From: Nicholas O. Lindan on
David Nebenzahl Wrote:
> Well, the results of my first use of Tmax 100 are in here at Nebenzahl
> Laboratories, GmbH, and I can tell you that I'm very happy with them.
> I developed it in D-76, 1:1 dilution, using rather old (~5 years) stock,
> and the negatives came out looking gorgeous. The prints, too. (This was
> 35mm film.

Try 35mm TMax 100 in Microdol-X - the grain is as fine as the late lamented
TechPan though it does not have the same 'large-format look'.

--
Nicholas O. Lindan, Cleveland, Ohio
Darkroom Automation: F-Stop Timers, Enlarging Meters
http://www.darkroomautomation.com/da-main.htm
n o lindan at ix dot netcom dot com


From: Richard Knoppow on

"Keith Tapscott." <Keith.Tapscott..69b4748(a)photobanter.com>
wrote in message
news:Keith.Tapscott..69b4748(a)photobanter.com...
>
> Nicholas O. Lindan;885494 Wrote:
>>
>> Try 35mm TMax 100 in Microdol-X - the grain is as fine as
>> the late
>> lamented
>> TechPan though it does not have the same 'large-format
>> look'.
>>
>> --
>> Nicholas O. Lindan, Cleveland, Ohio
>> Darkroom Automation: F-Stop Timers, Enlarging Meters
>> http://www.darkroomautomation.com/da-main.htm
>> n o lindan at ix dot netcom dot comThe trouble with that
>> is, what to use when the Mic-X supply runs out?
>
> There's Ilford Perceptol which is a good substitute and
> also Rollei
> Low-Speed developer which is a similar type of developer
> to Mic-X and
> Perceptol, but sold as a liquid concentrate.
>
> http://www.imx.nl/photo/Film/page123/page123.html
>
>
>
>
> --
> Keith Tapscott.

As far as I can tell Perceptol and Microdol-X are
identical. The differences in developing times given for
them for some films is probably because of a difference in
the contrast index being used for the testing. In both
developers the fine grain agent is sodium chloride.
Both developers have an extra-fine-grain property when
used full strength but loose it when diluted. There is a
speed loss of about 3/4 stop when used full strength but
when diluted 1:3 the speed is about the same as in D-76,
however, the grain is also comparable then. Both are
acutance developers when diluted.
The line about T-Max being as fine grained in
Microdol-X as Technical Pan in Technidol is from me. I've
used T-Max 100 in Perceptol and Microdol-X full strength.
Speed about EI-50. The results were very fine grain and had
the smoothness I would normally associate with a larger
negative. The combination is much easier to handle than
Technical Pan was since the contrast does not become
excessive so easily. I found that Technical Pan in Technidol
had to be shot at about EI-12 to avoid excessive contrast
and difficult to print negatives.
A caution: the combination had virtually no acutance
effect so images may appear to be somewhat blurry unless
your lenses are outstanding. I am, of course, talking about
35mm. For 2-1/4 x 2-1/4 the difference is not so great
although it will help if you make very large prints.
As far as overall performance it depends on what you
want. For general use D-76 either full strength or 1:1 works
fine for T-Max films and is probably what was used during
the research period. Xtol is the optimum developer yielding
slightly higher speed and slightly finer grain than D-76 and
not producing a shoulder until very high densities are
reached. T-Max RS also yields somewhat higher speed but I've
found it to be slightly grainier than D-76. Both T-Max RS
and Xtol are excellent for pushing.
Tone rendition is similar for all although there are
some differences in the shape of the published curves. For
the most part the curve shape of a film is determined by the
emulsion and is varied only a little by development.
However, it may be enough to make a noticable difference and
after that its a matter of taste.


--
--
Richard Knoppow
Los Angeles, CA, USA
dickburk(a)ix.netcom.com



From: Peter Irwin on
Richard Knoppow <dickburk(a)ix.netcom.com> wrote:
....
> A caution: the combination had virtually no acutance
> effect so images may appear to be somewhat blurry unless
> your lenses are outstanding.

This matches my experience with TMX in Microdol-X. Grain
is amazingly fine, actual resolution is very good, but it just
didn't look /sharp/.

Xtol (1:1) gave me much sharper looking results than Microdol-X
at full strength. I somewhat puzzled at how obvious the effect
seemed; everything I think I know tells me to expect more subtle
differences. And yet "appear to be somewhat blurry" only seems
a slight exaggeration of my disappointment with TMX in Microdol-X.

Peter.
--
pirwin(a)ktb.net



From: Nicholas O. Lindan on
"Richard Knoppow" <dickburk(a)ix.netcom.com> wrote

> The line about T-Max being as fine grained in Microdol-X as Technical Pan
> in Technidol is from me.

HA! If I could get Google to search rec.photo.darkroom -
I am sure I was pointing this out as early as ...

* * * *

Perceptol - from the MSDS information - doesn't really
look a whole lot like Microdol-X

Part A:
Metol

Part B
S. Sulfite
S. Bromide
S. Tripolyphosphate (STPP)

The STPP is a water softening agent in this application
(among it's other uses it adds weight to seafood by making
it retain water). I don't know if there is a dichroic
fog inhibitor or if the bromide takes care of it.

I guess P. Bromide could be a fine-grain agent, but I would
wonder about its effect on shadow detail. The only film
developer w/ bromide TIKO (WTEO Perceptol) is D-96, used
by the motion picture industry.

One rather whacked-out developer in the Microdol-X vein
is Rollei RLS (LP Cube XS) that is made from

Metol
Ammonium Chloride

without the s. sulfite (if the MSDS can be believed).

--
Nicholas O. Lindan, Cleveland, Ohio
Darkroom Automation: F-Stop Timers, Enlarging Meters
http://www.darkroomautomation.com/da-main.htm
n o lindan at ix dot netcom dot com


From: Nicholas O. Lindan on
"Peter Irwin" <pirwin(a)ktb.net> wrote

> This matches my experience with TMX in Microdol-X. Grain
> is amazingly fine, actual resolution is very good, but it just
> didn't look /sharp/.

I used TMX/M-X for shooting resolution targets a few years ago
when I ran out of Tech Pan.

I found the combination has the same resolution with a high
contrast target as Tech Pan. Microdol-X does not reduce
resolution. That it is a 'solvent developer' is an urban
legend - it has no more S. Sulfite in it than D-76.

Often systems that have lower resolution look sharper.
I am not interested in the appearance of detail, but only in
real detail. 'Acutance' and touted 'edge effects' are,
in my book, vile concepts.

--
Nicholas O. Lindan, Cleveland, Ohio
Darkroom Automation: F-Stop Timers, Enlarging Meters
http://www.darkroomautomation.com/da-main.htm
n o lindan at ix dot netcom dot com


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