From: tony cooper on
On Sat, 14 Nov 2009 21:03:59 -0000, "R. Mark Clayton"
<nospamclayton(a)btinternet.com> wrote:

>US units are a shambolic mess, inconsistent with each other and almost
>completely irrational for dealing with the real world.
>
And yet we manage.

The world that each of us lives in is the "real world". We, who live
in the US, have no problem dealing with our system.


--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
From: Bill Graham on

"Neil Harrington" <secret(a)illumnati.net> wrote in message
news:m-mdnaJ57uJl1GPXnZ2dnUVZ_r6dnZ2d(a)giganews.com...
>
> "Bill Graham" <weg9(a)comcast.net> wrote in message
> news:4fydnTAOxeEYhGPXnZ2dnUVZ_qmdnZ2d(a)giganews.com...
>>
>> "Neil Harrington" <secret(a)illumnati.net> wrote in message
>> news:0aWdndpkrMXpBGDXnZ2dnUVZ_rGdnZ2d(a)giganews.com...
>>>
>>> "Bill Graham" <weg9(a)comcast.net> wrote in message
>>> news:Y-qdnVjXHOA4V2HXnZ2dnUVZ_hadnZ2d(a)giganews.com...
>>>>
>>>
>>>>>
>>>> What makes me wonder is why we don't have 13 months of exactly 4 weeks
>>>> each?
>>>
>>> Actually, the twelve-month calendar Julius Caesar gave us was a huge
>>> improvement on the ten-month Roman calendar on which it was based, and
>>> served pretty well for many centuries. I think it was Pope Gregory who
>>> made the last adjustments including the leap year arrangement.
>>>
>>>> Any bridge player can tell you that 13 times 4 is 52. This would be a
>>>> much better system than the stupid 12 months in a year system we have
>>>> now. We would still need a leap year day once every 4 years, but
>>>> otherwise, all months would be the same.
>>>
>>> A leap year every 4 years wouldn't quite do it, though. Thirteen
>>> four-week months only gives you 364 days, which is about 1.24 days short
>>> of an actual year.
>>>
>> Well, there are 4 X 13 weeks (52) in a year right now, so there wouldn't
>> be any difference between the correction we have right now and the one we
>> would have with a 13 month year. We would still need a leap year day
>> (February 29th) once every four years just as we have now.
>
> No, the leap year day only makes up for the extra 0.24 day that the Julian
> calendar was short. Not counting leap year, a year is 52 weeks + 1 day
> (365 days in all).
>
>> The only difference is the number of days per month wouldn't jump up and
>> down from month to month as it does now......We wouldn't have to memorize
>> the, "30 days hath September, April, June, and November....." poem that
>> every schoolchild does now. All months would have exactly 28 days 3 years
>> out of every 4. So, if the first of the month is on a Saturday this
>> month, then you would know that the first of every month will also be on
>> a Saturday for the rest of the year, and this would go on until the next
>> leap year's February......This would be very convenient when trying to
>> plan your future appointments.
>
> You'd still have to get that extra day in somewhere.
>
Yes. I would give February a normal 29 days, and 30 on leap year. But this
would still be pretty easy to schedule around. Or, it would be good to just
add the extra day to new years day. Make New years a two day holiday.....Few
people have appointments on New Years.....(They are usually recovering from
hangovers, and could appreciate an extra day....:^)

