From: Bill Graham on

"(PeteCresswell)" <x(a)y.Invalid> wrote in message
news:oe1kf596b0n1h84vi0dhj9j7m2541njgeq(a)4ax.com...
> Per Bill Graham:
>>
>>My daughter used to use a Suburban with 4 wheel drive to carry oxygen
>>bottles and wheelchairs to her patients in the winter snow, but she
>>stopped
>>buying them a few years ago because of poor reliability.
>
> This one, the first new car I've ever owned, has stranded me a
> total of six times so far. That's more times than I've been
> stranded (once) by 30+ years of driving beaters.
>
> But go in the snow, it does. In a nice heavy snowfall, I make a
> game out of seeing how long I can go with using 4wd. Usually
> it's until I do something stupid like stopping at the bottom of a
> hill or going into a rutted area without enough momentum.
> --
> PeteCresswell

Yes. My daughter owns a home health care business in Wyoming, and she needed
a big warm truck (like the suburban) but now she uses something else.....( I
forget exactly what it is) She has to carry heavy equipment, and sometimes
the patients themselves around in the snow.....

From: Bill Graham on

"J�rgen Exner" <jurgenex(a)hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:2tlkf5dv03jmudhdl6jij705tkfoom6hj2(a)4ax.com...
> "Neil Harrington" <secret(a)illumnati.net> wrote:
>>And go metric, you mean? There'd be no point to it. Metric is silly for
>>most
>>ordinary purposes,
>
> Yeah, right. That's probably the reason why 200+ countries are using it
> where there are only 3 that don't.
>
>>and it would cost billions to change everything.
>
> "Those who are late will be punished by life itself."
>
>>Hexadecimal really makes far more sense than metric,
>
> You got 16 fingers? Amazing!
> And you are fluent in adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing
> them, too? Like 3A4F + BE3 * 2D5? Even more amazing!
>
> Besides, what does the radix of a numeral system have to do with metric
> or not?
>
>>and that is closer to
>>the old familiar English systems of measure.
>
> ???
> What? Where except for small liquid quantities?
>
>>You blokes should have stayed
>>with what you had. (Well, except for currency I suppose. But even that had
>>the advantage of being charmingly quaint.)
>
> How many cubic inches are in a gallon, again? How many tea spoon are in
> one cubic foot of water? And how many inches are there to a mile? And
> how high can I lift 1 pound with the energy provided by 1 BTU in 1 hour?
> And do you even know how a furlong by a chain is commonly called today?
> Now tell me again, that that nonsense makes any logical sense.
>
> jue

Do people still add and subtract? - I thought everyone used a pocket
calculator for things like that.

From: J�rgen Exner on
"Bill Graham" <weg9(a)comcast.net> wrote:
>"J�rgen Exner" <jurgenex(a)hotmail.com> wrote in message
>> "Neil Harrington" <secret(a)illumnati.net> wrote:
>>>Hexadecimal really makes far more sense than metric,
>>
>> You got 16 fingers? Amazing!
>> And you are fluent in adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing
>> them, too? Like 3A4F + BE3 * 2D5? Even more amazing!
>>
[...]
>Do people still add and subtract? - I thought everyone used a pocket
>calculator for things like that.

Your pocket calculator must be pretty advanced to support hexadezimal
arithmetic. Of course those things do exist, but they are definitely
*NOT* commonplace. At least I've never seen keys 'A' to 'F' on e.g. the
typical TI-30.

jue
From: R. Mark Clayton on

"J�rgen Exner" <jurgenex(a)hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:gj6lf5dhnj8cl3cqsojdgf3mv30rn31osr(a)4ax.com...
> "Bill Graham" <weg9(a)comcast.net> wrote:
>>"J�rgen Exner" <jurgenex(a)hotmail.com> wrote in message
>>> "Neil Harrington" <secret(a)illumnati.net> wrote:
>>>>Hexadecimal really makes far more sense than metric,
>>>
>>> You got 16 fingers? Amazing!
>>> And you are fluent in adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing
>>> them, too? Like 3A4F + BE3 * 2D5? Even more amazing!
>>>
> [...]
>>Do people still add and subtract? - I thought everyone used a pocket
>>calculator for things like that.
>
> Your pocket calculator must be pretty advanced to support hexadezimal
> arithmetic. Of course those things do exist, but they are definitely
> *NOT* commonplace. At least I've never seen keys 'A' to 'F' on e.g. the
> typical TI-30.

Back in the early 80's IIRC Texas brought out the first hexadecimal
calculator (also did decimal, octal and binary). Common in programming
dept's.

Casio started producing multiple base calculators in the late 80's and most
of their scientific ones support it.

These days even my calculator from the pound shop has it and the answer to
the above is 21E42E = 2221102

>
> jue


From: nospam on
In article <h6adnWjrlq08m2bXnZ2dnUVZ8hWdnZ2d(a)bt.com>, R. Mark Clayton
<nospamclayton(a)btinternet.com> wrote:

> Back in the early 80's IIRC Texas brought out the first hexadecimal
> calculator (also did decimal, octal and binary). Common in programming
> dept's.

nope, the hp-16c was the first in 1982. hp also had the 15c which did
complex arithmetic and the hp-41c which could do pretty much anything.