From: Bill Graham on

"tony cooper" <tony_cooper213(a)earthlink.net> wrote in message
news:edtrf5pdji5jfmac6eu9eudoojnq876qel(a)4ax.com...
> On Fri, 13 Nov 2009 18:25:21 +0000, Chris H <chris(a)phaedsys.org>
> wrote:
>
>>Only whilst the US stays within it's own boarders and does not trade
>>with anyone else.
>
> We repel boarders ever since those water-boarding incidents.
>
>
> --
> Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida

If we, "Stayed within our own borders and didn't trade with anyone else" ,
the rest of the world would go broke.....Who do they think uses half the
world's goods and services? It's all those English-system loving housewives,
baby!

From: Bill Graham on

"J�rgen Exner" <jurgenex(a)hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:5d7sf551q57pt73fl4mf1c4ibiclc45l18(a)4ax.com...
> "Bill Graham" <weg9(a)comcast.net> wrote:
>>No. The world should standardize on JUST ONE SYSTEM. It doesn't really
>>matter which one, although anyone with half a brain would realize that the
>>metric system is the best one. It would be as easy as teaching your
>>grammar
>>school students some other system for the first 4 or 5 years of their
>>education.....How hard is that?
>
> In that country: impossible. People are so afraid, that on sightseeing
> signs they would even scratch off the metric value whenever it is
> mentioned in addition to miles or feet.
>
> jue

It wouldn't be so bad if the sign makers used the words, "Km, Mls, or Ft"
But unfortunately, the whole world seems to have a disease called,
"Units-a-phobia" Nobody uses units on anything....When I drove my motorcycle
into Canada for the first time, many years ago, I saw a sine that said,
"Speed limit 100" I drove through the pouring rain about fifty miles as fast
as I could before I came to a town and saw a sign in a school zone that
said, "Speed limit 40" and suddenly realized that they were talking about Km
per hour, and not Miles per hour.

From: J�rgen Exner on
"Neil Harrington" <secret(a)illumnati.net> wrote:
>As a unit of liquid measure, the cup is what it is and does not have any
>particular relationship to the amount of coffee you're served in a cup.

Then if the unit "cup" doesn't have a relationship to a cup of beverage
then what is the specific benefit of having that unit "cup" instead of
using e.g 1/4 liter?

jue
From: Bill Graham on

"J�rgen Exner" <jurgenex(a)hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:r48sf5hvnn2lu320s5prvsp7agi8aar9ff(a)4ax.com...
> "Neil Harrington" <secret(a)illumnati.net> wrote:
>>As a unit of liquid measure, the cup is what it is and does not have any
>>particular relationship to the amount of coffee you're served in a cup.
>
> Then if the unit "cup" doesn't have a relationship to a cup of beverage
> then what is the specific benefit of having that unit "cup" instead of
> using e.g 1/4 liter?
>
> jue

None. It's just a slang term. Actually, when it comes to a cup of coffee,
it's usually closer to 1/4 liter than a cup, which is 1/4 of a quart. You
have to remember that the world is 99% housewives, and only 1% engineers.

From: Savageduck on
On 2009-11-13 19:28:38 -0800, "Bill Graham" <weg9(a)comcast.net> said:

>
> "J�rgen Exner" <jurgenex(a)hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:r48sf5hvnn2lu320s5prvsp7agi8aar9ff(a)4ax.com...
>> "Neil Harrington" <secret(a)illumnati.net> wrote:
>>> As a unit of liquid measure, the cup is what it is and does not have any
>>> particular relationship to the amount of coffee you're served in a cup.
>>
>> Then if the unit "cup" doesn't have a relationship to a cup of beverage
>> then what is the specific benefit of having that unit "cup" instead of
>> using e.g 1/4 liter?
>>
>> jue
>
> None. It's just a slang term. Actually, when it comes to a cup of
> coffee, it's usually closer to 1/4 liter than a cup, which is 1/4 of a
> quart. You have to remember that the world is 99% housewives, and only
> 1% engineers.

That would explain a pinch of salt.


--
Regards,

Savageduck