From: Bill Graham on

"ColinD" <nospam(a)nospam.invalid> wrote in message
news:hdljde$hvh$1(a)news.eternal-september.org...
> Bill Graham wrote:
>>
>> "Neil Harrington" <secret(a)illumnati.net> wrote in message
>> news:Ba-dnXxPaOA3AmDXnZ2dnUVZ_gmdnZ2d(a)giganews.com...
>>>
>>> "Chris H" <chris(a)phaedsys.org> wrote in message
>>> news:Y$7wpfVEOY$KFAb8(a)phaedsys.demon.co.uk...
>>>> In message <W8-dnQ16jqYTl2fXnZ2dnUVZ_vSdnZ2d(a)giganews.com>, Neil
>>>> Harrington <secret(a)illumnati.net> writes
>>>>>> Even though the Yanks left the Empire they still won't join the rest
>>>>>> of
>>>>>> the world.
>>>>>
>>>>> And go metric, you mean? There'd be no point to it.
>>>>
>>>> You may have no choice... In many places I see Global standards that
>>>> are
>>>> used the whole world over except in the USA. Eventually the US is
>>>> going
>>>> to have to fit in with the rest of the world.
>>>
>>> The two systems co-exist perfectly well in virtually all everyday
>>> applications. If you're expecting to see American mileage signs on the
>>> highways change to kilometers, neither you nor your great-grandchildren
>>> will see that happen in your entire lifetimes. And we'll still be buying
>>> our milk in quarts and our meat by the pound. There is simply no reason
>>> to change.
>>>
>>> The metric system seems to have started because Europeans squabbled over
>>> measurements, as Europeans always do over one thing or another. The
>>> English mile was different from the Italian mile, and neither would
>>> accept the standard of the other. English barrels came in different
>>> sizes for different liquids, confusing units of measure based on the
>>> barrel. And so on. Such problems neither had then nor have now nothing
>>> to do with us here.
>>>
>> It's just like the drive on the left/right side of the road
>> controversy.....What could be more stupid than that? All the auto
>> manufacturers in the world have to make their cars mirror-imaged for
>> export to England and Australia, and they even have to change lanes in
>> the middle of the tunnel under the English channel......Ridiculous!
>> Especially when it takes anyone with half a brain about 10 minutes to
>> learn to drive on the other side of the road! And these are countries who
>> aren't even at war with one another.....Go figure.....
>
> Also South Africa and half the rest of African countries, also Japan, Hong
> Kong, Taiwan, and the biggie, Indonesia - more population than the USA -
> all drive on the left, and Tonga has just changed to driving on the left
> because cars sourced from drive-left countries are cheaper and better
> suited to the island.
>
> As for adapting to the other side of the road in about 10 minutes, there
> are real problems with that. In this country - New Zealand - we have many
> road accidents caused by American and European drivers. They can drive on
> the 'wrong' side while they think about it, but when it comes to
> roundabouts they get confused and end up on the wrong side of the road.
> And in an emergency situation, instinct kicks in and they automatically
> steer right - right into oncoming traffic. There was an American on a
> motor bike not long ago who did that, and went head-on into a truck, lost
> a leg among other serious injuries. An Austrian woman in a rental RV did
> the same, and collected about 8 or 9 motorbikes out on a charity run,
> killed about five of them including a father and daughter. 10 minutes is
> a joke. Six months is more like it, to retrain your automatic reactions.
>
> Colin D.

Yes, but you already have these problems now. (You have just listed a
couple ) So, the sooner we all get together and change, the better.....We
should poll the driving world, and change to the system that is presently
used by the majority of drivers right now. Sure, there would be an initial
increase in accidents and deaths, but as time went on, this would be made up
for by the long term decrease due to people not having to relearn how to
drive on the other side when they move to different countries. And, the auto
manufacturers could settle on building their vehicles just one way for
everybody.

