From: Twibil on
On Nov 16, 9:14 pm, Jürgen Exner <jurge...(a)hotmail.com> wrote:
>
>
> I don't even know why I bother. Celsius replaced centigrade in 1948,
> because there were too many terminology conficts even at that time. That
> was over 70 years(!!!) ago.

Er, 1948 was *61* years ago the way the rest of us count things.

Perhaps this explains why your numerical arguments are gaining so
little traction.
From: Neil Harrington on

"Bill Graham" <weg9(a)comcast.net> wrote in message
news:TLSdnSSh4oDtqp_WnZ2dnUVZ_jadnZ2d(a)giganews.com...
>


>>
> I had a S & W 22 caliber revolver that would jam after firing about a
> dozen rounds through it. The clearance between the rear of the cylinder
> and the frame was too small, and I was never able to get it fixed......If
> I cleaned it after a couple of cylinder full's, then it would work for
> another two, but cleaning it that often was a PITA, so I never used it.

That's interesting, but between the *rear* of the cylinder and the frame?
Are you sure?

I've seen revolvers that would develop that problem at the *front* of the
cylinder, as leading built up between that part and the rear of the barrel.
But I can't see what could cause interference at the rear of the cylinder,
unless leading at the front of the chambers prevented new cartridges from
being inserted fully.


From: Bill Graham on

"Neil Harrington" <not(a)home.today> wrote in message
news:BIydndIRzdLn2p_WnZ2dnUVZ_u-dnZ2d(a)giganews.com...
>
> "Bill Graham" <weg9(a)comcast.net> wrote in message
> news:TLSdnSSh4oDtqp_WnZ2dnUVZ_jadnZ2d(a)giganews.com...
>>
>
>
>>>
>> I had a S & W 22 caliber revolver that would jam after firing about a
>> dozen rounds through it. The clearance between the rear of the cylinder
>> and the frame was too small, and I was never able to get it fixed......If
>> I cleaned it after a couple of cylinder full's, then it would work for
>> another two, but cleaning it that often was a PITA, so I never used it.
>
> That's interesting, but between the *rear* of the cylinder and the frame?
> Are you sure?
>
> I've seen revolvers that would develop that problem at the *front* of the
> cylinder, as leading built up between that part and the rear of the
> barrel. But I can't see what could cause interference at the rear of the
> cylinder, unless leading at the front of the chambers prevented new
> cartridges from being inserted fully.
>
Yes. this was a stainless steel 22 caliber 6 shot revolver with a 4 or 5
inch barrel. (I forget) Powder would get in between the ridge on the cases
and the cylinder, which would make the cases extend slightly too far to the
rear, and the cylinder would refuse to turn, causing the gun to jam......I
was unable to get anyone to fix it, although I didn't really try too hard.
(I had too many other guns to worry about it)

From: Savageduck on
On 2009-11-16 22:28:55 -0800, "Bill Graham" <weg9(a)comcast.net> said:

>
> "Neil Harrington" <secret(a)illumnati.net> wrote in message
> news:V6adnUsegoEAQpzWnZ2dnUVZ_o2dnZ2d(a)giganews.com...

<---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------->

I'm

>> sorry I sold that Mle. 1892. Perfectly useless of course, but an
>> interesting piece. Cylinder swung out to the right. Odd people, the
>> French.
>>
> Yes.....They like gadgets, which is exactly the wrong thing you would
> want in a reliable firearm......Auto loading pistols are lots of fun to
> play with, and sometimes very well made, like the German Lugar, but
> they aren't anything you would want to bet your life on.


The interesting thing is the '08 Luger had it's foundation in basic
toggle action design with a German-American Hugo Borchard.
Borchard had immigrated to the US and originally worked for Singer
Sewing Machine Company, before working for Winchester and Sharps. He
then returned to Europe and produced his C-93 which pioneered the
toggle action. He was also a consultant for Remington in the
development of the Lee rifle.

The '08 Luger was a refined and simplified redesign of the Borchard C-93.
http://www.gunsworld.com/gun_pistols/borchart_us.html

--
Regards,

Savageduck

From: Savageduck on
On 2009-11-16 23:00:07 -0800, "Bill Graham" <weg9(a)comcast.net> said:

>
> "Neil Harrington" <not(a)home.today> wrote in message
> news:BIydndIRzdLn2p_WnZ2dnUVZ_u-dnZ2d(a)giganews.com...
>>
>> "Bill Graham" <weg9(a)comcast.net> wrote in message
>> news:TLSdnSSh4oDtqp_WnZ2dnUVZ_jadnZ2d(a)giganews.com...
>>>
>>
>>
>>>>
>>> I had a S & W 22 caliber revolver that would jam after firing about a
>>> dozen rounds through it. The clearance between the rear of the cylinder
>>> and the frame was too small, and I was never able to get it
>>> fixed......If I cleaned it after a couple of cylinder full's, then it
>>> would work for another two, but cleaning it that often was a PITA, so I
>>> never used it.
>>
>> That's interesting, but between the *rear* of the cylinder and the
>> frame? Are you sure?
>>
>> I've seen revolvers that would develop that problem at the *front* of
>> the cylinder, as leading built up between that part and the rear of the
>> barrel. But I can't see what could cause interference at the rear of
>> the cylinder, unless leading at the front of the chambers prevented new
>> cartridges from being inserted fully.
>>
> Yes. this was a stainless steel 22 caliber 6 shot revolver with a 4 or
> 5 inch barrel. (I forget) Powder would get in between the ridge on the
> cases and the cylinder, which would make the cases extend slightly too
> far to the rear, and the cylinder would refuse to turn, causing the gun
> to jam......I was unable to get anyone to fix it, although I didn't
> really try too hard. (I had too many other guns to worry about it)

I find that difficult to believe of a S&W 22. The K-22 was a great
revolver and you could fire hundreds of accurate rounds out of it at
the range. The Model 17 chambered for 22 LR is very reliable and
accurate.

--
Regards,

Savageduck