...
>> Bill Graham wrote:
>
>>> In my world, yes, yes, yes. Everyone (all 300 million of us citizens)
>>> should
>>> have a government ID card, and/or a chip implanted in us that identifies
>>> us
>>> as US citizens in good standing, and if we are sick, then the chip
>>> should
>>> get us the treatment we need. Today's technology is more than adequate
>>> to
>>> accomplish this.
>
>> Well put
>
> I trust you two are joking... Talk about ultimate "socialism", ultimate
> government control over its citizenry, and just plain obvious potential
> for the development of ultimate nightmare despotism... THINK!!!
> (Sheesh!)
> --DR
I think of it as the lesser of two evils. Right now, the government is
giving my money away to the illegal aliens in bushel baskets, and they can't
even stop the illegal immigration into this country by those anxious to get
it. As long as they cant secure our borders, they might as well be able to
identify us payers, and be able to separate us from the "payees".

From: Bill Graham on

"J. Clarke" <jclarke.usenet(a)cox.net> wrote in message
news:h8h5ls02q0p(a)news2.newsguy.com...
> Walter Banks wrote:
>> Bill Graham wrote:
>>
>>> In my world, yes, yes, yes. Everyone (all 300 million of us
>>> citizens) should have a government ID card, and/or a chip implanted
>>> in us that identifies us as US citizens in good standing, and if we
>>> are sick, then the chip should get us the treatment we need. Today's
>>> technology is more than adequate to accomplish this.
>>
>> Well put
>
> Carries "papieren bitte" to a whole new level.
>
> Why not just fingerprint everybody or pull a DNA sample?

Whatever works the cheapest and easiest. they can use the marks in your
eyes, too.