From: Bill Graham on

"Savageduck" <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote in message
news:2009111323062022503-savageduck1(a)REMOVESPAMmecom...
> On 2009-11-13 22:40:42 -0800, ColinD <nospam(a)nospam.invalid> said:
>
>> Bill Graham wrote:
>>>
>>> "Neil Harrington" <secret(a)illumnati.net> wrote in message
>>> news:Ba-dnXxPaOA3AmDXnZ2dnUVZ_gmdnZ2d(a)giganews.com...
>>>>
>>>> "Chris H" <chris(a)phaedsys.org> wrote in message
>>>> news:Y$7wpfVEOY$KFAb8(a)phaedsys.demon.co.uk...
>>>>> In message <W8-dnQ16jqYTl2fXnZ2dnUVZ_vSdnZ2d(a)giganews.com>, Neil
>>>>> Harrington <secret(a)illumnati.net> writes
>>>>>>> Even though the Yanks left the Empire they still won't join the rest
>>>>>>> of
>>>>>>> the world.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> And go metric, you mean? There'd be no point to it.
>>>>>
>>>>> You may have no choice... In many places I see Global standards that
>>>>> are
>>>>> used the whole world over except in the USA. Eventually the US is
>>>>> going
>>>>> to have to fit in with the rest of the world.
>>>>
>>>> The two systems co-exist perfectly well in virtually all everyday
>>>> applications. If you're expecting to see American mileage signs on the
>>>> highways change to kilometers, neither you nor your great-grandchildren
>>>> will see that happen in your entire lifetimes. And we'll still be
>>>> buying our milk in quarts and our meat by the pound. There is simply no
>>>> reason to change.
>>>>
>>>> The metric system seems to have started because Europeans squabbled
>>>> over measurements, as Europeans always do over one thing or another.
>>>> The English mile was different from the Italian mile, and neither would
>>>> accept the standard of the other. English barrels came in different
>>>> sizes for different liquids, confusing units of measure based on the
>>>> barrel. And so on. Such problems neither had then nor have now nothing
>>>> to do with us here.
>>>>
>>> It's just like the drive on the left/right side of the road
>>> controversy.....What could be more stupid than that? All the auto
>>> manufacturers in the world have to make their cars mirror-imaged for
>>> export to England and Australia, and they even have to change lanes in
>>> the middle of the tunnel under the English channel......Ridiculous!
>>> Especially when it takes anyone with half a brain about 10 minutes to
>>> learn to drive on the other side of the road! And these are countries
>>> who aren't even at war with one another.....Go figure.....
>>
>> Also South Africa and half the rest of African countries, also Japan,
>> Hong Kong, Taiwan, and the biggie, Indonesia - more population than the
>> USA - all drive on the left, and Tonga has just changed to driving on the
>> left because cars sourced from drive-left countries are cheaper and
>> better suited to the island.
>>
>> As for adapting to the other side of the road in about 10 minutes, there
>> are real problems with that. In this country - New Zealand - we have
>> many road accidents caused by American and European drivers. They can
>> drive on the 'wrong' side while they think about it, but when it comes
>> to roundabouts they get confused and end up on the wrong side of the
>> road. And in an emergency situation, instinct kicks in and they
>> automatically steer right - right into oncoming traffic. There was an
>> American on a motor bike not long ago who did that, and went head-on into
>> a truck, lost a leg among other serious injuries. An Austrian woman in a
>> rental RV did the same, and collected about 8 or 9 motorbikes out on a
>> charity run, killed about five of them including a father and daughter.
>> 10 minutes is a joke. Six months is more like it, to retrain your
>> automatic reactions.
>>
>> Colin D.
>
> The critical factor in maintaining safety in the left/right hand drive
> issue, is to be consistent with having a left hand drive when driving on
> the right, and right hand drive when driving on the left side of the road.
> This positions the driver along the center line on the road and away from
> the edge of the road in the direction of travel. I believe this was one of
> the major factors in banning left hand drive vehicles in many countries
> with driving on the left rules of the road.
>
> Those unfamiliar with local conditions have reflexive behavior which is
> difficult to over come. I have investigated accidents where a driver from
> a "left hand side of the road" country driving on the right in the US, has
> made a left turn at an intersection, the tendency is to turn sharp left,
> turning directly into oncoming traffic on the right. The same would be
> true when driving on the left and making a right turn, ending up in the
> left lane facing oncoming traffic.
>
> Still there are many right hand drive vehicles used for rural mail
> delivery in the US, and those drivers seem to do fine hugging the right
> edge of the road without turning into oncoming traffic.
>
Yes. As a long term motorcyclist, I would still have to learn to make wide
right turns, instead of tight ones as I do now.....The vehicle design would
not really make much difference. To me, the main difference would be the way
I approach my destinations. As an American driver, I have learned to avoid
left hand turns, so I approach places from the left, so I can spiral in on
them with right turns.....I would have to redesign all my normal routes to
spiral in on places with left hand turns, should right turns be worth
avoiding.....

From: Bill Graham on

"Bob Larter" <bobbylarter(a)gmail.com> wrote in message
news:4afe7080$1(a)dnews.tpgi.com.au...
> Bill Graham wrote:
>>
>> "J�rgen Exner" <jurgenex(a)hotmail.com> wrote in message
>> news:r48sf5hvnn2lu320s5prvsp7agi8aar9ff(a)4ax.com...
>>> "Neil Harrington" <secret(a)illumnati.net> wrote:
>>>> As a unit of liquid measure, the cup is what it is and does not have
>>>> any
>>>> particular relationship to the amount of coffee you're served in a cup.
>>>
>>> Then if the unit "cup" doesn't have a relationship to a cup of beverage
>>> then what is the specific benefit of having that unit "cup" instead of
>>> using e.g 1/4 liter?
>>>
>>> jue
>>
>> None. It's just a slang term. Actually, when it comes to a cup of coffee,
>> it's usually closer to 1/4 liter than a cup, which is 1/4 of a quart. You
>> have to remember that the world is 99% housewives, and only 1% engineers.
>
> A metric cup *is* 1/4 of a liter.
>
The most common coffee cup used here in the US is the Corning, "Correll
Ware" cup, and it is almost exactly 250 cc's.